Apparent link between vitamin D insufficiency and early clinical failure in patients with follicular lymphoma (a close cousin to CLL)

Apparent link between vitamin D insufficiency and early clinical failure in patients with follicular lymphoma (a close cousin to CLL)

There appears to be a link between vitamin D insufficiency (VDI) and early clinical failure in patients with follicular lymphoma, according to an observational prospective cohort study involving 642 individuals. : mdedge.com/hematologynews/c...

Yet another reason to have your vitamin D level checked to ensure it is in the normal range. It may or may not help slow our CLL progression (for which we await the results of the Mayo Clinical trial). However given the regular reports of members who found that they were low and felt less fatigued when they boosted their vitamin D, it's definitely worth checking!

Previous posts on Vitamin D: healthunlocked.com/search/v...

Neil

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  • I think the magic number in the units of measure is 25 units in your blood of vitamin D. This is even more important for those with prostate cancer.

    Dennis, 70, 17p-, Ibrutinib

  • From: ods.od.nih.gov/factsheets/V... 'Serum concentrations of 25(OH)D are reported in both nanomoles per liter (nmol/L) and nanograms per milliliter (ng/mL). 1 nmol/L = 0.4 ng/mL'

    And from Table 1: '≥ 50 nmol/L or ≥ 20 ng/mL Generally considered adequate for bone and overall health

    in healthy individuals', so you would mean 25 ng/ml serum level, though In the section Vitamin D and health, there's the statement 'Optimal serum concentrations of 25(OH)D for bone and general health have not been established' and they may well end up being different for those with CLL.

    Note: '>125 nmol/L >50 ng/mL Emerging evidence links potential adverse effects to such high levels, particularly >150 nmol/L (>60 ng/mL)'

    This emerging evidence (and the fact that the supplement dose needed varies with the individual), is why we need to work with our medical team when ensuring our serum levels are healthy. If we need to take capsules, D3 appears to be preferable given it is available without a prescription in the USA.

    I presume your comment with regard to those with prostate cancer is to reduce the degree of osteoporosis from hormone therapy? There's a section on the role of Vitamin D with Cancer in the above article, but it doesn't go into detail, so perhaps you are able to provide a reference?

    Neil

  • Do you think the Low Vitamin D helps cause the cancer or the other way around? I am checking mine at my next blood work.

  • I don't think anyone knows what the connection is - do cancer cells use up vitamin D or does low vitamin D somehow encourage the development of cancer? Vitamin D is nowadays better classified hormone and there are receptors for it in most body cells.

  • Thanks!

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