gluten and yeast free?

2 weeks ago I was diagnosed as being gluten and yeast intolerant and since eliminating these from my diet i have been feeling much better. Does anyone have any suggestions for a bread substitute? As the gluten free bread/pittas/rolls/cakes/muffins etc all contain yeast. I find myself snacking regularly throughout the day as am never really full up!

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  • Hi Harriet, there are flat breads which do not use yeast and if you google for yeast free gluten free bread recipes you should find a few. You can also substitute wheat flour with gluten free flour.

    You can also make pancakes that are gluten and yeast free and you can make sweet and savoury ones. I love pancakes and have them for breakfast sometimes and with fresh fruit.

    There are many gluten free options that are really healthy like quinoa which's a very healthy alternative. There's also rice and potatoes.

    Most of us when we are first diagnosed only see what we can not eat and not what we can eat so it requires a change of attitude and time to adjust.

    Here's a list of flours that are wheat free and they say if they are also gluten free as obviously barley and rye are wheat free but not gluten free but it's a comprehensive list and the majority are gf:

    wheat-free.org/wheat-free-f...

    I hope this helps and do let us know how you get on.

  • Won't repeat what Jerry had already covered in good detail. You could make your own bread using GF flour and baking soda, rather than yeast. Watch out though if you have high blood pressure as increased Sodium levels could impact upon your blood pressure.

    In terms of yeast free, I take it you have been given guidance on this? Aside from the usual advice on breads, yeasts are common in some fruits, particularly in grapes. Mushrooms probably iffy too along with Marmite, Bovril, etc and of course alcohol :-(

  • Thanks for your advice! I will definitely be trying out the pancakes I hadn't even thought of that. Yep I think I am still in the early stages of just getting used to everything so I know what you mean about only thinking about what I can't eat. Yes I have been given guidance on the yeast, the alcohol issue is a bit of a shame except I think i can still have champagne and spirits.. :) This website has been really helpful!

  • Hi Harriet. I need to avoid yeast and have spent a long time looking for a bread recipe. I found a simple one in "The Everyday Wheat-free & Gluten-free Cookbook" by Michelle Berriedale-Johnson about 10 years ago! I have changed it over time and this is it, in case you want to try making bread. Mix 150 g buckwheat and 150 g chick pea flour with 75 g rice and 75g tapioca flour. Add 1 level tsp baking powder, 2 level tsp cream of tartar and a little sea salt. Measure out about 300 ml of milk (cow,rice or soy), add a beaten egg and about a tblsp oil (or rub in 1/2 tsp butter to flour). Mix really well with flour, add a little more liquid if necessary so that it is not too stiff. Put in a very well greased loaf tin and bake in middle of oven at 180 C or Gas Mark 4 for about 1 hour or until a skewer comes out clean. Let it cool slightly, then turn out onto a rack (or something similar). When it's completely cold put into a plastic wrapper and keep in the fridge for up to a week. It's got a dense texture but makes very good toast. There are more recipes on the net than when I started to look, so I hope you can find what you like! I sometimes use buckwheat for pancakes too. And Prosecco is a nice drink instead of champagne!

  • Hi Harriet. My daughter is yeast and gluten free. I use 450g of any gluten free bread flour mix such as Dove's. I add 2tsp salt. 2 tsp bicarb. equiv of 2 pots of natural yoghurt (about 250g). 1 tbsp olive oil. And enough warm water to make a very sloppy mixture. The denser the mixture the less the bread rises generally (if not using yeast of course). In some respects its like a cake mixture. I pour the mixture into individual quiche dishes and so when its cooked, it makes a bread roll size that I can freeze. I cook them at 200°C for 10 mins and then about 10 mins at 180°C. It depends on your oven. I also put a pot of water in the oven which gives a soft bread inside.

    I have recently made pizza bases doing the same mixture but spreading it out onto a baking tray and precooking before adding the topping and it was great.

    I also love Italian Socca bread which is made only with chickpea flour but chickpea flour tends to have quite a strong taste. grainfreeliving.com/recipes...

    There is also a recipe for pizza bases using mashed potato but I haven't had a go at that yet.

    I also have a recipe without gluten, dairy or yeast and it comes out really well too so anything is possible

    I must admit that when you are told you are yeast and gluten free, you wonder what you are going to eat but as the previous people have said, there are lots of recipes and websites. I found a lot of help on websites concerned with Candida as they are not allowed to eat yeast or anything such as mushrooms etc.

  • Hi, I have also been sensitive to yeast, but treat this inconvenience by drinking one pint of warm water with a tablespoon of organic apple cider first thing in the morning before your breakfast/tea/coffe. It cleanses your body inside out. After a year on this regime I got rid of all signs of candida, but I still keep drinking my ciderwater 'tea'. If you want to try it out, start with 5 ml of vinegar and slowly increase to 15 ml. Once you get used to it, it actually taste quite refreshing!

    I make pizza using G.F. pita bread and use a bought pasta sauce (chili, herbs and tomato) and a hard goats cheese, then add whatever I have at home.

  • Hey Harriet21, welcome to the allergy/sensitivity world! I recommend corn tortillas. The ones in any natural foods section of a grocery store will likely only contain corn and water. I love these because you can wrap just about anything in them and they do not have any additives that a lot of gluten free products have. They can be delicate and break easily, just heat them up before and you'll be good to go. Hope this helps!

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