Second opinion might be worth the fight - PMRGCAuk

PMRGCAuk
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Second opinion might be worth the fight

Singr
Singr

I've just had a second opinion after lodging a complaint about the first Rheumatologist and the inaccurate report he wrote. I've struggled with GPs who clearly don't understand the condition we have and have been misdiagnosed, given wrong information, wrong medication, omissions of medication needed yada yada yada...oh and told me to stop making PMR my life and you lot are a bunch of negative moaners.

I did feel that my symptoms extended beyond PMR and it may be right. New Rheumy thinks it might be fybromyalgia and not Osteo arthritis as first one said. He also wants me to see the senior consultant so that they can collaborate. So finally they are listening and giving it more consideration. Also doing what they should be doing ....consulting.

This time I did not feel insulted, belittled and treated like "the little woman".

Don't get me wrong, the fight has been costly. I'm exhausted but feeling we might get somewhere now.

Keep up the fight if you can. Get others to help you when you feel overwehlmed.

I really feel that we need some kind of advocacy services to help us.

5 Replies
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PMRpro
PMRproAmbassador

Unfortunately we have to be our own best advocates - I do my best to provide information for people to use but the cost of advocacy services would be way beyond the charity to provide and there is no-one else who would.

The baseline is that GPs must listen to a patient and not just assume this is old age - but some are keen to do that at age 51! But how you get through to them is beyond me.

Omanain
Omanain
in reply to PMRpro

My GP is fairly open about the fact that he doesn't really understand PMR. But then who does?!

The main points in his favour are 1) Even though I am a 71 year old woman he treats me with respect and doesn't patronise me and 2) He doesn't seem to feel threatened by my internet searches and considers the results.

For my part, I know time is limited so I always try to think things through before my appointments and make a list bullet points to take with me, and where possible limit it to one condition per visit.

I have in the past been in your position with another condition and I know just how truly depressing that can be. It can be hard to fight your corner when you have been unwell and in pain for some time. Singr has my outraged sympathy that the medical profession can still treat people this way.

PMRpro
PMRproAmbassador
in reply to Omanain

The point though is that a chronic condition potentially means a multiplicity of symptoms - so while I object to being told you can only mention one thing at a time as that that presupposes that I have already made a diagnosis to know which is most significant, it does mean I must get my thoughts together first.

It isn't a problem for me, you turn up on the day you need a doctor and wait, then get as long as you need to deal with everything. We have no appointments, secretaries or receptionists to negotiate. If she can't deal with it you will be sent to the local hospital emergency clinic. I realise that is a utopia for many - but I still have to have done my homework to spot her sins of omission or comission!!!!

Omanain
Omanain
in reply to PMRpro

Actually that was the system in London around 50 years ago. It worked really well. Now we are given 10 minute appointments and you know if you raise one more point towards the end of your time you won't feel it has been properly considered.

PMRpro
PMRproAmbassador
in reply to Omanain

Oh yes - I know the NHS used to be like that!

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