Yoga for osteoporosis : Anybody know of any... - Bone Health

Bone Health
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Yoga for osteoporosis

Jshapz
Jshapz

Anybody know of any special yoga for osteoporosis classes in Essex x/London

57 Replies
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You should be able to find the names and contact details for various yoga clubs or organisations in your area. Your local public library is a great resource for finding out info like this.

Jshapz
Jshapz
in reply to HeronNS

The problem is that there are lots of yoga classes including the ones at my gym but none actually specifically deal with osteoporosis- they just say do what you feel comfortable with which is not good

HeronNS
HeronNS
in reply to Jshapz

You may be lucky and find someone who lives near you. I did find this old thread:

healthunlocked.com/boneheal...

Jshapz
Jshapz
in reply to HeronNS

I looked at this earlier and the link on it doesn’t work so not sure anything came out of it

HeronNS
HeronNS
in reply to Jshapz

I looked up verite greenbee and found this site:

aftercancers.com/category/o...

So I think you could contact her.

I was surprised to see an email address in the HealthUnlocked thread as these are as a general rule removed.

Jshapz
Jshapz
in reply to HeronNS

Thanks. Will drop her a message x

HeronNS
HeronNS
in reply to Jshapz

She also still seems to be active on HealthUnlocked. veriterc

HeronNS
HeronNS
in reply to Jshapz
Jshapz
Jshapz
in reply to HeronNS

Is this somewhere in Canada

HeronNS
HeronNS
in reply to Jshapz

You know, I think it is. when I saw "Old South London" I thought it was the UK. Sorry!

Jshapz
Jshapz
in reply to HeronNS

Lol. I was looking at directions and it cane up as can’t find a way by train! Only flying Definitely a gap in this field in England

HeronNS
HeronNS
in reply to Jshapz

Also they claimed to be International. Oh well. Too far away for me too!

Jshapz
Jshapz
in reply to HeronNS

The courses sounded brilliant and then I saw the dollar signs

HeronNS
HeronNS
in reply to Jshapz

Now here's an idea - contact the Royal Osteoporosis Society.

theros.org.uk/

Jshapz
Jshapz
in reply to HeronNS

I’ll try them again tomorrow to see if things have changed! Thank you for all your help

HeronNS
HeronNS
in reply to Jshapz

Given the population base of your area I think there must be something! Good Luck!

Jshapz
Jshapz
in reply to HeronNS

You’d think so but I’ve been googling for days lol

Do you mean for someone with osteoporosis?

Yoga is not a preventive because by its nature its low impact.

To strengthen bones you need weight bearing impact exercise, like walking and running or jumping.

Jshapz
Jshapz
in reply to fibrofoggy

Yoga does help create bone mass and strengthens together with balance. I’ve just ordered a bellicon trampoline and recently purchased a marodyne liv vibration plate. I already do loads of walking as am a dog walker Also just commenced taking algaecal and strontium. So hopefully I’m now armoured to beat osteoporosis!

annelii
annelii
in reply to fibrofoggy

Look up Loren Fishman in New York who has done research into this.

Jshapz
Jshapz
in reply to annelii

I have his books already and am in touch with his representative but would just prefer to do classes as well

I have recently learned that many forms of yoga can exasperate loose ligaments and joints; putting too much pressure on bones. Try Pilates with a reformer. It has strengthened me in all ways.

Jshapz
Jshapz
in reply to Seacrab

I know that’s why I’m looking for specialist yoga class. I’ve been reading Loren Fishman book on yoga for osteoporosis and definitely lots we shouldn’t be doing but loads in book we can and does help create bone mass and strength and balance. I’ll follow the book but it’s so annoying I pay a large gym membership and none of the yoga instructors seem to be be able to give alternative moves.

annelii
annelii
in reply to Jshapz

Hello, I have found the same problem with UK yoga teachers, that they are generally unaware of the restrictions around osteoporosis and yoga. I haven’t found what I consider to be a good one in this respect. I have been following Loren Fishman’s method on my own for a few years and have been in contact with him. He is running some free webinars at the moment with YogaU at the moment, and was going to investigate whether any of his classes could be live-streamed (although they tend to be in the middle of the night uk time). Unfortunately there are no Fishman certified teachers in the uk and I have more than once suggested to yoga centres that someone goes over to do his training. Apart from apparently strengthening bones, yoga is good for core strength to support the back. It also seems to have helped with incipient arthritis in my hip and possibly knee - he has done a book on yoga and arthritis too. I did some research on therapeutic yoga teachers and found a couple in London who deal with physical issues - I will have a look for their names when I get to my computer - I never had time to follow them up. Hopefully someone else will come up with a teacher too!

