Dreading the Falsadex injection - SHARE Metastatic ...

SHARE Metastatic Breast Cancer
2,842 members2,651 posts

Dreading the Falsadex injection

lynzer
lynzer
40 Replies

Up and restless...can’t sleep because I’m due for my monthly Falsadex shot. I just don’t want it!! The nurses don’t do it right, so painful most of the time. There’s only one nurse who does them correctly. I also feel like such crap for weeks after. Feeling anxious 😟

40 Replies
oldestnewest
nstonerocks

While everyone is different, I posted here about getting my first shots and got great advice. I too was dreading it after reading that it was thick, the shots hurt, etc. Had 2 shots Saturday and I can say except for a slight stinging sensation, very mild, it wasn’t bad. I can sort of feel where it went in but nothing that ruins my day or stops me from moving freely. Having said all that, can you request the nurse you like? Have you spoken to the nurses about your discomfort? This is what my nurse did: brought it to room temperature,located the spot in the gluteus where she was going to inject, I stood, holding onto the arms of a chair. I bent the knee on the side of the shot, relaxing the gluteal muscle. She pinched up a little of the soft tissue and put the needle in and injected slower than you would for most shots but not very slowly. When you say you feel like crap for weeks afterward, what is it you feel? Did you tell your doctor? I sympathize with dreading this shot. Try diplomatically asking the nurse to go thru the above steps. I would even ask to speak to the head nurse if she is available and in private share your experience. Maybe the nurses need to be reminded and need an inservice about faslodex shots. If you don’t feel comfortable doing this, I’d bring it up with your doctor and they can speak to the head nurse. A lot of women apply warm packs after the shot. Helps med diffuse into muscle and feels good. Some recommend moving around after. I massaged the areas lightly and had no trouble walking around. It’s awful to spend weeks dreading the shot 😟

6 likes
Reply
lynzer
lynzer
in reply to nstonerocks

Thanks, I’ll try that. I’ve spoken to the supervisor last time and she gave me a different nurse. It wasn’t half as bad. I requested her but they said she’s per diem and they will try.

On my way this morning, I’ll try to discuss the other issues on giving it as well.

Thank you so much. I dread it coming all month. I feel more achy and tired weeks after.

Lynn

1 like
Reply
Kelliedye
Kelliedye
in reply to lynzer

I’m sorry Lynn. I was on Falsadex for many months. And I remember certain nurses were much better at it than others. Although I don’t remember feeling bad for weeks after. I’ll pray for less painful injections, and that you won’t feel sick after.

Blessings 🙏🏻💕😇

Kellie

1 like
Reply
lynzer
lynzer
in reply to Kelliedye

Thank you! ❤️

Reply
nstonerocks
nstonerocks
in reply to lynzer

I did read one of the side effects is flu like symptoms — body aches and fatigue? I don’t know if there is an equivalent drug to try but you should ask. Good luck!

Reply
lynzer
lynzer
in reply to nstonerocks

I’m waiting to be completely out of menopause to go on letrizole instead..

Reply
nstonerocks
nstonerocks
in reply to lynzer

I just switched from letrozole. It certainly is easier to take a pill. Hope that works better for you 💕

Reply
nstonerocks
nstonerocks
in reply to lynzer

I’m so post menopausal but still switched. Dr feels faslodex might be more effective for me w Ibrance.

Reply
lynzer
lynzer
in reply to nstonerocks

Interesting, my doc said it is more powerful so that’s a good thing but I get major side effects...trying to buck up. Getting blood now.

Reply
nstonerocks
nstonerocks
in reply to lynzer

Ok well fingers crossed for you. Treat yourself to something nice afterwards. It’s a dance keeping up with what works best. Please don’t get discouraged. 🙏

Reply
lynzer
lynzer
in reply to nstonerocks

Thanks, I appreciate the inspiration. I requested my favorite nurse, and she’s able to do it so at least that’s good! 👍

4 likes
Reply
harriet91
harriet91
in reply to lynzer

Agree with what was suggested for prep bringing the med to room temp does help. They also offered me some hot packs for me to sit on after the shots which was also nice

Reply
lynzer
lynzer
in reply to harriet91

Thanks, the hot packs really helped!!

1 like
Reply
Clair19
Clair19
in reply to lynzer

You know what I would mention that to the oncologist. I mean the Faslodex has been easier to deal with then anything I’ve tried. Some people just can’t take certain medicine. I can’t take any bone strengthening meds due to side effects. I’m just suggesting it, there are so many other meds out there. Good luck with what ever you decide.

Reply
lynzer
lynzer
in reply to Clair19

thanks!

