Clinical trial shows sunscreen is effective in preventing UV from causing genetic damage and protects against the three forms of skin cancer

Clinical trial shows sunscreen is effective in preventing UV from causing genetic damage and protects against the three forms of skin cancer

Down under, we are heading into another summer and so will need to be vigilant about sun safety, given the increased risk of skin cancers that goes with CLL. For those that wonder whether smearing a chemical concoction over the largest organ in your body is wise, the Queensland University of Technology has undertaken a world-first human study to assess the impact of sunscreen at the molecular level. (Queensland is renown for having the highest rates of skin cancer in the world.) In a clinical trial of 57 volunteers that provided skin biopsies, researchers found (SPF30+) sunscreen provides 100 per cent protection against all three forms of skin cancer: BCC (basal cell carcinoma); SCC (squamous cell carcinoma); and malignant melanoma. Further, they found that sunscreen applied to the skin before UV exposure, completely blocked the effects of DNA damage, p53 induction, and cellular proliferation in both melanocytes and keratinocytes.

University News Release:

news.qut.edu.au/cgi-bin/Web...

Abstract:

onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi...

Neil

PS I didn't see anyone out getting a tan when I took this beach photograph. The wind whipped up the foam nicely, with one blob of airborne foam just missing the camera lens.

5 Replies

oldestnewest
  • Ah! blue sky. That new camera is getting a good workout. What is it ?

    Here in the uk we will have to worry about S.A.D. not the lovely sun you will be enjoying. Can we look forward to being cheered up with sunlit photos?

    Bub

  • Actually that photo was taken last week with the old camera. I'll keep your suggestion in mind about out of season photographs. That's one factor in my family's enjoyment of calendars from our northern hemisphere friends. The snowy scenes make us feel cooler in the heat of our summer!

  • You can still choose non-toxic sunscreen, that's what I do. Lots of places online give safety ratings and listings of safe sunscreen (e.g., EWG's Skin Deep database).

  • Neil, should you be doing this.??

    You say that ‘The wind whipped up the foam nicely, with one blob of airborne foam just missing the camera lens.’

    Clearly the foam was in the air and would be in the air you breathe. But as an immune system compromised CLL’er, just as we all are, these flying pollutants are not harmless. After all something makes the sea foam..

    Or is this a risk that as a CLL’er you are willing to accept.? A bit like riding a motorbike.?

    See Wikipedia :-

    ‘a type of foam created by the agitation of seawater, particularly when it contains higher concentrations of dissolved organic matter (including proteins, lignins, and lipids)[1] derived from sources such as the offshore breakdown of algal blooms. These compounds can act as surfactants or foaming agents.’

    ‘Where polluted stormwater from rivers or drains discharges to the coast, sea foam formed on adjacent beaches can be polluted with viruses and other contaminants.’

    en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sea_foam

    Dick

  • I am suitably chastened. At the time I was more worried about the foam getting onto the camera, but given there's a river outlet about 2km away and we are advised not to swim for a few days after heavy rain, your advice is sound. So much for sea water being healthy...

You may also like...