this doesn't sound great. but no one knows.... - PMRGCAuk

PMRGCAuk

13,880 members25,205 posts

this doesn't sound great. but no one knows....

yogabonnie profile image
yogabonnie

from the Washington Post article today. "prednisone, which is used to treat such conditions as arthritis in adults and breathing difficulties in children, appeared to result in a tenfold reduction in antibody production, regardless of the dose given if administered around the time of the vaccine.

“Right now, we’re telling them to pretend they weren’t vaccinated,” Kim said. “That is the easiest solution but it’s only a short-term one. The step beyond is: What do we do to mitigate this?”

I am going to get an antibody test today even though they say not to.. because I think if I HAVE them I will be less stressed knowing I have them than I will be stressed knowing I don't. Since I am stressed about it now!

115 Replies

Yes - I heard this. There was a study carried out in USA. The presentation was posted on here recently. Quite depressing. I’m going to try to find somewhere where I can get an antibody test too. I read that it is best done 4-6 weeks after the second jab.

I don’t want a home test as likely I will make a hash of it!

i have an appointment in an hour. I will report back on this post! although most of you will be sleeping soundly by the time I get home. ..

Wow! That was quick!!

we will see. If they give it to me.. in the end I dont think it is for vaccine.. but more if you think you had covid. but I assume they would be the same... but perhaps a different test.

I believe you need the IGg antibody test.

thanks. I will ask when i get there.! IGg.

Lloyds pharmacy blood test is a well rated blood test. £50. I did it and have got plenty of antibodies ! I was amazed. Well worth the money.

Make sure to put your hands in hot water first though or the blood won’t drip out!

Aha! That was probably where I went wrong!

Was this from a clinical trial, yogabonnie?Fingers crossed that your test will show antibodies 🤞🏼. We'll be waiting to hear the results.

yogabonnie profile image
yogabonnie in reply to 123-go

they get to prednisone towards the end of the article. washingtonpost.com/health/2...

HeronNS profile image
HeronNS in reply to 123-go

This was discussed on the forum a couple of weeks ago, pretty sure it is a proper study, but it was preliminary and involved not many participants. They released the findings because they are important.

HOWEVER this was just published in The Guardian - a new study demonstrates that the difference between the immune responses of the immunocompromised and the healthy subjects disappears AFTER THE SECOND DOSE!

theguardian.com/world/2021/...?

yogabonnie profile image
yogabonnie in reply to HeronNS

well I certainly like THAT article better!! thanks! I am more curious than ever now.. and will take the test. It is very reasonable. ($38) and at a clinic with results in 20 min. we shall see!! I also had COVID nails.... but that could be from the PMR too.

HeronNS profile image
HeronNS in reply to yogabonnie

Have you had both doses of Pfizer or Moderna? I don't think anything else is being used in the US at the moment?

yogabonnie profile image
yogabonnie in reply to HeronNS

I have had both doses of Pfizer . the second one on FEB 18

HeronNS profile image
HeronNS in reply to yogabonnie

Well, we all await your results with bated breath!

yogabonnie profile image
yogabonnie in reply to HeronNS

I wont be home until 5:30 which will be about 11:30 pm for you all. .. but if you get up in the night! look!

HeronNS profile image
HeronNS in reply to yogabonnie

I'll be here. it's 5:21 as I type this, in Atlantic Daylight Time 🌞

HeronNS profile image
HeronNS in reply to yogabonnie

They are hoping to shorten our gap from four months to three; at present I'm scheduled for second dose in late July!

yogabonnie profile image
yogabonnie in reply to HeronNS

yes my sister had a 3 month gap there in London.. but mine was only 3 weeks.

HeronNS profile image
HeronNS in reply to yogabonnie

The longer gap is no longer considered a liability - except for the immunocompromised.

HeronNS profile image
HeronNS in reply to yogabonnie

And for astrazeneca I think the three months was always considered fine

Mikb profile image
Mikb in reply to HeronNS

I had the Az and they still told me 4 months. That takes it to July.

HeronNS profile image
HeronNS in reply to Mikb

It probably is okay. It's the long gap in between waiting to be boosted which is worrying on a personal level, but in the long run we'll get there.

Boss302Fan profile image
Boss302Fan in reply to HeronNS

Paused using J&J temporarily due to quality control issue and the 6 women that died as a result of blood clots but for about the past week all three vaccines are being given in the US.

