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Diabetes India
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Effect of a high-egg diet on cardiometabolic risk factors in people with type 2 diabetes

academic.oup.com/ajcn/advan...

Abstract

Background

Some country guidelines recommend that people with type 2 diabetes (T2D) limit their consumption of eggs and cholesterol. Our previously published 3-mo weight-maintenance study showed that a high-egg (≥12 eggs/wk) diet compared with a low-egg diet (<2 eggs/wk) did not have adverse effects on cardiometabolic risk factors in adults with T2D.

Objective

The current study follows the previously published 3-mo weight-maintenance study and assessed the effects of the high-egg compared with the low-egg diets as part of a 3-mo weight-loss period, followed by a 6-mo follow-up period for a total duration of 12 mo.

Design

Participants with prediabetes or T2D (n = 128) were prescribed a 3-mo daily energy restriction of 2.1 MJ and a macronutrient-matched diet and instructed on specific types and quantities of foods to be consumed, with an emphasis on replacing saturated fats with monounsaturated and polyunsaturated fats. Participants were followed up at the 9- and 12-mo visits.

Results

From 3 to 12 mo the weight loss was similar (high-egg compared with low-egg diets: −3.1 ± 6.3 compared with −3.1 ± 5.2 kg; P = 0.48). There were no differences between groups in glycemia (plasma glucose, glycated hemoglobin, 1,5-anhydroglucitol), traditional serum lipids, markers of inflammation [high-sensitivity C-reactive protein, interleukin 6, soluble E-selectin (sE-Selectin)], oxidative stress (F2-isoprostanes), or adiponectin from 3 to 12 mo or from 0 to 12 mo.

Conclusions

People with prediabetes or T2D who consumed a 3-mo high-egg weight-loss diet with a 6-mo follow-up exhibited no adverse changes in cardiometabolic markers compared with those who consumed a low-egg weight-loss diet. A healthy diet based on population guidelines and including more eggs than currently recommended by some countries may be safely consumed. This trial is registered at anzctr.org.au/ as ACTRN12612001266853.

18 Replies
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Very interesting and great information on eggs.

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4 eggs/day with yolk, of course. :)

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What do you have with the eggs?

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Coffee

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Each meal?

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No.

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What do you have with the second set of eggs?

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Can be just coffee. Or if egg curry then some rice.

Normally boiled or omelet with coffee.

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I have 2 hard boiled eggs for breakfast every morning and a Greek yogurt.

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4 eggs in breakfast and 2 at dinner

If lucky then 2 more at lunch

Lipids are darn normal.

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Sounds great to me!😀👍

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It is proven that dietary cholesterol has very minimum impact on serum cholesterol... Most of the serum cholesterol is manufactured by liver..

And therefore dyslipidemia is sign of impaired liver health. It has got nothing to do with diet.

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Confused!

triglycerides seems to have direct correlation with liver. And egg yolks has considerable amount of it . So how come?

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TG is due to high carbs.

Nothing to do with egg yolks or with liver health. What gets liver to bad health? High Carbs and fructrose!

Cut the carbs and fruits and TG will fall like a rock as my guru used to say. Everything else is just noise.

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Fructose and liver? Thats shocking!!

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According to Dr. Lustig, Professor of Pediatrics in the Division of Endocrinology at the University of California, fructose is a "chronic, dose-dependent liver toxin." And just like alcohol, fructose is metabolized directly into fat – not cellular energy, like glucose.

So, it's a MYTH that fruits are healthy.

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Wonderful post Shashikantiyengar

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A key emphasis of the study was on replacing saturated fats with unsaturated fats. However, this is a bit of a red herring.

Body fat is 57% mono, 40% saturated and only 3% PUFA (because it is easily oxidised, that is why they are essential, to keep a regular turnover as they aren't retained in the body as well as the other fats). This is the ideal ratio of fat, evolved over millions of years.

Eating too many carbs disrupts this balance; the body producing too much visceral fat as a response in an attempt to keep that blood glucose down.

So, avoidance of natural fat is not just akin to fiddling whilst Rome burns, it has contributed to the very thing that leads to insulin resistance; eating too much sugar (which all carbohydrate converts to in the body).

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