Vitamin D Vs Depression: I've just... - Pernicious Anaemi...

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Vitamin D Vs Depression

Cubies
Cubies

I've just recieved a phone call from the GP office and my vitamin D levels are low again.

At first my vitamin B12 levels were low and I took B12 supplements for three months and then I had to take vitamin D supplements for a month and now I have to take another course of vitamin D supplements for a month. All while my doctor wants to diagnose me with depression.

The only thing that are contributing towards my recovery are the supplements.

What steps should I take to have proof that I am or am not depressed? (At this point in time I don't care if I am depressed or not I just want to make a swift recovery.)

21 Replies
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I'm having that ongoing battle. I say when I get a 'window' of feeling decent my mood is fine. Thank you for asking. As for your vitamin D perhaos just keep taking it regularly especially at this time of year. Mental health is high on the agenda at present it seems. The other thing I say is of course it's perfectly natural to feel low at times if ill. I know how tiresome it is and they by over asking can nearly drive you to it. Take care.

Clags
Clags in reply to Nackapan

Hi, In case you have absorption issues with VitD buy the spray for under your tongue from any wholefood shop. You absorb it through the big blood vessels which are near to the surface there as well as swallowing some. I aim to use it everyday all year round but still get my bloods checked in the winter to make sure my levels are good. It was recommended to me by a Consultant so I took his word for it and had immediate results.

Once deficient in vitamin D you may always need to supplement. Co-factors are also needed when supplementing, such as MK7 which is vitamin K2 (not to be taken with blood thinners, such as warfarin) and magnesium. These co-factors help direct calcium to the bones, instead of the arteries. Doctors aren't really that interested in vit deficiencies, so they aren't as clued up. A deficiency in D can make you feel awful, as can B12! I take about 8000 units of vitamin D daily with co-factors this time of year and it has made a difference to my well-being. Most people are likely to be vit D deficient when living in the UK, as sunny days are hard to come by! You can Google The Vitamin D council, which offers lots of advice of what levels should be and symptoms of low levels. (You don't need to donate to look through the site.) Hopefully using 'over the counter' supplements of vit D daily it can help you recover, as doctors only seem to prescribe it for a couple of weeks.

Cubies
Cubies in reply to greenbexy

You sound extremely knowledgeable and informed on the matter. Could I direct future questions to you?

greenbexy
greenbexy in reply to Cubies

You could, yes, but I'm not medically trained. I have only looked into this because I was fed up of feeling so unwell. There is a vitamin D group on Facebook, but it can be a little overbearing on the protocol, I read it and take what I need from it.

Cubies
Cubies in reply to greenbexy

Well there are certain food types that improve my energy levels for a short time. Such as chicken, liver, tomatoes, bananas, salmon and seafood sticks. Also drinking milk or water helps too. Do you have any insight on why this may be the case?

greenbexy
greenbexy in reply to Cubies

In all honesty, I'm not sure, most of them contain potassium, one of the electrolytes, which I believe is needed cellular, especially when we have had B12 deficiency, it is used when replacing red blood cells, which can be Macrocytic (large) because of the deficiency. Water probably also helps this process as blood work can show dehydration. I think it takes around three months to replace these cells.

I find pork especially gives me a boost, although it isn't my favourite meat, not sure if it contains anything different than other meats but I can certainly tell the difference. If what you eat works for you, keep at it. Everyone is different, in more ways than one, thankfully!

Cubies
Cubies in reply to greenbexy

Any reason why tomatoes in particular give me the most natural energy?

greenbexy
greenbexy in reply to Cubies

Tomatoes also contain potassium, a large one can have as much as 10% of the daily requirement.

Cubies
Cubies in reply to greenbexy

I've been eating six salad tomatoes a day, haha. I'm hoping that energy will be stored from absorbtion. I could happily eat twelve a day with them being cheap and how they make me feel.

greenbexy
greenbexy in reply to Cubies

Yes, I grew my own last year, very tasty just plucked from the vine!

Cubies
Cubies in reply to greenbexy

If a large tomato contains 10% of your daily requirement does that mean I should be eating ten a day?

greenbexy
greenbexy in reply to Cubies

I don't really think it works that way, a varied diet always works best.

Nackapan
Nackapan in reply to greenbexy

I like pork. I think it contains a good supply vit b6 and pottassium. B12 . One of the means good for thyroid problems. Apple sauce of course helps you absorb the iron

Cubies
Cubies in reply to Nackapan

If pork contains potassium just like tomatoes then I'll try eating pork too.

greenbexy
greenbexy in reply to Nackapan

I don't mind it, but would rather have a juicy steak (rare) with mushrooms and broccoli! Lol

Cubies
Cubies in reply to greenbexy

I'm Googling foods which are rich in potassium now. Haha. Any suggestions other than pork?

Nackapan
Nackapan in reply to Cubies

Baked potato with skin

Cubies
Cubies in reply to Nackapan

Damn I love snacking on a baked potato with cheese and beans, haha.

Hi Cubies,

BEFORE taking supplements of "vit D" please read this, slowly and carefully (I suggest):

fearlessparent.org/suppleme... - the calcidiol, the metabolite usually measured, CAN be low because there is an underlying, on-going immune response present - and this needs to be addressed in such cases, rather than just taking more "vit D" . Worth discussing this link with your health care provider !

Depending on one's overall clinical picture, whether an underlying immune response is present, perhaps resulting in a (probably undiagnosed) chronic inflammation causing or auto-immune type disease can be sussed out - BUT sadly, too often isn't ! ! ! In such a case, supplementation with "vit D" is NOT recommended by the body of opinion in the above introductory article.

All the best,

;-)

14 March 2019

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Thanks I'll bring it up with my doctor the next time I see him.

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