The test I just had yesterday ( cost $40 Cdn ) is a rapid screening test for Covid 19 ( not antibodies ) and is designed for anyone who has none of the criteria for Covid and therefore isn't eligible for regular testing. I took it out of curiosity and was -ve. We get the results in 20 minutes and, I think, maybe, this is what you are referring to.

mine was the IGg test for antibodies. and also for short term antibodies. I had the the long term. at minute clinic associated with Allina Health system I think...

Got it ! Much more useful than the one I had. It was the charge you quoted that misled me. If I had tested +ve there would have been a follow up IGg /Covid test for which there would have been no charge.

PMRpro profile image
PMRproAmbassador in reply to readingbooks

Different things I think - the pop-up tests are almost always antigen tests, showing if there is virus present, mostly live virus in enough quantity to make the test positive. Very low levels in the first few days may give a false negative and after recovery from the infection it may remain positive in response to fragments of dead virus being coughed up from the lungs, giving a false positive, The PCR test is more sensitive. Antibody tests show if you have HAD the virus and formed antibodies to it, the same as you hope for with the vaccine.

HeronNS profile image
HeronNS in reply to readingbooks

This is the test which Nova Scotians are getting at free pop-up test clinics. I've had two. Why did you have to pay? The federal gov has provided millions of these test kits to the provinces.

123-go profile image
123-go in reply to HeronNS

Thank you, Heron. That's encouraging!

PMRpro profile image
PMRproAmbassador

I have assumed from the start that, until they come out with some good figures, I am no better protected than I was pre-vaccine. I shan't be changing my behaviour at all. Because at any point as long as the infections remain high, a mutation can occur that escapes the protection afforded by the vaccines. And if and when that happens - we are back to where were were this time last year until they can develop a tweaked vaccine and, even more important. manufacture, distribute and administer it.

HeronNS profile image
HeronNS in reply to PMRpro

Me neither, especially until an awful lot more are vaccinated so we are surrounded by people with high immunity.

HeronNS profile image
HeronNS in reply to PMRpro

Actually Nova Scotia is a case study in what happens with a variant, in this case the B.1.1.7. We are relieved these days when our new case count is "only" 90. Pre-variant the "normal" count during a flare-up would be closer to 9 cases, and that worried us. We have always had really good protocol here, and most people have been compliant (there are always outriders but they are not very numerous here). Nevertheless this "wave" is taking a very long time to bring under control and the hospitals are filling up.

PMRpro profile image
PMRproAmbassador in reply to HeronNS

Your population is about double ours - and at one point we had over 800 new cases a day which was quite scary and that wasn't even the new variants. It took several weeks of lockdown to get it down and it seems to be stuck at something over 60 a day now. However - our hospitals are emptying ...

Pixix profile image
Pixix in reply to PMRpro

Good news!

HeronNS profile image
HeronNS in reply to PMRpro

That's pretty frightening! It's considered "good news" that our recoveries are now outnumbering new cases. Hospitalisations still increasing. When the "second wave" hit a few months ago, we went into lockdown, and within a couple of days, literally, the whole thing was under control. Basically the second wave barely registered and no one died. That is the difference between standard covid and the B.1.1.7 variant where we are actually now experiencing for the first time what the rest of the world has been facing for over a year. We are such a small jurisdiction already some non-covid ICU patients have had to be moved into other hospitals further from home. It's our lack of ability to deal with a catastrophic increase which has led to the extreme caution here. We've just been informed that until new cases are back to single digits, and hopefully 85% of the population who can be vaccinated has its first doses, there will be no easing of restrictions. 😨 If we'd be counting 800 cases a day I honestly think our hospitals would be looking, to scale, at the same kind of disaster New York faced in early days. Mind you, I've no idea how many of the cases being counted are asymptomatic or mild, because there's so much testing going on. Probably the hospital numbers are more significant and those have been worrying.

PMRpro profile image
PMRproAmbassador in reply to HeronNS

I don't think we got to the ICUs being full here - but all that required anaesthesiologists to do like the Pain Clinic was cancelled. I think a couple were sent to Austria, probably Innsbruck - not as many as last time though. The really scary bit this last time was that they were catching almost as many assymptomatic cases with the mass random testing as they were with people with symptoms - showing just how dangerous the mild cases are.

