Restless Legs Syndrome
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Prolotherapy Treatments

Has anyone on this forum actually had Prolotherapy treatments on their knee or ankle for arthritis pain instead of knee replacement or ankle fusion? It was mention by someone o few weeks ago but I never saw a follow up post. I have an appointment with a Prolotherapy doctor in April—just to explore the possibility of doing it to avoid a knee replacement. I’ve read that it may work to eliminate pain, but that the injections are also very painful. It is not covered by insurance here in the US. What about UK?

Thanks in advance for any information or experiences anyone can share regarding this somewhat controversial therapy.

Bganim1948

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I suggest that you try posting on Pain Concern.

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Yes, I have also heard Prolotherapy is painful but Prolozone injections are not, and they work!! Find someone who is trained and pursue that. I have had 2 in each knee and it works!!!! I have osteoarthritis in both knees and the orthopedic surgeon said Knee Replacement. Then I found a PA trained in Prolozone ( research it- using ozone ) and she said many people only need 1 shot , up to 3 in each knee. It takes pain away and heals the joint allowing cartilage to regrow on the bone . Effects last and hopefully no replacement needed. Her dad is an orthopedic surgeon and backs her work 100 %. Good luck.

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What do you mean that Prolotherapy is painful, but Prolozone injections are not? Aren’t they the same thing? Please explain. I have found a well trained doctor or so I hear, I just haven seen him yet. I have an appointment coming up. It is not covered by insurance in the US, but if it works, I don’t care. Tell me more please. Where are you?

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Prolozone injects ozone. My understanding of Prolotherapy is to introduce an irritant that causes inflammation. They are very different. Do a search of each to clarify.

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I have paid $150 out of my pocket for each injection.

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Okay that does clarify it. Thank you. Just one more question please: I live on The US, Rhode Island. These injection are not covered by Medicare or my secondary insurance, Blue Cross. So I have to pay the full amount of $300 per injection. I don’t mind the cost even if I need more that one or two if it really works as well as you and others say.

This is very hopeful to me since I have had some bad surgical experiences. So Kayakcarole, where do you live that you only pay $150? You must be in the UK or ??

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I live near Madison WI

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I have had both to try to avoid knee replacement. The prolotherapy is injected into the muscles around the knee and can be rather painful. It did not turn out to be very helpful for me. The prolozone therapy which I had last year has been a game changer. I have had two hip replacements and was definitely not looking forward to the probability of a knee replacement. I had a limp and a somewhat bent leg at the knee that I was unable to completely straighten. Prolozone is injected directly into the joint and is not very painful. I had about 7 treatments. From my understanding, you usually need more than 2 or 3 and my practitioner told me that most people need a booster occasionally; the return of some pain tells you that it's needed. She told me that for most people it's maybe 6 months to a year before you need a "booster." I no longer am considering knee replacement. I don't limp anymore and my leg has straightened out somewhat. I think that a well-trained practitioner is a must. She also had me follow an anti-inflammatory diet during the treatment. I live in South Carolina and I think my treatments were about $150. I would highly recommend it; it was well worth the expense for me.

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Wow you explained the difference between the two treatments so well, thank you.

I was led to understand that Prolozone Therapy was not covered by insurance, yet you only paid $150. I was quoted $300 per treatment. Did your insurance cover partial payment?

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Just checked to be sure, and I paid $135 for one knee injection. On the first visit only, I paid an additional $100 for discussing my history and an exam to be sure I was a candidate. My insurance did not cover anything. It's possible that some insurances may cover it depending on how the doctor codes it, but my practitioner's office told me they didn't know any insurance that covers it. When I had my prolotherapy, it was coded as an injection for pain, and my insurance at the time paid some. $300 sounds very high to me. Here is the website where I found my practitioner: oxygenhealingtherapies.com/...

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