Reply
Snowcone16

Can they numb it? I get zolodex injections. I always get numbed but nurse told me many women don’t. I joked “these are the same women who said ‘no epidural ‘

❤️

1 like
Reply
lynzer
lynzer
in reply to Snowcone16

I’ll ask next time! This nurse I had was great. She said her trick is to not only go slow with the needle but to inject through the fattiest part, next through the muscle. Still hurt but was way better and more tolerable. Thanks everyone for reaching out and sending me positive thoughts. ❤️❤️❤️❤️❤️

1 like
Reply
SophSP

Hi Lynzer,

I have not had that injection, but what I would say is that you should not have to be in pain and deal with nurses who are not sympathetic to how you feel. If the nurse you are dealing with does not listen to you, I would ask to see someone else.

When I had my first Zoladex injection at the hospital where I am being treated it was very painful. I have been having it at my local doctor's surgery every month since then and what I found out is that the hospital does not offer a local anaesthetic for it, whereas my local doctor's surgery does. My GP even said it's cruel not to offer pain relief to patients. So now I always get a local anaesthetic before the injection. Can you ask for that too? I have learned that you have to speak out and be your own advocate when it comes to getting the very best health care, as doctors and nurses are not always thinking about your comfort (they should), but how to just get on with things and move on to the next patient.

I hope your next injection does not cause you any anxiety or pain.

Sophie x

1 like
Reply
lynzer
lynzer
in reply to SophSP

Thanks! It wasn't as bad this time, phew!

Reply
diamags

Dear Lynzer, I've been getting these shots for 5 years. Some nurses are better than others. I used to get the zolodex, and believe me, next to zolodex, these are a day ar the beach! Other than malodorous urine I don't really have any side effects from them. Sometimes I hardly feel the shot on one side and the other hurts like "heck." I just tell myself that this is easier than the ultimate alternative right now.

2 likes
Reply
lynzer
lynzer
in reply to diamags

Thanks, hat is a great point! I gotta remember how bad chemo was.....

Reply
mariootsi

I have found that every nurse does give it differently! I think the trick is to relax the side that is getting the shot as much as possible. Put all your weight on your other leg. A tranquilizer before going helps!

Reply
lynzer
lynzer
in reply to mariootsi

hmmm a tranquilizer would be great!

Reply
PJBinMI

I was on Faslodex for over 9 years--it worked really well for me, and for the women I have known in person who were also dealing with E + mbc. I got all the advice that other people have mentioned: room temperature, taking weight off of hip that it is going into, and slow injection. Once I saw the written protocol that the nurses were to follow and it said the injection should be done slowly, at least two or three minutes per injection. I rarely had any injection site discomfort. I was also told that it can be helpful to drink extra water the day before, day of and day after the injections. (Plus, in the summer, it is easy to get a tad dehydrated without realizing it, and that can make side effects alot worse.) The first several times I got the injections, I needed naps the day of the shot and sometimes the day after, but over time, that got alot better. Maybe I'm odd, but personally, I liked getting monthly shots rather than daily pills that reminded me of the cancer. And maybe this is odd, too, but one of the decisions I made very early after getting this cancer diagnosis was to "make friends" with needles! I'd had a very upsetting experience with an IV when I was just 19 and very sick--it infiltrated and I think I must have had a mild PTSD like reaction to injections and needles after that. So I really worked on being able to relax about needles--injections, blood draws, all that stuff that goes along with having cancer. I had to pay attention to my breathing and tensing muscles and learn to relax. I have gotten to the point of even being able to watch the needle enter my body without tensing up and I'm really kinda proud of myself about that, of all the stupid silly things to be proud of! lol But I figure there is enough to worry about with mbc and I need to relax about everything I possibly can.

1 like
Reply
lynzer
lynzer
in reply to PJBinMI

Thanks! I was able to get through it with everyone’s advice and a good nurse! Phew! Phew 😅

Reply
SeattleMom

Good morning, lynzer!

Are nurses injecting into “belly fat?” My first couple of injections were done in my arm and they were painful, too, and left my arm sore. But the third time the nurse suggested the belly area and it was a piece of cake.

I do, like you, have the aching joints for a few days after. I just started visualizing the meds entering my bones and providing strength (which is exactly what they’re doing.)

I hope your anxiety subsides! Bless you!

XXOO Linda

1 like
Reply
lynzer
lynzer
in reply to SeattleMom

thanks!