HeronNS profile image
HeronNS in reply to PMRpro

Exactly. The "pop-up" test site across the street at my public library has been there every day for a few weeks now. The library is closed, of course, but they funnel people through from one fire door to another. I've been there twice. Very efficient. Mostly volunteers staffing it. They don't publicly release numbers of presumptive positives from this testing, only the ones which are confirmed through the regular tests - to which presumptive cases are referred. It would be interesting to know how many are caught by the asymptomatic testing. About ten days ago the labs were overrun with tests and it took several days to clear up the backlog, so it's entirely possible if all those cases had been tabulated on the day they were actually done we'd have a had a day of close to 800. There were several days with over 200 and the rest until recently still in 3 figures. There have also been three people who died at home, one of which a person who didn't know they had covid. As a result of this they are no longer charging people for ambulance rides. About time. Most of the cases are concentrated in the municipality where I live, the capital city, with a population of about 430,000.

PMRpro profile image
PMRproAmbassador in reply to HeronNS

The online paper has a continuing article where they change the numbers and nothing else but it always says PCR tests done, antigen tests done, and positives for each. I assume all the antigen +ves are then checked with a PCR but won't be on the same day

HeronNS profile image
HeronNS in reply to PMRpro

Oh yes, they do tell us how many antigen tests were done, but not the number of those which are presumed positive. I think for a while most of the confirmed positives were first detected this way, showing how much community spread had been occurring. Serves us right - this all started a few weeks after our new Premier decided we should relax a number of restrictions. An object lesson for everyone else who thinks it's now safe to open up - with the variants it really isn't, even with high vaccination numbers. We can get a bit more relaxed, maybe like Nova Scotia was for so many months, but then there is that step too far....

PMRpro profile image
PMRproAmbassador in reply to HeronNS

I get the impression that regions/countries that didn't have it too badly last year got cocky - and our region was one, insisting on going a "special way" when Rome wanted to get tighter. But they haven't learned - look at England now.

HeronNS profile image
HeronNS in reply to PMRpro

Yes. And it was very interesting at the covid briefing where the lifting of restrictions was announced, our chief med officer stated that he was very worried, I think he even used the word scared, about the next few weeks. So, again, an object lesson for leaders to pay attention to the public health people, even if they don't like the message! I find it interesting that this new Premier of ours is not being given a harder time over this. He did change his tune very quickly, but it was too late by then. Perhaps the third wave would have happened anyway, but I bet it would have been more easily contained because far fewer people would have been exposed initially. Oh well, water under the bridge and all that. Eventually we'll get through it.

Pixix profile image
Pixix in reply to PMRpro

I think Bergamo was the area most inundated in the first wave. Our friends said it was like being in a war the ambulance sirens were continuous day and night and the military trucks were noisily grinding through small streets loaded with coffins.

PMRpro profile image
PMRproAmbassador in reply to Pixix

Strangely (well, to me at least) when there was some opening up, people were out on the streets, side by side, forming big crowds and the Bergamo/Milan area was as bad as anywhere else even though their figures were still high. And a few weeks later - the numbers were climbing again.

Pixix profile image
Pixix in reply to PMRpro

Yes! Our friends said they stayed in and were angry to see that happening!

Charlie1boy profile image
Charlie1boy in reply to PMRpro

Hi, Totally agree! There's nowt we can do about it now, except being sensible. No point in getting knickers in a twist at this stage!Paddy

PMRpro profile image
PMRproAmbassador in reply to Charlie1boy

But as I said to Pixix below - the gubmint could help a bit ...

Pixix profile image
Pixix in reply to PMRpro

Agree! 85 health authorities in the UK now have people sick with the Indian variant! If the spread doesn’t slow then we will be back in trouble soonish! But they don’t know how it acts regarding the vaccine. Most people in hospital are those who turned down the vaccine but were eligible for it but one patient had had both vaccines and still caught it...but is described as ‘frail’. Um. Caution for me, but it’s a personal choice atm! S x

PMRpro profile image
PMRproAmbassador in reply to Pixix

And the gubmint doesn't help - have you seen the headlines about continuing DIRECT flights from India since it was declared a red zone?

thelondoneconomic.com/news/...

None have landed in Italy since it took off in India - and it doesn't appear to be a problem so far although there are some cases. But they seem very keen to let UK tourists back in - with the knock-on effect that could have.

Pixix profile image
Pixix in reply to PMRpro

Unbelievable. Yes I think italy France and Greece all want uk tourists but those countries may just stay on the amber list. The Indian variant cases are now growing faster and I think the EU should put England on their red list!

