I have large painful rashes on my legs which krill oil has cleared up. It contains phospholipids though. Is it still safe to take?

It is the only thing that has worked for the rashes, which includes my scalp. My toes and foot are usually numb but the krill seems to have helped that too. I have taken it for a month now but am quite concerned about the phospholipids in this product. I can't find any information on the internet concerning its safety for Hughes syndrome patients. Any input would be greatly appreciated.

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  • An interesting question and one that we don't have the answer to, I'm afraid. I know that fish oils can affect your INR so it's important to let your GP know if you are taking supplements, but have not come across krill oil before.

    Please can you ask the manufacturers of this to look into it? I'd be happy to put them in touch with our medical advisory panel.

  • I have found three studies that although not directly linked to APS have some relevance to autoimmune, cardio vascular, stroke and inflammation. In one study they gave it to people who had cardiovascular disease. I could find nothing about mixing it with anticoagulation however so that would have to be viewed along the same lines as Omega 6 and Fish Oils.

    ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/173...

    ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/187...

    ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/193...

  • Thank you...I will read these links

  • Don't get weirded out by the word " phospholipid.". I know for a good year after my diagnosis I waited to react to something else since phospholipids are in every cell membrain on the planet. But the name," Antiphospholipid" is a bit misleading. It refers to a specific blood test reaction between our immune system and specific phospholipids found in platelet and capillary cell membranes.

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