Oat allergy and "Gluten-free" bread - Gluten Free Guerr...

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Oat allergy and "Gluten-free" bread

S11m
S11m
5 Replies

I do not (now) have much immediate reaction to gluten... but I called the doctor when I had my first ¿anaphalactic? "attack"... and he thought I had had a heart attack - and sent me off in an ambulance to the cardiac unit. Gluten allergy was diagnosed by a private allergy specialist - and it never registered with the Doctors.

For years I thought I was getting away with eating some gluten - but I was permanently bloated... I have now cut out gluten and lost 30Kg.

I am as intolerant of "gluten-free" bread as I am to real bread, and I think I also react to oats (before I was diagnosed, for some time I almost lived on oat muesli and sandwiches).

How common is "oat allergy" and intolerance of "gluten-free" bread?

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BabsyWabsy

Hi, I react badly to some so called gluten free bread (apart from the texture, yuk) and discovered that often, some brands contain Codex wheat starch, which is <20ppm gluten, so can legally be called gluten free. I can eat 100% rye sourdough with no problems at all, ditto spelt pasta, so I have concluded that my issue is modern wheat, not gluten. That could be the wheat itself, or the glyphosate that is commonly used to dry wheat off prior to harvest. Trying to explain this to my GP has been a non-starter. Sometimes you need to do your own research and experimentation to know what works for you. Become your own expert.

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Jerry

Hi S11m in Australia 23% of coeliac had a bad reaction to uncontaminated oats and all the children pulled out of the study.

In the EU it is deemed that 5% of coeliac are intolerant to oats.

There are also different strains of oats and their prolamin (protein) avenin levels vary.

Pure oats are ones tested to be below 20ppm However the problem is there is not a specific test for avenin in oats hordein in barley or secalin in rye so an ELISA wheat gluten test is used and is known to give very inaccurate results with malt and hydrolysed barley.

I don't eat pure oats or foods with allowable levels of gluten in and it works for me.

So good luck. 😊

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S11m
S11m
in reply to Jerry

Hi, Jerry, thanks… interesting.

¿You get all over HU?

So I am not the only one...

I think the Coeliac Society says “some people might also need to avoid oats”

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Costa49

Can’t believe that I just read your post ..I am exactly the same as far as gluten free bread & oats go. Haven’t actually been diagnosed as a celiac though as GPs here in England can’t be bothered with anything that’s a little bit difficult. Stopped eating gluten about 4 years ago and never looked back as it changed my life. Saying that I do fall off the wagon now and again. I tend to simply avoid anything that my body says no to,...it’s just a whole lot easier that way. 🙋🏻‍♀️

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Penel

Ready-made gluten free bread is also full of additives such as emulsifiers, gum, cellulose. None of them are good news for your gut.

Have a go at making your own?

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