Boss302Fan profile image
Boss302Fan in reply to PMRpro

I’m more of an optimist and believe there will be sufficient cross reactivity that we’ll still have decent protection against the viral mutations. Especially for those vaccines that provide 94-95% efficacy against the targeted virus. Won’t be surprised if we’ll need annual vaccinations like we do with influenza.

PMRpro profile image
PMRproAmbassador in reply to Boss302Fan

Depends what happens in the mutation - and the more it mutates, the further it can get from what they have. It;s what viruses do. But even just the extra infectivity is potentially disastrous - not because of just Covid but the potential occupancy of hospital beds stopping all the other things like cancer and other surgery.

Very good programme on BBC called Hospital from Coventry about them only being able to to do 2 emergency operations per day because of no ICU beds. Choosing who can have surgery and live, who not and potentially deteriorating so much they won't ...

Charlie1boy profile image
Charlie1boy in reply to PMRpro

Agreed - it's an excellent programme, and our local cancer hospital. I went there for radio therapy. The daughter of our local vicar is one of those who has had to decide which patients got into ITU! Not a pleasant duty.Paddy

PMRpro profile image
PMRproAmbassador in reply to Charlie1boy

Did you see the one last year from UCH (I think) - showed Petros, a member of the forum, when he was admitted for Covid. And the West Mids ambo service during the peak.

petros31 profile image
petros31 in reply to PMRpro

Thanks for the memory PMRPro. My recovery is OK. The Hospital film crew, Label1, are nominated for one of the 2021 TV BAFTAs.

I am just wondering if the vaccines affect sensitivity of the body to pred. I recently missed my midnight 5mg daily dose and woke at 6am with severe pain, hands, arms and ankles, just as when I started PMR, 10 years ago. I took the 'missed' dose immediately which cleared the pain in 4 hours. A previous missed dose was almost painless. (Vaccine -Pfizer)

PMRpro profile image
PMRproAmbassador in reply to petros31

How strange. Several people have reported flares - similar situation I suppose

Charlie1boy profile image
Charlie1boy in reply to PMRpro

Yes, I did. I think we've watched all the Hospital programmes. We sometimes wonder if the politicians ever see them, as they give a somewhat different perspective on occasions!Paddy

PMRpro profile image
PMRproAmbassador in reply to Charlie1boy

But even the Hospital programmes are fairly sanitised - judging by what my daughters and colleagues say ...

Charlie1boy profile image
Charlie1boy in reply to PMRpro

Yes, I can believe that! We will be watching the Channel Four documentary on Monday; it could be interesting.Paddy

PMRpro profile image
PMRproAmbassador in reply to Charlie1boy

I like the Ch 5(?) programmes too - Barnsley A&E is good and the Hull A&E at night is a real eye opener!!

Good luck sweetheart! I am sorry that you have been frightened. Let us know. 💜

I have antibodies! No idea how many was like a pregnancy test got the line across the iGg for positive! The guardian is right! Thanks for always being here for me! Xo

Meggsy profile image
Meggsy in reply to yogabonnie

👍👏👏👏

Great news.

Would you tell us more about your PMR- how long have you had it/ how many mg are you on at the moment? That might also be reassuring. Thank you. Sue

I have had PMR for 3.5 years. started at 15... went down to 2.5 a year ago then had a flare and back to 7.5 and difficulty dropping so now a year later am at 4mg. I had Pfizer shot Jan 25th and 2nd one on Feb 18th at 5 mg. and yesterday the antibody test said yes. No idea the AMOUNT of antibodies. I will still treat it all carefully. Will never take off mask in public indoor places (hardly go to them) and when I can go back to Sweden to visit grandkids I will be super careful getting there!

What brilliant news. Hurrah. Worth spending the money for some peace of mind.

yes and only $38 which for some reason they "refunded" to my credit card. Although that could be a glitch....but maybe health insurance *I am in USA with super expensive health plan.. picked it up.

Even better! I spoke to my GP and she said it wasn’t possible for me to get a test as they are only being done for research purposes. She suggested I speak to my Gastro consultant- in case they will do one at the hospital. I think that’s a long shot!

Lloyds pharmacy on line does a brilliant one for £50. It gives you the actual number of antibodies you have. It is a blood test. We were delighted with it. I had many more antibodies than my hubby who is on a blood cancer medication.

Thank you. I’ll have a look. Not much good at collecting blood from myself. Last time I tried anything like it, it took so long to fill it to the line that it all congealed! That’s why I wanted someone to do it for me!!

