The results are in from last week. Tumor twice as large, too large to consider for transplant, the cancer would just spread to the new organ. They want to do an Ablation in hopes of reducing its size. I wonder how often that works out. Ablation is very risky, it could change my good quality of life I still experience. But its all I have other than taking my chances and really all of this is a shot in the dark. I am deep in thought. I did cycle 9 miles this morning.

43 Replies

  • Oh Catfish I do feel for you...dreadful news and what a nightmare decision to have to make....current quality of life versus unknown outcome with ablation. I suppose the million dollar question is, without treatment, how soon before your current quality of life deteriorates? I'm sure you'll consider every angle and make the best decision for you.

    Praying for you 🙏🏻

  • Thank you

  • I had ablation when my tumour was about 3cm and it reduced significantly. On the second occasion, the radiographer could not find it and imaging identified the fact that it had shrunk. On both occasions, I had no ill effects.

  • Thank you, that's a lot to hang onto. I will remember your positive experience.

  • keep strong exercise yes cycle ,,,,you will make the right decision Matt

  • A dilemma; but Mikes post is encouraging xx

  • Such a tough decision to make...just do what's right for you I'm sure you'll make the right choice!! I love the picture by the way gorgeous! It must be amazing to be able to see that whenever you please.

    Good luck.


  • I know of several people who have had ablation. Which had no ill effects, shrunk the Tumor , or tumours effectively and they went on to have transplants, so good luck , and I hope it works for you. x X

  • Really encouraging words and experiences

  • Sorry to hear that you must be in a awkward dilemma or catch 22. I had two tumors (HCC) prior to liver transplant, which were just under 3 cm. They treated me with TACE ( trans-arterial chemoembolization) on two seperate occasions. The treatment was a success which shrunk the tumors to stop from spreading. Although I don't really know much about Ablation I have read on a couple of sites about it. The success rate seems to be very good for small tumors. It is obvious you have read up about it, so all I can do to help is to post this link and hope the information can help..........Good luck ......Dave radiologyinfo.org/en/info.c...

  • Thank you.

  • Hi I read last week that you were told there was no hope and you thought 28 days ..we were all dismayed,.. Then later that day I you wrote there was s possible chance of transplant so there was hope again...carry on with this thought ...it's a hard decision but you will choose the right one. Good luck

  • I am just scared to death but I have not given up all hope. Thank you so much for reminding me how fast things change from good to hard then back again to good to hard. The ride makes me dizzy.

  • Hi again ..I just read up on the ablation procedure and expectations and I found it reassuring ..yes it's not me having to consider but it could help you and give you time. That's just me thinking and somewhere on this conversation there is a man who has had it done successfully....it's a chance and a gamble but we are all on these sites seeking answers ...whatever you decide will be the right choice for you

  • Thinking of you and sending you best wishes ✨✨✨✨

  • Hi Catfish,

    The decision you have to make is a tough one and personal to you;every persons story is different and unique.

    A bit about my story which may help inform you - I had a cirrhotic liver and HCC which was treated by one TAE (without the chemo as my platelets were too low) and two procedures of TACE. Then I was suspended from the transplant list because they detected another tumour, the only thing that got me back on the list was ablation which obliterated the small tumour and did damage to the second one. After all of these procedures I was sore for a week or so but no long term side effects. My main tumour was in a difficult place to reach in my liver and I always explained to my consultant before each procedure, that my quality of life was good and that I was not in pain, and asked him not to do any thing to jeopardise that. I was lucky that my consultant was empathic and feel that he respected and understood what I was saying.

    You may decide treatment is not for you which is something I can understand and totally respect.

    Whatever you decide you will be in my thoughts over the coming weeks with love and light.

  • Thank you. This is very helpful. I am now even more deeply struck by the quality of people in this group. I feel more hopeful.

  • Awe ty for you update, you must be so anxious about all this especially the disscion you have to make. So much to think about..sending hugs,,9 miles cycle? thats good going.:). well done.

  • I had RFA last year. It got rid of one of the lesions but they couldn't get the other one. I had it done under the CT because the lesions don't show on the Ultrasound.

    It was done under general anesthesia and took about 4 hours.

    The recovery was ok.

    The lesion that was ablated hasn't returned.

  • Excellent, thank you 🙏🙏🙏

  • What an inspiration my prayers and with you.........Maria

  • Thank you, all of you are causing me to have faith and courage...

  • I don't really have any knowledge of this so I can't comment on the procedure, but there are some really positive comments. I can imagine your dilemma, but for how long will you enjoy your current quality of life without this treatment?

    Dr's have a duty to warn you of all the bad outcomes. Unless they said the risk outweighed the benefit I would have to say I think I'd go for it.

    Ask for an honest opinion of your prognosis both with and without the treatment, this might help you make up your mind.

    You're staying really strong, I can't believe you can get out there cycling with that on your mind. But it seems to be working. Keep it up.

  • You are a tremendous help in shifting my fear to hope. Thank you for that.

