CLL Support Association
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What are antioxidants? And are they truly good for us?

What are antioxidants? And are they truly good for us?

"A healthy diet is the most effective way to get the antioxidants your body needs. Fruits, vegetables, grains, eggs and nuts are all useful sources of antioxidants. Despite the marketing hype, antioxidants found in so-called superfoods are no more effective than those in regular fruit and veg, so you’re better off saving your money.

But it’s a different story when it comes to antioxidant supplements. Research has found antioxidant supplements may cause more harm than good. A 2012 meta analysis of over 70 trials found antioxidant supplements are ineffective or even detrimental to health. The reasons are unclear, but the added nutritional benefits from consuming antioxidants in a healthy diet is likely to contribute to this. Also, the high concentrations of antioxidants associated with supplement use can lead to problems."

Jacqui Adcock, Research Fellow in Analytical Chemistry, Deakin University, explains how antioxidants work and why too much of a good thing may be harmful:

theconversation.com/what-ar...

Personally, I've heard conflicting opinions regarding whether taking antioxidants, like green tea/EGCG during chemotherapy is wise. One school of thought is that antioxidants help the cancer cells repair the DNA damage caused by treatment - and hence protecting the cancer!

Neil

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All things in moderation.

Len

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I've read that I shouldn't take green tea supplements with CLL, so I don't. I was thinking of taking them for weight loss and was glad I found out I shouldn't. I guess I'll have to lose weight the old fashioned way, eat less and exercise more. I do take 2 Vitamin C supplements a day and an occasional Vit. D supplement, and Zinc if I feel a cold coming on. I bought some Ginger root supplements for stomach upset, for both me and my husband, but I haven't checked yet to see if I can take it with Imbruvica, but I will check. Hope you're doing well Aussie Neil, and please continue to post whenever you can.

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I'm always concerned when supplements like Vitamin D3 are take arbitrarily. It is much preferred to have your doctor check your blood levels and adjusted for summer and winter sun exposures.

Per Mayo Clinic: mayoclinic.org/healthy-life...

The main consequence of vitamin D toxicity is a buildup of calcium in your blood (hypercalcemia), which can cause poor appetite, nausea and vomiting. Weakness, frequent urination and kidney problems also may occur.

There have been many past discussions on this site, please see: healthunlocked.com/search/v...

Len

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Good to know. I'll have my Vit D level checked. It's winter and very cold so I don't get outside very much. There are a lot of volunteers on HealthUnlocked now! Don't think I've seen your posts before but then I'm not on all that much. Thanks.

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I recently got a good book called How to Eat better by James Wong who tries to take all the different scientific research papers on food to see if they come up with the same results . Scientifically speaking being able to repeat something and getting the same result should mean it’s true. It’s a good read with lots of useful myth busters and also great tips like sticking mushrooms on the windowsill in the sun means you have a vitamin D packed meal in an hour.

He’s a scientist, or more specifically a botanist. Google him and you can make your own mind up😀

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