PMRGCAuk
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High Intensity Interval Training

So once again there is a flurry of interest in the media about the benefits of high intensity interval training. Especially as there's been a study showing it's particularly beneficial to older adults. A couple of years ago when I asked my physiotherapist about this she said it would be a bad idea for me. In fact I can't really imagine doing it. But the benefits seem so certain and impossible to get any other way. Do any of you do high intensity interval training, and if so, how has it been? Have you injured yourself? And is there any way to do it without having to use gym equipment?

Here's one account of how the study went:

aarp.org/health/healthy-liv...

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Thanks for this. I would be worried about injuring my already osteoporotic lumbarspine and hip though

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I think you'd only have to be careful of high impact. High intensity doesn't = high impact.

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Ah okay. Need to look into it more...

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I did high intensity training for 6 months (BEFORE PMR) and intend to do it again. it didn't take much. I used a nordic track or a rowing machine...but you can do it walking also.. you walk for 2 minutes at normal speed then each minute faster . faster fastest. then back to normal then faster faster faster then back to normal then faster faster faster and then 2 back to normal. and you are finished. (those might be wrong..but you get the idea) the whole thing was 20 min and I did it 3 x a week. (the other days I did weights the same way, easy, harder harder harder reps (but fewer each time and never too hard) Bodyforlife.com has the formula. AND it REALLY worked. the whole plan did. but alas I did not do it FOR LIFE .. !

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Thanks Yogabonnie. I think I could do the walking thing. Well, maybe not today with greasy snow underfoot, but most of the year. 🤔😎 I'll run it past physio again when I see her in a couple of weeks.

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yes. check out body for life. It LOOKS complicated but once you do it a couple times it's easy. and good aerobic results and the weight results were great too. MIND you I was 55 when I did it ..but I am going to do it again with much more caution. Let me know what your physio says!

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We used to do it when I was in school. When they used to make you run then walk then run. I did used to do this when healthy and a modified version for a few years where I go as fast as I can for several mins then normal pace.

These days there isnt much difference between the speed but I try. Of course the most recent incarnation is fartlek training.

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Sounds like scout's pace. When I do that, in an effort to not miss the ferry for example, I usually pay for some days or weeks afterwards with a painful back. I tell ya, this aging business is no fun at all!

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"Getting old is not for sissies." - Bette Davis

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don't do it with the weighted vest on! (I shouldn't think....)

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Oh no, I don't even Nordic walk with the weighted vest!

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I usted to do HIIT before pmr. I usted a japanese method called Tabata..also an app that times work and rest cycles You can do HIIP on a thread mil , stationary bike or by walking at the top of your speed and then walking slowly for your rest cycle.

I managed to "normalize" my bp by doing HIIP..

Just read the other posts.. Sorry for the ditto..

HIIT really works in acfraction of the the time, though not sure how PMR -ridden muscles would respond to high intensity work!

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I have done Jillian Michael's 30 Day Shred and Beginners Shred and I am 71 and have PMR/GCA. It works but it is HARD!!! Start with beginners shred if going this way (I hate walking) but it does work. As others have said, you can do the High Intensity bit doing almost anything - walking, stationary bike - or with weights etc. I have never had any problem with a recurrence of PMR symptoms while doing it (off it at the moment because husband is ill and I am prioritising him - though that is an excuse, as it actually takes less than 30 minutes) but others who do still have symptoms might need to go carefully, but that goes for any form of exercise. At first when I did these DVDs I thought I was dying but I enjoy the challenge of it and the fact that within days I feel stronger, more energetic and less creaky. Also, after a month you can knock spots off the average 40-50 year old in fitness stakes. Very satisfying!

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Looked Shred program up and it seems to be more of a weight loss program, but is that just the marketing? I'm in this only to rejuvenate mitochondria!

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You may all find this article of interest:

senior-exercise-central.com...

senior-exercise-central.com...

Now looking at the way they build up the session I would suggest that maybe taking longer to get from Day 1 to the 30 min for the walking. What worries me though is the weight training - I know I'd have muscle pain doing sets of 12-15 reps with any amount of weight.

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Thanks PMRpro. Can't imagine doing weight lifting. At present I have physio exercises for rotator cuff issues in both arms! Neither serious because I've been careful but repetitive weight lifting is definitely out.

