Some Tips

I’m very pleased to notice that a lot of people are still talking up the “knowledge is power mantra” recently but saddened to note the direction that people are pointing to seek out the knowledge ie pharmaceutical and NHS web data, sorry, there’s nothing there that’s going to help….

Read, learn, re-read, trawl and read again. Someone somewhere has written it in a way that will click and you can then stand outside with the smokers happily chatting and having no wish to smoke. If Allen Carr doesn’t work try Neil Casey then Chris Holmes then Joel Spitzer etc etc. Sure they don't all agree but someone somewhere will have put it in words or ways that instantly focus your will.

There’s even fabulous data on this very forum but it’s nigh on impossible to find it.

Huge Tip 1 - know the enemy

Nicotine is about as addictive as brass-rubbing but less fun. Your dependency on having the stuff in your bloodstream is broken over a weekend, leaves you feeling a little odd and a bit flu like.

If you want to spend months thinking you’re fighting withdrawal from nicotine, well it’s a free country, but I don’t envy your task.

Huge Tip 2 - he's not the Messiah, he's a very naughty habit.

Smoking is a compulsive, horrible, smelly habit. To pretend it’s anything else is giving it the strength to fight back. Accept that your mind will demand that you smoke and be prepared to distract it. Success is far from guaranteed but understanding the battle plan is a huge chunk of the fight.

Huge Tip 3 - Never big it up

Read Eric Clapton’s autobiography and watch as chapter after chapter he battles with his addiction to class A drugs and his failing relationships but then stare in disbelief as he quits smoking in one casual sentence…

;)

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  • Interesting, but I think the bigger enemy than nicotine is tar, which is more harmful. Although nicotine causes addiction to cigarettes.

  • Merrhap

    So only God-fearing Christians can quit? What about non-believers?

  • Merrhap

    So only God-fearing Christians can quit? What about non-believers?

    Looks like our friend has nipped of for a prayer!!! :rolleyes:

  • your body is for Him only

    Being a male of the species i'm not too enthralled by this statement!!!!

  • your body is for Him only

    Being a male of the species i'm not too enthralled by this statement!!!!

    Oh come on Pete - it will only hurt for a minute!!:eek:

  • Tip

    hmmm...... yeh god, higher power, a power greater than ourselves? something out there??? I believe there is way more to life than meets the eye and my quit is all the proof i need.

  • your body is for Him only

    Oh come on Pete - it will only hurt for a minute!!:eek:

    Bragging again :rolleyes:

  • hmmmm, I see someone's gone and soiled an old thread of mine with God.

    Have people got no respect and decency these days? :mad:

  • Careful Austin!

    They let in Americans here....and some o' dem are creationists :eek:

    *Cav digs out steel helmet from cupboard under stairs

  • Bumped up this thread.

    Hi all - I've just bumped up this thread from Austinlegro. His post helped a lot ( as did most of his posts ) in helping me understand what was going on with nicotine and smoking. As a result, it was very effective in helping me quit. Hope it helps someone else in making that subconscious change.

    I’m very pleased to notice that a lot of people are still talking up the “knowledge is power mantra” recently but saddened to note the direction that people are pointing to seek out the knowledge ie pharmaceutical and NHS web data, sorry, there’s nothing there that’s going to help….

    Read, learn, re-read, trawl and read again. Someone somewhere has written it in a way that will click and you can then stand outside with the smokers happily chatting and having no wish to smoke. If Allen Carr doesn’t work try Neil Casey then Chris Holmes then Joel Spitzer etc etc. Sure they don't all agree but someone somewhere will have put it in words or ways that instantly focus your will.

    There’s even fabulous data on this very forum but it’s nigh on impossible to find it.

    Huge Tip 1 - know the enemy

    Nicotine is about as addictive as brass-rubbing but less fun. Your dependency on having the stuff in your bloodstream is broken over a weekend, leaves you feeling a little odd and a bit flu like.

    If you want to spend months thinking you’re fighting withdrawal from nicotine, well it’s a free country, but I don’t envy your task.

    Huge Tip 2 - he's not the Messiah, he's a very naughty habit.

    Smoking is a compulsive, horrible, smelly habit. To pretend it’s anything else is giving it the strength to fight back. Accept that your mind will demand that you smoke and be prepared to distract it. Success is far from guaranteed but understanding the battle plan is a huge chunk of the fight.

    Huge Tip 3 - Never big it up

    Read Eric Clapton’s autobiography and watch as chapter after chapter he battles with his addiction to class A drugs and his failing relationships but then stare in disbelief as he quits smoking in one casual sentence…

    ;)

  • Great thread, had to comment. I agree that the nhs etc don't give a lot of information or for me the irish version of the nhs would have you looking for your smokes after you put the phone down.

    I think reading and research helped me , the one that seemed to work when a sneaky trigger would lead to the desire to light up, was to acknowledge it, then refuse it. Whatever the trigger was didn't trigger again as my brain had already realised I could manage without this nicotine moment.

  • This is a good point

    Great thread, had to comment. I agree that the nhs etc don't give a lot of information or for me the irish version of the nhs would have you looking for your smokes after you put the phone down.

    I think reading and research helped me , the one that seemed to work when a sneaky trigger would lead to the desire to light up, was to acknowledge it, then refuse it. Whatever the trigger was didn't trigger again as my brain had already realised I could manage without this nicotine moment.

    Being aware of what's happening is really helpful cos it stops you being afraid and wondering if you'll be able to deal with it. Acknowledge it, maybe try to reason where it came from, then refuse it, great advice.

    Some people would call this mindfulness or awareness or wisdom - Any other suggestions ?

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