Could this mean I'm getting somewhere?!

I saw my first endo (Dr L) 4 weeks ago and he was worse than useless - didn't really listen to my symptoms or concerns, became convinced that it's the sleep aponea that is causing everything and the pill that I'm on to control endometriosis is causing the weight gain (even though I've been on it for years with no issues). He referred me to a sleep clinic and did 4 blood tests just to shut me up! I decided I didn't want to see him again.

Last Saturday, slightly disheartened, I saw Dr E and what a difference! I came out feeling like I was walking on air! He listened, took me seriously and said "the way I work is I test for everything and take it from there, we work together to sort this out"....I could have lept over the desk and kissed him! He is also taking an interest in my PCOS. I now have to wait three weeks for my pill to be out of my system before having 21(!) blood tests, I'm scheduled for a scan of my thyroid and kidneys and having a 24hr blood pressure monitor.

He was really angry that no-one had thought to test Vit D or B12 in the 18 months I've been seeing the GP!

Back to see him on 1 June so fingers crossed!

Names edited out by Admin to protect the 'good' ones and we can't be seen to be naming and shaming the rest!

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  • Good luck,

    Hope he is your fairy godfather. We need more like him. Hope he is true to his word. I have seen 3 endo's I am sure there is a NHS factory turning out cloned robot endo's with the same mantra.

  • I'm very lucky in that I have private health cover through work, but I still ended up with a bad one first time round. Hopefully I'll finally get somewhere. Hope you do too Wightmouse - I know how it can affect every part of your life x

  • I haven't got a link but thought it may be of interest re PCOS. It is from Dr Lowe.

    The case I describe below is of importance to women with polycystic ovaries. If

    they have evidence, such as a high TSH, that conventional clinicians accept as evidence

    of hypothyroidism, they may fair well. But the TSH is not a valid gauge of a woman's

    tissue thyroid status. Because of this, she may fair best by adopting self-directed

    care. At any rate, for women with ovarian cysts, this case is one of extreme importance.

    In 2008, doctors at the gynecology department in Gunma, Japan reported the case

    of a 21-year-old women with primary hypothyroidism. Her doctor referred her to the

    gynecology department because she had abdominal pain and her abdomen was distended

    up to the level of her navel.

    At the gynecology clinic she underwent an abdominal ultrasound and CT scan. These

    imaging procedures showed multiple cysts on both her right and her left ovary.

    The woman's cholesterol level and liver function were increased. She also had a

    high level of the muscle enzyme (creatine phosphokinase) that's often high in hypothyroidism.

    Blood testing also showed that the woman had primary hypothyroidism from autoimmune

    thyroiditis.

    It is noteworthy that the young woman's ovarian cysts completely disappeared soon

    after she began thyroid hormone therapy. Other researchers have reported girls with

    primary hypothyroidism whose main health problems were ovarian cysts or precocious

    puberty. But this appears to be the first case in which a young adult female had

    ovarian cysts that resulted from autoimmune-induced hypothyroidism.

    The researchers cautioned clinicians: "To avoid inadvertent surgery to remove an

    ovarian tumor, it is essential that a patient with multiple ovarian cysts and hypothyroidism

    be properly managed, as the simple replacement of a thyroid hormone could resolve

    the ovarian cysts."[1]

    Reference:

    1. Kubota, K., Itho, M., Kishi, H., et al.: Primary hypothyroidism presenting as

    multiple ovarian cysts in an adult woman: a case report. Gynecol. Endocrinol.,

    24(10):586-589, 2008.

    ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

  • Thanks for this Shaws - I am beginning to believe that all is linked hormonally....just wish that GPs took symptoms etc more seriously instead of relying solely on blood tests and not what their patients were telling them. My PCOS hasn't been looked at in years, neither has the endometriosis or fibroids (got the whole set, lucky me!) but this chap seemed interested in it all. Fingers crossed x

  • Fairy, I'm also concerned you have to wait until this summer. At any rate, I've been posting these 5 min videos addressing all sorts of reasons for low thyroid. One of these touches on PCOS and again hormones are ALL interrelated so if one suffers they all suffer.

  • I totally agree with shaws comments. ALL your symptoms are related to your thyroid condition. These gps make me insane. If you went to the doctor with a broken leg and said "let us rule out measles, mumps or chicken pox" would that make any sense to leave with a broken bone!?! Let them fix what they can see and feel the shock that everything else goes to normal. Even your pcos is related. I'll post some links later. You poor thing.

  • Fairy's post is 2 years old?

  • LOL, Is this why I hate my ipad anymore? I had to log in and assumed these were new posts. OMG Why on earth would a post that old come up? Oooh, I'm not even going to try to figure that out. What a joke on me. But I wonder how she's doing?????? Thank you for letting me know and a good laugh.

  • I have to highlight over the date to see it sometimes - hope Fairy is OK too.

    How 'the powers that be' connect stuff is beyond me.

    Still, 2 years on & more knowledge! J :D

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