Reply

I think my nurses hate giving me the shots worse than I do getting them. I am on 125 mg so I get two needles at the same time. The protocol is to slowly inject them. Mine warms them up first with heated blankets and then two nurses will do the injection slowly. Afterwards they always rub the area so the medicine doesn't get built up in one area as it is fairly thick. I have been getting these for 10 months now and only once did it hurt so the next month I told them where not to insert the needle. My advice is to work with your nurses and tell them where it hurt last time so they can avoid that area. Good Luck!

2 likes
Reply
NPmary

Tat Sucks !

Reply
SeattleMom

Dear, lynzer! I mistakenly was describing my Xgeva injection. After reading about Faslodex, I see that it is not the same drug (I am terrible with the multiple names for these drugs.) But the procedure described by nstonerocks above is exactly how my nurse does injection in my belly—slowly with needle at room temperature. Hope all goes well! XOXO Linda

Reply
lynzer
lynzer
in reply to SeattleMom

Thanks Linda, I actually get both...the xgeva isn’t as bad for me tho

1 like
Reply
2muchsqueeze

It is a lot to keep up with and I get both meds plus take ibrance. I was fine with xgeva and anastrozole, but no longer taking anastrozole, but ibrance and faslodex instead with xgeva. Xgeva was fine until the new 2 meds. It makes it hard to pinpoint which symptoms are coming from what med. I suspect my xgeva is not mixing well with the faslodex and ibrance. The side effects all have a lot in common. The week I had faslodex without an xgeva shot was less achy. Going on 3 years with xgeva and I think I may be done with it sooner than December when I am supposed to stop.

Reply
Kimr2081

I was on Faslodex for 11 years and never had any side effects. Now I did have a nurse or two who weren't very good at giving the shots but for the most part everyone who gave them to me was great. They always warmed up the liquid and then had me lean on the side that wasn't getting the shot and then switched for the other side. Honestly, if you keep getting the person who makes it hurt I would say something because I really don't think it needs to be that painful. Good luck.

Reply
Clair19

Sorry to hear that you hate the Faslodex. I was the same way at first. Most everyone here that gets them went through this. After 5 months I actually don’t mind them because after 2 months I started feeling better. I also put a few pounds on so now I don’t feel them. Make sure you take your weight off the side you get them on and warm them up yourself. I take a good 20 min to rub them shake and rub up on arms. I get hot flashes and I’m always warm. I noticed the higher up your hip the less pain, and to the side. As long as it’s given IM. When they put it in low I couldn’t sit, so I asked to go higher where I did not sit, it works for me. Good luck! What else do ya take?

1 like
Reply
Klamato

I did fell that way too except when a nurse told me to turn my toes into each other, it truly works by taking the pressure off,. No problem now. I hated those injections too , but now I can tolerate them, just ame deep breathes!

Reply
Mini9045

Hi,

Sorry the Faslodex shot hurts you!

I get two Faslodex injections and xgeva.

The nurses are great.

I get xgeva in my stomach.

Two nurses give me the warmed faslodex, simultaneously in my upper butt, by the hips.

If they aren’t giving your shot/shots into you upper buttox area I would recommend trying that.

The shot areas are a little tender the next day or two if I touch them but nothing terrible.

I hope they figure out a way to make you more comfortable!

Sincerely,

Ann

Reply
Nelsonyong

Hi Lynzer, my mom has received 2 jabs. She said only very slight pain. What her nurse did was to replace the original needles with a smaller one, so 21G. This helps take away lots of pain. Try discuss with your nurse if this is possible. The nurse need more strength and effort for injection, but the return to patients is abundant. Take care!

Reply
mariootsi

I have learned to take a tranquilizer befors I go for my shot. I also relax my leg and it helps! Good luck!

Reply
Cshipley123

I get a monthly shot of Lupron. I take ibrance and letrozole as well. It’s an easy shot and only stings for a moment while getting it.

Reply

I was lucky as I barely felt them. I get medical care in two different cities and in both cities, I was lucky to have little discomfort. However, the drug itself, did not work for me. Neither did the Ibrance. I had polio, all three viruses, being one of the few people in the world to survive all three. I now have a brain balance problem which is pretty severe. I was told that the drugs that I have received for the cancer treatment could have caused this since I also had bulbar polio. I hesitate to use any more chemo drugs as they seem to hurt more than help. I also have had luck with Metformin getting rid of skin cancer on my stomach just after a week on it. My oncologist was surprised while looking at my liver scan. I have three mets, two of them got larger, but one looks like it might be dying. He said it was darker in the middle and had just started to draw a white line around the cell, indicating that it may be dying. I had been on the Metformin for a month. He wants me to go on Xeloda, but I am not very strong because of the damage from the polio. For now, I just want to be on the Metformin. I also have bone mets, they didn't regress or progress.

Reply

You may also like...