Chemo after optimal debulking: When I had chemo... - My Ovacome

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Chemo after optimal debulking

JenSA
JenSA
10 Replies

When I had chemo before the debulking surgery I felt positive and strong. Now a month after debulking surgery I have started with chemo again. I'm struggling to feel positive because I'm told everything was removed so I feel like I'm allowing my body to be poisoned! I need to get my head in the right place to cope with this again. Did anyone else feel like this. Help please.

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lyn1987

Morning - I am also just recovering from debulking surgery and due to restart chemo in a couple of weeks time. I was told that although NED after surgery there were microscopic spots left that may be scar tissue or disease, they cant be sure, the mop up is to attack these just in case. I am hating the thought of returning to Chemo but I now it is part of the treatment and I was determined to see it out to the end, no matter what, you have come thus far so a few more chemo will round off your treatment, and you hopefully will go into remission, that's my plan! Take care Lyn x

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Manchesterlady

Morning Jen , I felt just the same . I was told no visable disease after surgery, and felt better for the weeks of no chemo. Went to see the prof at Christie’s and his word were , im pleading with you to have the final 3 treatments, you’ve come so fat , and this is your best chance . So really there is no arguing with him !!i know it’s hard to go back to having the treatment, but at least you can see an end to it .i have my scan in two weeks time , and I know I’ll be a nervous wreck again 😳😳 . Good luck .

Sheila xx

Should have said , so far . Not so fat! Although I am fat now after all the steroids .x

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Lindaura

Dear Jen,

The last two or three rounds of Chemo are tough, but they are not just protocol. They are not just a waste of NHS or Insurance Company funds.

They are NECESSARY to find and destroy any nascent, invisible to the scanner, CANCER cells, hiding in your body.

This poison will feel horrible, but you need it to stay as clear from cancer as possible for as long as possible and you should embrace it.

No one wants to go through Chemo, and I for one, had a terrible time in it, with bone pain, extreme fatigue and dizziness, but it is simply something to get through.

When it’s over, you get to recover. Your hair will grow back, the poison will leave your body, you’ll grow stronger, and you will be in the best position to keep this awful cancer at bay.

Keep yourself informed, and posting here is a good start, and co- operate with your care team, so that you will have the very best outcome.

Best wishes,

Laura

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Maxjor

Hi Jen--I had a hard time with debulking surgery pain and when they said I had to start in 2 weeks, I nearly fell off my bed. Could not imagine, felt good that "they got it all" and just did not want to start again (like you, had it before and then after debulking). What my surgeon said is that there are "strands of sand" in there, that was not visible to his eye during surgery and to "mop it all up" they do the remaining rounds. My ca125 is right now a good indicator for me and my ca125, although 14 after surgery (two tests after surgery--its higher right after due to swelling in the abdomen) went down to 5. If you can think of it as part of the entire process for you to get to full remission. You have a mission! oxox

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Jo-Jo1-UK

It is very daunting to face chemotherapy again when you already feel unwell after debulking surgery. What you have been through is bound to affect you emotionally, it’s hard to stay positive all of the time especially when your feeling so poorly. I was very ill post surgery and after a short break had all 6 chemo treatments. It was tough but it is doable and 2 years on I’m doing well! It’s good to hear your surgery was a success with no evidence of disease but like the other say, the final step in the process is to ensure if there are microscopic cells left, these are treated with the chemo. You are two thirds of the way through your treatment now which is a great achievement, before you know it those last 3 sessions will be done! You will get through it, take all the help you can! Hope it goes well and you can soon start your journey to recovery. Best wishes, Jo xx

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JenSA

Thank you SO much ladies. This is just what I needed to hear. x

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sticky3006

Hello JenSA, I told myself that I'd feel a bit rubbish around day 4-8 and then after then I'd start to feel more 'normal' again. I went for long walks most days (I know everybody just can't face this) but I feel that this really helped. Be kind to yourself, eat whatever it is you fancy and pre record a few things to watch if you're feeling rubbish. I thought the whole process went quite quickly and before I knew it the last three chemo's were over x

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Lyndy

I know it’s hard JenSA but they are trying to give you the best chance of being NED forever....that’s worth a bit of discomfort for a few weeks surely? I had 10 weeks after TAH before doing two last chemos..boy was it hard work but I felt a real achievement once it was done xx

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BellmoreBelle

It souns like you had chemo first and then debulking surgery, with the additional chemo to follow. I had surgery first, with 6 cycles of chemo planned for afterwards. Like many writers in this thread, I was deeply puzzled that though described as "microscopically clear", I had to have chemo. I stopped it after 4 cycles (the clinic insists on calling it 3, after the last was a reduced dose due to escalating neuropathy AND the carboplatin had to be stopped and started as I developed an allergic reaction. It was 4). I had a choice, and I took it. I'm still here, 2 years on, NED. However, there's a world of difference between having the surgery first and following it up with chemo, and having the surgery in the middle as you have. I based my rationale for for stopping at no.4 because you ladies only do 3 cycles post surgery! I was therefore ahead, so I quit. Ultimately, it's a personal decision. The dubious statistics my oncologist told me just made me more determined to hold fast. I have so much admiration for all of you who are doing this the "hard way around", you are amazing.

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Nicky100

I ABSOLUTELY felt like you do! It is perfectly normal so do not worry! It will pass as you move through chemo. Your body is going through huge events and chemical changes and everything will feel different.Try and be kind to yourself and find gentle things that bring happiness: a pet, a friend, music etc. Love Nicky xx

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