Macular Society

Anyone get 2 injections for Wet Macular on each visit?

Does anyone else get 2 injections at EACH visit? I didn't realize that my doc was giving me a numbing medication type injection first, and then the Eyelea injection. He would first numb the eye with a Q tip solution before the injection, and I always feel pressure twice but did not realize it was because he uses 2 shots! I have had 6 visits so far and I worry about scarring, especially from 2 injections a month. I am in the US and wonder if the procedure is the same everywhere? Thanks!

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My SECOND Retina Doc (US teaching hospital) gives only ONE injection herself. She originally used Avastin, but when that eventually failed, she switched to Eylea.

I'm given numbing drops after the Snellen eye chart test. Then I'm given more after the OCT photography. Then finally, for numbing the drug injection area, a tiny cotton ball saturated with Lidocaine (anesthetic) is placed under the eyelid and I go back to the waiting room. Ten to fifteen minutes later, I'm called back in and my Retina Doc gives me the drug injection.

For me, there's much less eye trauma afterwards. My FIRST Retina Doc used to have Residents giving TWO injections. I changed Retina Docs because of that.

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kevinaki,

Thank you for the info! I will change my doc too!

One injection is bad enough, so I don't need two.

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Hi randym, I'm in UK. In preop room get anaesthetic drops then more in op room before inj.

Only when I switched to eye implant did I get anaesthetic drops plus anaesthetic inj prior to implant. First one worked well, didn't feel a thing, second not quite as good.

I think for normal eye inj I wouldn't want anaesthetic inj too, just plenty of drops!

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eyesright, Thanks for your reply. I am even more convinced to go to another doc now. I never heard of the anaesthetic drops being given. That sounds like a good alternative. i am mostly worried about 2 injections causing scar tissue over time.

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Give only ever had drops in eye and then injection. Amazed you have two injections . One is bad enough!

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RP1944, you are SO right...one is bad enough!

I am so glad I am learning more on this site from folks like you. Thanks!

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Not heard of an anaesthetic injection, at least, not here in the UK. It seems self defeating! I always have anaesthetic drops then the injection. Never feel anything other than a little pressure.

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Rennatk, Thanks for the reply. I have to find a doc who will only give the anaesthetic drops for pain. I never knew about the drops until now!

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One other thing to consider, if you continue to experience pain ask the doc to map areas of your eye hopefully to find the most comfiortable segment. Unfortunately, that does mean experimental shots but at least if one area is more comfortable you could insist on them staying with that.

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I have been getting 2 injections every visit for over 2 years now. The only problem I had was I have a bad reaction to Eylea and had to switch to another medication. The numbing injection is not going all the way into your eye. Only the outer part. I would hate to take the other injection without the numbing one. It is a very thing needle and I never feel it. I see him doing it but it doesn't hurt me. Eylea made my eye so sensitive to light I had to stay in bed for 3 to 4 days, with curtains closed, barely able to see to make it to the bathroom. Since we changed medications, that doesn't happen any more. As for the cotton under the eyelid someone mentioned, I doubt I could handle that. My eyelid was damaged during the multiple surgeries. It is sensitive to touch and doens't want to stay open already. I could not imagine putting a piece of cotton under it.

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fernowl, Sorry Eylea did not work for you and the nasty experience you had. I have just started Eylea because I was concerned about the Avastin not having FDA approval here in the US. I am curious about the size of both needles. I thought they were tiny and thin like an insulin needle or even smaller. I will find a new doc who will only give me the drops for now. If it is too painful, I guess I will have to have the Lidocaine numbing injection too. Thanks!

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Try to avoid a clinic which uses needles designed primarily for diabetics. These are often silicone coated for smoother painfree injection but, drops of silicone have been known to detach and result in permanent floaters. 😳

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Rennatk, Thanks, I heard of that silicone problem and now there are lawsuits regarding this. My doc states he never uses it. I still get floaters, but some go away in a week or so, but I do have some permanent ones in the one eye where I get the injections. I wish future research would come up with another treatment besides those horrible injections!

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I gather that there are up to 3 different drugs about to be trialled, but still injections sadly.

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