Forgive him for he knows not what he does!

Forgive him for he knows not what he does!

Having run a grand total of 8 minutes (W1R1) in the last 20 years, I have just submitted my entry for the Tonbridge Half Marathon in October.

Rest assured, I am under no illusions on just how much work I have to do to get ready for this event but I think that actually having a confirmed entry will act as an extra incentive for me to push on with c25k and beyond.

My ultimate goal is to run the London or Brighton Marathon in 2016. If I can do that in under 4 and a half hours**, my employer and one of their competitors have each agreed to make a very sizeable contribution to cancer charities.

Being of Scottish origin wasting £20 on an entry (not to mention what I have 'invested' on shoes, clothing and gadgets in the last couple of weeks) would be complete anathema and would hurt even more than what I am going to subject my legs and lungs to over the next year and a bit.

** My legs turn to jelly just thinking about that target but I will give it 100%.

21 Replies

  • wow Exellent!! All the best with the preparation :-D . Where I can read more about graduating and those running events? - just wanna know whats ahead. :)

  • There are lots of sites with good info on organised events Moni but the one that I have found (so far) that looks most comprehensive is:

    In terms of what to do after graduation from c25k. Well I am a beginner too and will ask around for advice when I am getting close.

  • The first thing I think that you should do with your training over the next 6 months -- IS TO COMPLETELY FORGET ABOUT PACES AND EXPECTED/ANTICIPATED/DESIRED FINISHING TIMES. . Your sole goal at this stage is to finish the run in an upright position. And after you have completed the 9 weeks of C25k, can I suggest to you one of Jeff Galloway's 20 week run/walk half marathon training plans( for beginner runners)

  • I will definitely look into that Bazza. Thanks.

  • Just a follow up to your post Bazza.

    You advise to forget about pace but Jeff's Run/Walk/Run training program appears to be centred on a ratio of the "Magic Mile" time which does entail a pace target. That advice is repeated on Mr. Galloway's website. Am I missing something?

    Generally speaking that type of 20-week program looks exactly like what I need to do as a follow-up to c25k. Thanks again for the advice.

  • The "magic mile" component of Galloways programme is simply an attempt to ascertain what is a reasonable run/walk ratio for you. It is a bit early in your running career to even think about this bit right now. You will see that IF you were planning to try to finish a race at a certain pace, then he recommends certain ratios for different paces. Sometimes I feel that his explanatory wording to his programmes could be a bit better - for example read the wording at the top of his half marathon programme for beginners and then read the same wording at the top of his half marathon programme for experienced runners ( to finish in an upright position)

    I actually never ever used his Magic Mile component when I trained for a 14K race last year immediately after completing C25K. During the course of doing C25K , I came to realise and understand what a very "comfortable" pace for me was and which I believed I could maintain over the 14K. I then used the 20 week programme to build myself up to actually being able to run 14K ( as opposed to theorising about it :) ) - by adopting a ratio that concurred with his recommendations - ie 8 mins per K was a 2/1 ratio. So - my consideration of pace was not really an attempt to run the race at that pace - but just to finally decide what ratio of run/walk to use during training and the race itself. As it turned out , the excitement of the day caused me to run the race at 7:30 min per K - 30 seconds faster than what I had trained at.

  • Understood, thanks again.

    On the "as opposed to theorising about it" - yes the last thing I want to do is become an expert in 'talking the talk'. Over the next few weeks, I just need to find my running legs with c25k.

  • Kudos to you for the motivation and the answerability. Running for charity and getting healthy is a winning combination :-) I started C25K three weeks ago, having done no sport whatsoever for 28 years, and I'm loving it... I was convinced that I would have given up by now. I'll be following your progress (in a non creepy way, of course. I only creep when I run).

  • Good to have a plan you can do a jeff galloway half marathon as baz says by run walking

    There are plenty of plans out there. I do myasics ones and have found them spot on

    Good luck with the task in hand.

  • Wow go you! What ambition! I look forward to hearing how you are getting on xx

  • Great plan and motivation to keep you going. While you are doing the c25k I recommend as other have that you take the pressure off and just concentrate on finding your form. The program works without speed to let your muscles and joints adapt to running to give a good basis to move onto your next project. Not everyone can do 5km at the end, hopefully you will be one of the lucky ones but if your not don't worry you will still be able to reach your goal. The most important thing to remember throughout is it is supposed to be fun so enjoy it. Even the hard runs feel good after you've done them. Good luck.

  • Yup. The common theme from all the experienced runners who have taken the time to respond to my questions/queries is exactly that. Don't worry at all about pace throughout c25k.

    I get it and will heed it. Thanks.

  • Now that is a motivating target! Good luck with your preparations.

  • I nearly hit sent on the Peterborough Half last night, but bottled it :(

    Might have another think now.

    Well done mate, you are an inspiration. :)

  • well done.. as a fellow Scot I appreciate how ' spending hard cash on it' can work as a motivator .. you wonder about (post c25k) 'Parkrun ' is a good stepping point out of the programme ( but there are as others have pointed out well established 'training programmes to take you up to 10 k and beyond... )

    Good luck in any event..

  • In for a penny, in for a pound ... a few pounds, eh! You're in good company and won't want for encouragement. That and your ambition, the sky's the limit. Keep us updated.

  • at least you have plenty of time try and get some 5k and a couple of 10k races for your training before the big day,this good to brake up your training and to keep you focused ,warning you bored sometime doing your long runs try different routes and playlist and make sure you choose a good training program asic/garmin theres lots to choose from .i finished this at the end of oct 13 done firsr half march 14 now on number 4 and training for manchester could be a sign of things to come for you one last thing dont panic enjoy the journey and go with the flow nothing is impossible

  • Good work, chap. A Half in October and a 4 1/2 hr marathon by next year are perfectly managable targets as long as you apply yourself consistently. There are many different training plans and regimes to achieve those distances in that timeframe, some suit some people, others suit others. The best one is the one you stick to.

    Whiost there is a lot of hard work to be done, don't fall into thetrap of viewing it with dread like an ordeal to be endured until you reach your goal: Whilst there will inevitable be bad days along the way, the main thing about running is that it is enjoyable, and you get out of it much more than you put in.

  • Thanks for that (and to Moger and misswobble).

    I will look into the pros and cons of the various training plans in due course. I think my level of enthusiasm will remain high (don't know for sure, of course) and what I have been through over the last 18 months leaves me pretty well prepared to deal with "bad days".

    Thanks again.

  • Enjoy! You will get there

  • brilliant....its so good to have a goal :)

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