  • Hey, you're the Buddhist, you know all about shifting emotions. I must admit I'm not a religious person but I took the Buddhist philosophy when I was ill and controlled my fear.

    It's so simple:

  • Thanks I love this monk. Buddhism is a philosophy not a religion. There are no gods. Basically it teaches responsibility. That's fascinating how much it influenced you when you needed it. Basically it's non attachment. That's why I do not take life with a grain of salt. It's not fair. It just goes as it will but with out negative thinking we can rise above our fear. We can face what is set upon us. But darn I get scared. I need influence to settle me down and I always seek it. There is a lot of that here. The stories everyone has cause me to rise above my fear.

  • I will chant nam-myoho-renge-kyo for you.

  • Sweet. Thank you.

  • Catfish i know i have replied once but i have to say the first time i saw your profile picture with you standing by your bike i thought what an amazing woman..the picture you have now put up made my heart skip a beat,,it read to me that you have gone,,kinda like the place where you once stood by your bike is now empty and the bike on the ground.Hope your not offended by my comment, i still see you as an amazing woman /.:)

  • Thats a fascinating comment. I was a photography teacher. Clearly you read photographs. Thats rather unusual, usually only poets, writers and photographers respond to images in that way. I will take to heart your observation. I am not a quitter but I sure can feel defeated some days. I have two children around the age of 40 to live for. I do not want to leave them alone. They have their fathers family but he only died a year ago. He had lung cancer. Thanks for sharing your feelings. That means a lot to me.

  • awe ty catfish, i do write poetry and i love photographery,send hugs to your children and you.;x

  • why do you not investigate the benefits of CBD / medical marujana its well known for curing cancer

    go to facebook grouos on CBD

  • I know all about it. There are people on the islands using it for cancer. Using it disqualifies us for transplant. I need a transplant to live. Its not about just the cancer. But yes I bleive in using cannabis for many health issues. I am not fed up. I never will be. I just want to live. Life is not fair. I am 64. There are so many born that never have a day, a childhood, the wild and crazy teenage years, nor life as an adult. I am lucky, I was blessed with all those years. I just want to know who I am as a very old person, I want my children to experience me as an old woman. Thank you for your thoughts.

  • are you saying that using CBD which is the legal part and non hallinogenic disqualifies you from transplant ?

    mind you personally i think i would put more trust in CBD than in anti rejection post transplant drugs

  • Yep. It's your right to think as you choose. Are you I'll? Have you been cured of anything using it?

  • Hi Catfish, I'm sorry you are having to deal with all this. I'm hoping that I can help by sharing my experience - I was a surgical tech for 7 years and assisted with several ablation and tumor removal surgeries.

    Ablation usually works very well and is not considered a risky procedure unless the cancer has spread to multiple organs or the patient is very weak. The main risk of ablation is that, if they do not kill every single cancer cell, then those surviving cells might allow the cancer to regrow. This shows up on imaging, and then they can do the ablation again to get it under control.

    My grandfather had a tumor on his kidney, had the ablation procedure to zap it, and was home that same day. He had practically no recovery or soreness. 18 months later, the spot returned, so they repeated the procedure. He's been cancer free since then.

    Once they zap the tumor, you can be put back on the transplant list, right?

  • Thats a very excellent story to focus my sights on. I surely appreciate these positive experiences as they are helping me to shift my fear of Ablation. I can feel it happening inside of me. Thank you with my full heart. Aloha

  • This is why we are in this community. We can share our experiences both good and bad so we can support those in their time of need. Mike's posting is surely an indication that there is definitely hope for the future. So you keep cycling and I will continue to play table tennis.


  • Ask if photodynamic therapy is and option before you gave surgery. Its currently not used for all tumours, but has been fantastically effective in killing tumours.

    Sadly our pdt isnt yet approved for use - its the next generation and with a probe with uv light source will be used in the body or with what we're calling a haemalyser will treat blood born cancers.

    Good luck x

  • Words seem so futile and shallow, trying to stand in your shoes, feeling out of depth. I read this somewhere recently,'all of our days are numbered, all we ever have is the present moment. There is nothing to fear, be comfortable and do what makes you happy'. Sending you strength from New Zealand :)

  • Hi catfish,

    Like lyn66, i too saw your bike on it s side and thought you felt deflated and down.PLEASE stay positive, as i have said You WILL get through this.You have tremendous support from all of these beautiful people(including myself) and the choice of ablation is your choice entirely.Although after all the positive comments about this proceedure..i know what i would do.At the end of the day,it s your life and you will do what s best for you.Thinking of you and if you have the energy get that bike off the ground and get in the saddle(no offence) just willing you on! TC Jenny xx

  • Very thoughtful of you. I had to rest 2 days after cycling 34 miles but I promise to ride soon. I agree with you about the Ablation experiences. I see the transplant doctor in two weeks or so then we will see what hoops I must jump thru to keep on keeping on. I did have a long walk in the woods along the beach today. Thanks again for your encouraging words.

  • Keep on, keeping on.jenny x