My diabetic son told me the secret, which is to steep your hands in very hot water for two or three minutes, dry them quickly and then " milk" the finger you have pierced. It worked!

Congratulations! Could I just ask what medication you are on?

Prednisone. I have had PMR for 3.5 years. started at 15... went down to 2.5 a year ago then had a flare and back to 7.5 and difficulty dropping so now a year later am at 4mg. I had Pfizer shot Jan 25th and 2nd one on Feb 18th at 5 mg. and yesterday the antibody test said yes. No idea the AMOUNT of antibodies. I will still treat it all carefully. Will never take off mask in public indoor places (hardly go to them) and when I can go back to Sweden to visit grandkids I will be super careful getting there!

My husband and I had our first vaccination at the end of March (the AZ one). We are in England. We took part in an antibodies test, done by BioTech. I was very pleased to see that my result showed I had some antibodies (the husband’s didn’t!)

yogabonnie profile image
yogabonnie in reply to AliD23

Is your husband on any drugs? I bet the antibodies came after the 2nd one. !!

That’s great news for you! I was very cheered by the Guardian article too. I also had done test for antibodies which showed positive after both AZ vaccines. Tentatively feeling I may be at less risk than was thought. 🌤

RoadTrip profile image
RoadTrip in reply to Rache

Agreed, same as you apart from both Pfizer vaccines. Guardian article reassuring, awaiting actual scientific paper, hopefully published soon.

Just sent off my antibody test. I will let everyone know the result in a couple of days.

yogabonnie profile image
yogabonnie in reply to Bridge31

Please do!!!

Smokeygirl profile image
Smokeygirl in reply to Bridge31

Good luck! Xxxx

yogabonnie profile image
yogabonnie in reply to Bridge31

did it come back?

Bridge31 profile image
Bridge31 in reply to yogabonnie

Yes .. I post about it when I got the result .It was 320U/ml

Good start to the day ..........................

Prednisone treats arthritis? Is that really true?

Rugger profile image
Rugger in reply to Constance13

Rheumatoid arthritis, not osteoarthritis.

yogabonnie profile image
yogabonnie in reply to Rugger

Isn't PMR a form of arthritis???

HeronNS profile image
HeronNS in reply to yogabonnie

It's always treated by rheumatologists and appears on arthritis websites, but isn't there a strong possibility it's really "vasculitis" - inflammation of blood vessels, not bones and joints? Not that switching to the umbrella of a different medical specialty would be likely to help us!

Rugger profile image
Rugger in reply to yogabonnie

Arteritis, not arthritis - as in GCA, Giant Cell Arteritis and LVV, Large Vessel Vasculitis, which are both part of a spectrum with PMR.

PMRpro profile image
PMRproAmbassador in reply to yogabonnie

No - a vasculitis, inflammation of blood vessels in general, arteritis is inflamed arteries. Arthritis is a disease of joints - PMR doesn't actually affect joints, just the synovium lining and surrounding soft tissues

mayoclinic.org/diseases-con....

HeronNS profile image
HeronNS in reply to Constance13

A higher (for me) dose of pred definitely makes OA pain go away, but at what cost? I try very hard to treat only the PMR part of my chronic pain conditions, but it is sometimes hard to sort them out. I feel better in myself, but not painfree, now that I'm back to 5 mg a day, and hope the PMR activity doesn't increase.

Constance13 profile image
Constance13 in reply to HeronNS

I have seronegative poly arthritis (as I think you know) as well as PMR and I don't think I've had one completely pain free day for 9 years. Of course age doesn't help.😏

I got an antibody test yesterday. I should have results by friday. 👍

yogabonnie profile image
yogabonnie in reply to Linny3

did it come?

Linny3 profile image
Linny3 in reply to yogabonnie

Yes I do have the antibodies

“…appeared to result in a tenfold reduction in antibody production, regardless of the dose given if administered around the time of the vaccine.”

I am totally confused…I’ve read that the normal amount of cortisol in a person is between 5-25 mcg/dL which equates to 0.05-0.25 mg/L and if multiply this by the average volume of blood of 5 liters works out to be 0.25mg - 1.25mg. I also seem to remember (dreamed?) that under various types of stress (emotional, infections, physical, etc.) the total amount of naturally produced cortisol could be as high as 30mg? Take this and apply the equivalency of Pred:Cortisol of 1:4 and that equates to 7.5mg Prednisone.

So extrapolate further, expect total cortisol to range between 0.25 - 30mg, or 5 - 600 mcg/dL. The higher the concentration the higher percent of immunosuppression.

