How difficult is the transition from Week 6 to Week 7?

I have just completed Week 6, and as a non-running 56 year old was amazed to find that I could actually do it. I am sure that it's the slow steady build-up of interval training that has worked for me, and am not sure how well I'm going to manage now that it's just going to be longer runs - eek. Did others find this transition difficult? I guess the answer is that I just need to have confidence in the plan! By the way these forums have definitely helped to keep me motivated and it's great to see all the supportive posts here.

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  • I am starting week 7 on Friday, not 56 til next month though ! The programme does work so think we just keep going !

  • I did W7R2 today. I failed the first W7R1 for a variety of reasons - I decided to change my route, went at a different time etc, and my heart just wasn't in it, but on the 2nd attempt I was more resilient and accomplished the run. (I love the feeling at the end when you've finished and you're sweaty and red, but dead proud of yourself!)

    In reality there is no difference from W6R3 and W7R1, they're both 25 mins, but I think its the psychological battle of knowing that they're all long runs from here on in. Once you win that one, you're away! Today I ran and really enjoyed the first 20 minutes, who'dve thought I could even run for 5 minutes a few weeks back, let alone admit to enjoying it! It is about having faith in the programme and don't be afraid to look back at what you've achieved so far. You've come a long way!

  • When I first attempted week 7 run 1, I ran in the afternoon(which I rarely do) when it was hot, I also changed my route. I found it difficult, and after about 15 minutes I was just about done. On my second attempt, I was well rested and ran in the cool evening, and it was one of my best runs ever. I agree with Cookiedoodle, it is psychological and if you are prepared, you will do just fine. You have already ran for 22 minutes non stop. Three extra minutes is nothing. You can do it, I know you can.

  • totally agree it is a psychological battle as much as physical. I am 55 and non sporty, but have now graduated. I just went with the podcasts, and was amazed that on some runs, halfway through I got 'into a zone' with the music and the running and felt really good!! It is still a struggle, but not an impossible one...in the words of Laura..'you can do it '

    xx

  • Week 6 run 3 and week 7 run 1 are exactly the same are they not? if I recall correctly anyway. The only mental barrier is the fact that intervals have now gone. But by this stage, you are fit enough. The trick is to convince your brain that you are!!

    Do yourself as many favours as you can; run at your favourite time of day, drink plenty of water before, don't run soon after a mealtime and take it as slowly as you are comfortable. But don't rue the loss of the intervals. Look on it as a mini graduation, one step closer to the finish line of the programme!!

  • I struggled with the first W7 run, even though I'd done the same distance at week 6. Like rayagirl I ran on a hot afternoon after a stressful morning, and had to stop running before the end. I was so disappointed with myself, but I went out in the cool of the morning two days later determined to finish the run - and I did it!

    It's as much mental as physical for me - I'd appreciate ideas about how to think positive towards the end of the run when I'm tempted to give up. I'm starting w9 on Sunday morning. Just have to persuade my mind that I can do it.

    I'm 66 years old and have run on and off (mostly off) for the last ten years. C25K has been great for my motivation.

  • Hmm ideas for motivation towards the end of your run....

    Try and plan your route so there are no uphills in the last quarter.

    Just keep thinking about how good you will feel when you complete it. If you are tempted to stop, try and run just one more minute. If you are going to stop short, at least stop as close to the time as you can physically make it. Then when you get to the next minute, challenge yourself to another one. If you reeeeally have to stop then stop, but you may find that by breaking up the final minutes into individual minutes then it will seem less of a challenge to finish.

    I have never tried this but some people swear by it. instead of concentrating on your run and how difficult it is, try counting backwards from 100 in your head. it will give you something else to take your mind off the crushing pain in your lungs and you may find the last agonising few minutes slip by un-noticed!!

  • Thanks, Narmour. I like the idea of counting back from 100. I sometimes focus on just getting to the next lamppost, or car, or junction. Maybe imagining a big slice of cake waiting for me as long as I finish the run would help!

  • I like Narmour's ideas. I have also tried running to a podcast but found that I was looking at my watch every 2mins- really not good. I have tried thinking about my route & guessing how long it would take me to get to this or that landmark & found that surprisingly good.

  • I no longer wear my watch when I jog to prevent the distraction and demotivation it caused. I change my route depending on time of day and the weather. Devising a new route when out jogging helps to keep the motivation to run continuously. I have just completed week 9 & I'm amazed I completed the course. Turned 51 this year and was at my heaviest. Trying to eat healthily and not binge! Have lost 11lbs without following a strict diet. I sometimes log my food on myfitnesspal which has helped me understand calories and poor food choices. I use Cardio trainer app to record my route. This is a great motivator as it records how far you have run, how long it took and how many calories burnt. I like the calories burnt as it helps me to avoid poor food choices as I know how long I will have to jog to burn the calories.

  • Just found your reply in my spam box. I'm a little & only a little older :) but not quite as technically sophisticated yet but I'm getting there. Not enough willpower to diet on my own either. However, I've decided that it's not all downhill from here but onwards & upwards (in a good way).

  • It was about this stage I ditched Laura and the awful (to my ears!) c25k music and treated myself to my own playlist which I plotted for 25 minutes, I knew roughly how far along I was by the music track and I got an extra boost from hearing my favourite music.

    Actually it turned out I miscalculated (never very good on maths) and so had actually ran over 25 minutes, which I think does pretty much backup the psychological theory. Anyway, enjoy the sense of achievement, you'll have earned it. :-)

  • Thanks everyone for your replies and suggestions - really appreciate them. Lizziebeth, I hope your W7 run goes well tomorrow and happy birthday for next month! Must admit I feel a lot better physically than when I started on this and that,s got to be good. I like the tip about playlists and also thinking of something else to get through the last bit. Thanks again

  • Thanks for your good wishes, just in from the run and yes i did find it a bit of a struggle, but I did it!! Hope yours so be well too.

  • I've just done W6R2 this morning and struggled - but I did finish it!! However, I'm usually too far from home for the 5 minute warm-down to get me there. So I usually add another 5 minute run to music of my choice. It is a flat run home but so much easier to the right music!! (even after struggling with the podcast) I think this proves the psychological element. Maybe once I'm running continuously, I'll sort my own playlist. Aren't our minds fickle?!!

  • well done Lizziebeth and Ellie, and onwards!

  • I have been panicking that some people have been running for 25 kilometres whenever I see C25K as I know there is a 25K Run, phew!!!

    I know Im a bit slow on the abbreviations terminology but had anyone think of the same..

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