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Quite!!!!!

Mind you - it is possible to start with a couple of 500ml water bottles with just an ounce or two of water - even that is enough to have an effect.

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Unfortunately not at the moment.... I actually own wrist and ankle weights but I can't, for the time being, repetitively lift my arms with weights in them. :(

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That's what I'm saying - 12-15 reps is too much but you should start with 2, then 3 and so on.What you can do now is your baseline - then add one...

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Once my rotator cuffs are healed I'll start. I really can't right now. I can do push-ups (yes, "real" ones). I can push and pull, but I can't lift. It's sometimes painful just lifting the arm itself if I'm not in exactly the right position. The good side of this is I have a genuine reason not to clear snow!

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Then substitute what you can do...

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I think it will have to be pushing a vacuum cleaner around. Right after lunch. ;)

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:-(

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Thanks everyone. Good to know that a simple tweak of what I already do (walk) may be all I need. 😊

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I just use resistance bands provided by physio to do exercises. Find better than weights.

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I do this everyday climbing up and down the hill I live on, making connections to a bus, a ferry, a train and a half-mile walk to my Manhattan office. Not to mention 2 flights of stairs up and down at the beginning and end of each exit from the house - even just for taking out the trash or getting the mail.

Now there's also snow shoveling.

I think keeping on with my routine, PMR or not, pain or not, has contributed quite a lot to helping me stay pretty strong and fit. I stayed home on a couple of days when the ice/snow was too much of a threat for walking, but otherwise have done pretty well. I had to slow down some when I was having trouble with leg pain in Achilles and thighs, but the distances and heights didn't change. Only my pace. I adjusted as needed on a daily basis.

Everyone is different. But you won't know if this works for you until you try it. I think MODERATION is key, and then waiting to see how this manifests over the course of a few days.

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Exactly!!!!

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Good_grief, I was trying to find a way to do the intense activity. This would be in addition to, or a change to, exercise/activity I already do - and which, I have to say, already pretty well does me in for managing anything else...

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I think from what I have gathered from medics here (who are all very "in" to the role of exercise in recovery) that it is all relative. Your intense won't be the same as a 30 year olds intense. The aim is to increase the level at intervals.

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I tried High Intensity with a trainer one year after onset of PMR and on Prednisone. But essentially, I did not have the dexerity to do anything quickly (get into new positions on a machine, drop to the floor for sit ups, etc.) and my shoulders and knees were prone to injury. So we backed off the "intensity" part and adjusted all the exercises to avoid injury. Being in pain, I realized I would not have the motivation to exercise on a regular basis without investing in a trainer...

Now, a year after getting off of the prednisone, I do 30 minutes of weights moving from machine to machine very quickly, followed by 30 minutes of moderate aerobic activity...usually walking a hilly route, several times a week. I can't claim that it's high intensity but I do get my heart rate up. Alas, I have not regained my dexerity, am still in constant low level of pain, and my knees remain very prone to injury. (Rheumatologist is not sure why and we've agreed to take a wait and see approach). However, I do believe the exercise has helped keep me as healthy as I can be, and active, and I've managed to keep my weight in check.

I agree with others that you have to adjust to what works for you. Best to you!

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Well my symptoms began precisely 2 hours after doing a HIIT session of Joe Wicks absolute basics. I did i with relative ease, pushing myself particularly with the star jumps. Went for a hair cut and whilst sat in the chair realised I could not lift my arms. They felt like lead weights. As first thought had tendonitis or impingement syndrome but symptoms just got worst. Night sweats, severe upper arms and shoulder pain 6 Months later convinced this is PMR but my bloods are all bang on normal so Rheumy sending me to shoulder specialist but I am convinced I am one of a 6-15 % who present with normal blood picture. So... I would be scared of ever doing another HIIT session although I have always been pretty fit. Think it may have triggered my condition

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I wish I could remember where I saw it, but not long ago I I saw or read something which indicated that "high intensity" is whatever a particular individual can do. So high intensity shouldn't injure us. I was told, just walk as fast as I can for a couple of minutes when I go out for my regular walk, and that will be "high intensity" for me. Sounds more doable, doesn't it?

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Indeed!

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