Jshapz
Jshapz
in reply to annelii

Thank goodness I’m not the first Bly one in England having this problem. Been on royal osteoporosis society website and no support in my area !! Just waiting to call them. They’ll probably just suggest again that I take the meds!

Londinium
Londinium
in reply to annelii

I'd appreciate names/details of the London based ones. Thanks. 🖖🏻

annelii
annelii
in reply to Seacrab

Yoga if incorrectly practised can indeed cause injury to joints and ligaments, which is why it is important to find a well trained teacher. Iyengar is supposed to be the most precise and careful form, but the issue is finding one who understands osteoporosis. I have a book on how to protect knees and hips in yoga, as well as the Loren Fishman Yoga for Osteoporosis and Margaret Martin’s Yoga for Better Bones. Both are good on safety. However if you prefer Pilates anyway I am sure it is just as good, and of course also has some safety restrictions for osteoporosis.

Jshapz
Jshapz
in reply to annelii

That’s the problem none of them understand or had any specific training on OP. So annoying when they just fob you off and say just do what’s comfortable! I’ll have to go to New York to get training from Loren

I’ve been thinking of doing the same, maybe one of his out of town residentials.

Jshapz
Jshapz
in reply to annelii

Where do you live

annelii
annelii
in reply to Jshapz

North London

I contacted ROS and asked if they had any info on instructors who did op pilates and yoga and they could not give me any leads or help. I have looked for instructors and apparently they have to have a "bone health certificate" to give instruction to anyone with op, unless of course you don't tell me that you have op. I rang a few pilates instructors, because I couldn't find any yoga instructors with, and some of the, although they had this certificate didn't know what exercises I could or couldn't do. The only instructors I could find were physiotherapists who were confident enough to give instruction to anyone with op. I should have added that unless it is a physio, most instructors will need a permission letter from your gp, I would love to find a class that is geared up for those of us with op, but have found I just have to do my own exercises that I have found on-line and from Margaret Martin's books.

Jshapz
Jshapz
in reply to karmel

This doesn’t surprise me one bit. I contacted ROS a couple of years ago and nothing. So annoying. I really want to do a teaching course myself perky for OP but it’s where to go to get it!

karmel
karmel
in reply to Jshapz

IMO I think you would have to go to the States, Canada, Australia for any such course. In all the op exercise videos I have seen on YouTube - I have not seen a UK one.

Jshapz
Jshapz
in reply to karmel

Loads in India obviously. Might make a holiday of it. I go to Australia every year to see my son and family so that could be an opportunity

Right so upon asking the Royal Osteoporosis Society as to whether they know of any osteoporosis trained yoga teachers in England the answer was “no - but does there need to be specifically trained yoga teachers for osteoporosis “. My answer to that was surely you know there should be because of all the dangers moves...... she told me to look at their fact sheets which will tell me what we shouldn’t be doing. I said I already know all that from Loren Fishman books but just wanted details of any specialist classes. Then of course I was just told no. Helpful

Londinium
Londinium
in reply to Jshapz

I rang them years ago - they just pushed bisphosphonates and keeping low levels of Vit D3. The same with the British Heart Foundation and Heart UK - they just push the drugs.

Jshapz
Jshapz
in reply to Londinium

Exactly and so far I’ve found none!

karmel
karmel
in reply to Londinium

We are led to believe that ROS offers impartial advice.

Londinium
Londinium
in reply to karmel

Cant annoy the funders. 🤔

annelii
annelii
in reply to karmel

The RoS is funded in part by pharmaceutical companies among other organisations - see their financial accounts from 2017: theros.org.uk/media/99989/n...

annelii
annelii
in reply to annelii

Let me know if this link doesn't work properly - it should send you to a redirect page.

karmel
karmel
in reply to annelii

Link works fine annelii. Thanks very much - very interesting.

Bilahora
Bilahora
in reply to karmel

There is no such thing. Everyone has a position to protect or a product to sell. Talking of products there is a goldmine waiting to be exploited by people who are trained to run exercise classes for people with OP. But again it won't be cheap.

karmel
karmel
in reply to Bilahora

I don't understand why physiotherapists are not doing classes geared for those of us with op, why there are no personal trainers or pilates instructors who have "Bone Health Certificates" but don't know what exercises you should or should do if you have op. I think physical therapists in some other countries are more forward thinking, enterprising and better educated about what kind of physical exercise those of us with op need.

