Mobility scooter anyone?

Afternoon all.

On Wednesday I was thoroughly fed up with myself at having to sit and rest all the time that I decided to take my dog for a wee walk - 20 minutes. Bad idea! Been in terrific pain ever since - I have been diagnosed with fibromyalgia and small fibre neuropathy. I have 2 questions 1) should I go down the path (pardon the pun) of a mobility scooter so that I can at least get out and about and 2) if so, can anyone recommend a folding one that I can put in my car? The reason that I ask question 1 is basically because I'm afraid to take this step as I'm afraid it will lead to even less mobilty on my part and a reliance on a scooter. As you can see I'm so confused with it all not to mention thorughly depressed. Any advice gratefully received. Thank you x x

14 Replies

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  • Hello meggiet

    I cannot give advice on the make of scooter, although you may be eligible for one on motorbility, if you get the mobility component of DLA.

    i do not know the new rules etc regarding above

    If you want to purchase one you can see some of them at the disability assessment centre within your your area, as many of them are weight restricted so that may cut the list down to size as I do not know what the weight lists are for these types of machine

    What you really need to ask yourself, are you wanting to carry it in the car

    Is it easy to dismantle

    Am I making this purchase for the right reasons, ie how much will I use this model

    Where do I want to go, is it just to shop or go for country walks with the dog on rough ground

    Will I get sufficient use of it. Many people purchase these then not use it or find it is not fit for purpose.

    One idea is to look in classifieds there are many up for sale second hand, these scooters seem to appear now and then.

    Some companies that sell them reconditioned. at a discount. so you may get a good one that way.

    One thing to watch with a private sale has it been not used over an extended period, and the owner has not kept the battery charged, this can mean that a new battery will need to be purchased. So a good buy can prove and expensive buy.

    Hope this will help, happy wizzing around

    BOB

  • Thanks for your help Bob. I just feel so isolated at the moment and the thought of being able to enjoy fresh air is so uplifting. We have a mobility shop near us so I may trundle along and, using your suggestions, have a try out on one. I have applied for DLA and am awaiting a response! Have a good weekend and thanks again.

  • Hello Maggiet

    Do not forget give me a beep, when passing, will get out of your way

    All the best

    BOB

  • He he will do. Might have a parp parp horn fitted!

  • I wrote this a while ago, but it's still as true today.

    I've started using my own scooter while out. I've decided that it's a positive step as -

    I can be out for a bit longer;

    I can get further;

    the pain is less;

    more quality time with friends as I'm not struggling to breathe/move/keep up;

    I get to be out where life is going on;

    I meet nice people who smile or pass a moment [eg "cold/hot today"] or ask if I can reach;

    I'm acknowledged as a person - not invisible, I exist!

    I get to be independent.

    I know there are negatives but they're the same as everyday when I'm on my crutch [es] so they aren't botherable [ I just made that word up! ]

    try the scooters out in supermarkets first. I hope this might help someone.

    regards,

    sandra.

  • Thank you so much for your reply. You don't know how much your reply means to me. My hubby is worried it will make me even more down as I will be relying on it. But the independence bit is the most important. I love your bit about trying one out in a supermarket. Adds here I come! Thanks again xx

  • you're welcome! you can often hire them for a week.

    or join shopmobility for about £20 a year, you can then book and use scooters across the country.

    sandra.

  • You're a font of all knowledge! Thank you very much x

  • nope, just joined it in the past :)

  • My mobility scooter is my independence, it means no one has to push me around town, I can keep up with everyone at a normal walking pace, I can enjoy the river paths again and take my camera out alone.

    Mine breaks into 5 pieces making it light and easy to lift into the car and has a range of about 20 miles. I bought it second hand for 350 pound and it is worth every penny. Go around mobility shops and do your research before you buy. Make sure it is suitable for what you need it do.

    It certainly does not make you reliant it energises you to get out and be part of life.

  • Thank you very much for your reply, it has certainly made me even more sure that it's what I need to get my life back. If you could message me the make and model that would be great. Thanks again xx

  • Mine is a pride and go with a bigger battery pack and 10 inch wheels hope that helps.

  • Hi Maggiet, I would just like to say I purchased a scooter from mobility shop in centre of Manchester, and it is an absolute life line for me I love it and I'm only 36, I was afraid at first about it putting my progress with my recovery back, and it's proved the opposite in fact, I had bigger batteries put on mine so I can go a lot further on it, I use it to go shopping, get my hair done, for hospital appointments, even to the gym, if you struggle to walk any distance like I do, then you will find a scooter gives you a quite a lot of independence back, so go for I say x

  • Oh thank you for that. I'm definitely now looking into getting one. I haven't had any negative replies at all. I just feel so trapped. I can drive, but when I get to my destination it's too painful to walk anywhere!! I've just been refused DLA so I'll have to find the money for it myself. I'm so pleased for you that you can get out and enjoy life more. xx

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