Deep brain stimulation research

Hi all - I've just been browsing through Pubmed and came across this study clinph-journal.com/article/... I can't access the full article, only the abstract that states 'ppn deep brain stimulation has emerged as a potential treatment for balance disorders'. It specifically mentions that it may improve symptoms of PSP. It's a new article, dated this month....anyone know anything more about it please?

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  • Our neurologist, Diane Apetauerova, was turning to that after the CoQ10 study was done, with so little yield. My understanding was the initial results for the stimulation weren't promising, better for PD than PSP. That was not recent, so I will go looking for more info. Thanks! Ec

  • Thanks for posting that.

    Sorry I don't know anything other than your post.

    Best

    Liz

  • I just found where they are finding gut bacteria to have the ability to create the PD in PD free mice. They (Dr Sarkis Mazmanian of Cal Tech, and others) already know that 70% of all the peripheral nervous system, those not in the brain or spinal cord, are in the intestines. And the guts nervous system is directly linked to the central nervous system through the Vagus nerve. They are researching germ free mice who are introduce to to gut bacteria of people with PD. Researchers have found an increase in those germ free mice to start exhibiting symptoms of PD!

    Said Dr Mazmanian, "The fact that you can transplant the microbiome (gut bacteria) from humans to mice and transfer symptoms suggest that bacteria are a major contributor to the disease"

    This information was taken from an article on a site called 'Healthline"; but if you google "gut bacteria and PD" articles pop up!....

    Again what this has to do with PSP maybe nothing. Or maybe something I thank you for posting this article , Sasmock.

    Ever Learning Not Enough,

    AVB

  • I believe completely that gut bacteria play a huge part. In 2011, 5 years before my dad was diagnosed, I ran a stool test and urine organic acids test on him - it showed a really bad imbalance in gut bacteria then. He's always had a very sweet tooth, and liked his beer....not a great combination for sorting out the gut bugs unfortunately! Getting him to take probiotics was hard, and he'd only ever stick to any sort of eating plan for about 2 weeks before falling back in the sugary stuff big time. Got him on probiotics now...for what it's worth...!

  • Yes ! totally agree. I have a friend and many acquaintances who are morbidly obese...I knew there had to be something not being metabolized that was turning it into fat! I just read where they feel diabetes and obesity could or do have links to a poor microbiome. This may be old news for some but for me it answers a big question (no puns meant) ...When you see obese children, you know that it is not because of their own poor choices....We had a kindergartner who could not get up off the classroom mat....She was 5! I knew her mom..granted they did not eat healthily , still the older sister, who ate same food , was not fat!

    Obesity aside, and I may not be right on this...just an observation, I have noticed that beer drinkers (myself included) have a bit of a sweet tooth.....and if it's not sweet sugar it's just simple sugar/carbohydrates ie potato chips, pasta , breads etc., of course it may be that ordering up some french fries and a coke is much more "satisfying" than a bowlful of legumes and purified water ahahaha

    AVB

  • theglutensummit.com/david-p...

    You may find this of interest. It is entitled "Eliminating Gluten as the 1st Step in Preventing Brain Conditions."

  • Dr Perlmutter is one of my heros! I'm gluten free myself, but I can't get dad off the stuff for love nor money. He did manage about 12 weeks, but then fell off the wagon. The hospice make lovely home made cakes and that doesn't help. He's beyond understanding now, why I'm trying to deny him his favourite foods, so I've kind of taken a step back. He did get really cross with me at one point, which was hurtful, but I suppose he can't understand. Everything about his early years diet, through to his adulthood, supports a dysbiotic gut environment so it all makes perfect sense to me. I like to have a reason for things happening, and can't just accept that PSP just 'happens'. As another interesting aside, I trained in iridology some years ago, but don't use it now in my practice as it has no 'scientific' basis. However....when I took a picture of my dad's irises in to the lecturer who was training me...he said the following.........(bear in mind at this point, dad had no PSP symptoms at all)...... "your dad will stiffen up, balance will be a problem. He is very rigid in his opinions and beliefs (true) and his body will follow this pattern. Any imbalance in the body will manifest in the head area". The scary thing is that I have almost exactly the same markings in my iris that my dad does!! So I'm gluten free, whole food, and I'm darned well sure that I'm going to be looking after those friendly critters in my gut!!!

  • I watched a tv show the other night where a Parkinsons sufferer had improved due to deep brain stimulation. However, I asked at the Parkinsons clinic about this when my husband was diagnosed withe CBD back in Jan of this year and was told it was unsuitable for CBD sufferers. I cannot understand this.

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