Bilahora
Bilahora
in reply to karmel

Agreed and I really do think that where there is a gap in the market it will be filled. Not that that is much help at the moment and there will certainly be rip-off merchants when things get going. Maybe the best approach is to continue to search and agitate (or train to be such an instructor).

karmel
karmel
in reply to Bilahora

I am too old now Bilahora, as it would mean studying in the States or Canada to be an instructor. There is no body or association in the UK as far as I know - and it hasn't been for want of trying to find one.

annelii
annelii
in reply to karmel

Absolutely - maybe we should contact the Chartered Society of Physiotherapists to suggest it.

karmel
karmel
in reply to annelii

Can only speak from my own experience from trying to find a class, personal trainer/ fitness instructor who was able to instruct anyone with op. I think you could join any mainstream fitness class but you would personally have to know what you should or shouldn't do if the instructor cannot modify the exercises for you. I would think any instructor would have to have a degree in fitness science or physiotherapy for insurance purposes - as the "Bone Health Certificates" that some pilates instructors have doesn't seem to cover, from what I have been told by pilates instructors, unless they are physiotherapists, what you should or should not do if you have op, depending on how severe your op is.

karmel
karmel
in reply to Jshapz

When I was first diagnosed with op I didn't know what exercises I shouldn't do. After trying and failing to find a 1-2-1 pt\or a class with an instructor who had a "bone health certificate" for op I had to see physiotherapists The last newsletter I rec'd from ROS was still showing in their exercises side bends and the cat/cow position which means you are rounding your back - a big no no for anyone with op.

IMO if you have op you need a class that offers a warm-up, aerobics\cardio vascular, weights, resistance bands, balancing and stretching. Unfortunately no type of class like this exists where I live in the UK and so I have had to make up my own exercise programme.

I have heard yoga does not do alot for bones but if I hear of a class I will post it . for strong bones do some weight bearing workouts

Tai chi is good for bones, as is Nordic walking.

Sorry about the delay in getting back to you on this. The type of yoga you are looking for is remedial yoga and below are some centres in London that offer it. As said, I didn't have time to check them out, but intend to try at some point.

tiys.co.uk/classes/

iymv.org/specialist-classes...

breathe-london.com/wellbein...

artofyoga.co.uk/remedial/

karmel
karmel
in reply to annelii

Thanks for the links, I don't know whether it is me not looking properly but I couldn't find any of the instructors having an understanding\knowledge of op. Some of them mentioned, back problems but none mentioned the "dreaded" op.

annelii
annelii
in reply to annelii

Hi Karmel

Sorry re delay in replying. These are just specialists in remedial yoga who use it as a form of physiotherapy. None of them specify OP but my assumption would be that they will be more likely to understand the physical limitations of conditions given the lists that some of them include and would be able to adapt. I think one of them does one to ones. BTW re the comment below re positions, Fishman says that he has never seen an injury caused by twists (reiterated in his recent videos on Yoga U) and has gentle forms of them in his book. I have been doing them since I was diagnosed. I think it depends on the form your OP takes. But read his book before trying them. Margaret Martin In Yoga for Better Bones also gives advice on them. Her ‘how not to’ pix in general are helpful, although the advice on twists is just verbal. The position I never use is forward bends. But caution caution caution! And good luck!

This depends on what you want out of your yoga class. If you are planning on practising yoga for pain relief, some teachers offer a 12 week course to relieve lower back pain. This initiative is not nationwide yet but there is a teacher operating in the Leigh on Sea area in Essex. ( yogaforbacks.co.uk lists all the teachers.) I had 5 lumbar fractures in 2015 and it was some time (two years +) before I could even consider something like this. However, when I did, it changed my life - pain was greatly reduced and I regained mobility and flexibility beyond my expectations. It was also very therapeutic and helped calm me and made me feel less depressed. It's not a quick fix and you do need to practise daily for best results. It's not designed with just osteoporosis in mind, so you still have to be aware of your own limitations and take care with some postures and stretches.

My teacher for Yoga for Backs (a yoga therapist) tried to set up a follow on, gentle yoga class but attendance was poor and it only lasted just over a year. Last autumn I googled 'yoga therapists' in my local area and emailed all of them, explaining my situation and the limitations I still have that make going to a conventional yoga class difficult (I'm slow to get up and down, need a chair sometimes for support, I have problems with forward bends and twists ...) Some teachers ignored my email but I also had some really lovely replies. One lady was sure she could have helped me but had no vacancies at that time. She actually recommended another class to me and that is where I am going now. It is a class of mixed abilities and there are plenty of aids (additional mats, blocks, bolsters, blankets) to use for help or comfort.

My advice is to do your homework. Tell prospective teachers truthfully what you can and can't do and what you want to get out of your class. I want to continue to work on my mobility and flexibility and the other, less tangible benefits that yoga practice brings. I am still improving and am finally starting to feel comfortable in my body again.

I hope this is helpful.

You mentioned that you " have problems with forward bends and twists" I personally don't think you should be doing either of these if you have op. I wouldn't do any pose/asana that included forward bending or twisting the spine.

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