So, now the question. If any dose of Prednisone has an order of magnitude reduction in the effectiveness of the vaccine, then by that statement if the body is having a natural immune response whereas it’s concentration in the body is 600 mcg/dL or equivalent to 7.5 mg Prednisone then it too would result in an order of magnitude reduction in vaccine effectiveness. If 1.25mg (25mcg/dL) Cortisol is the upper end of normal that would indicate taking >0.31 mg Prednisone would start having a negative impact on vaccine effectiveness regardless as to being so minute to be insignificant (at the lower doses).

So, if all those calculations are close to being correct, then I take issue with that conclusion stated in the article by the OP.

I take issue with any Qualitative conclusions. If someone can make that kind of statement, show me the relationship (in the form of a concentration curve) of percent vaccine effectiveness versus cortisol concentration in mcg/dL else don’t publish such claims. If insufficient data exists from well designed studies then either publish effect unknown (truth), insufficient data (Truth), or nothing at all. All these types of reports from too small datasets (or inadequately designed studies) only cause people possible undue worry (additional stress), possible refusal to get the vaccine (why bother won’t be effective and I could have serious side effects), etc. In other words it just puts out more misinformation and serves no useful purpose. Could be, maybe, possibly…wth!

Sorry, my rant for the month. Just one of my buttons got pushed.

PMRpro profile image
PMRproAmbassador in reply to Boss302Fan

The immunosuppressive effect of pred is much greater than that of cortisol so you can't really compare that.

Boss302Fan profile image
Boss302Fan in reply to PMRpro

Yes, about 4x correct?

PMRpro profile image
PMRproAmbassador in reply to Boss302Fan

Not sure offhand

Bridge31 profile image
Bridge31 in reply to Boss302Fan

Goodness me Boss, I bow to your knowledge on the subject.

Boss302Fan profile image
Boss302Fan in reply to Bridge31

Don’t bow to me, I’m just trying to weed through contradicting information.

Bridge31 profile image
Bridge31 in reply to Boss302Fan

It’s your calculations that I’m in awe of. I failed maths 0’Level 🙄

Yes , do it. I was on 8 mg when I had my antibody blood test and I’ve got loads. It was very reassuring! Everyone is different. Good luck!

The most important fact is that the UK vaccination programme has resulted in a massive reduction in both deaths and serious illness, including amongst the elderly, many of whom will have been on steroids when they received the jab(s). That proves the vaccines are working well.

PMRpro profile image
PMRproAmbassador in reply to AtopicGuy

I know quite a few over 60s - and the only ones on pred are the ones I know from the forums. I think it is a bit sweeping to say a lot of older patients are on steroids ...

piglette profile image
piglette in reply to PMRpro

I do seem to come across a lot of people on steroids, possibly because it is now of interest to me, they include cancer, Crohn’s, myasthenia gravis, COPD as well as PMR. One person who has just started a large dose, has a tumour in his brain which the doctors think was triggered by the Pfizer vaccine and made it fast growing and inoperable. The doctors could be talking rubbish of course.

PMRpro profile image
PMRproAmbassador in reply to piglette

Maybe I just know a healthy batch of people ;)

piglette profile image
piglette in reply to PMRpro

You are probably right. Everyone I meet now seems to tell me about their latest illness or their fiends’ latest illness, perhaps I am as bad. It seems to be a main topic of conversation now we have lost Trump.

PMRpro profile image
PMRproAmbassador in reply to piglette

Does tend to accompany advancing age ... ;)

piglette profile image
piglette in reply to PMRpro

I think that is true. In your 60s does seem young though.

PMRpro profile image
PMRproAmbassador in reply to piglette

True - but I do have family members who were in a worse state in their 50s than I am at nearly 69!!!!

AtopicGuy profile image
AtopicGuy in reply to PMRpro

The risk of dying from covid rises very rapidly with age. I was referring more to the care-home generation, say 75+. I'd expect a much higher proportion of those to be on steroids than 60 -75s.

PMRpro profile image
PMRproAmbassador in reply to AtopicGuy

Only if they have a relevant condition - and really there aren't that many for long term steroids.

Only just seen this, and yes, that's what I was told by consultant and also the doctor who gave me second AZ jab - "better than nothing",but proceed as if you haven't been done.

On 10mg of pred and had second jab a couple of weeks ago. I had a antibody test last week as part of a NHS research programme and showed positive for antibodies so there is hope....

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