Can I skip my angiogram?: I have a... - British Heart Fou...

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Can I skip my angiogram?

Kaklong75
Kaklong75
137 Replies

I have a broken heart sydrom.I Don't want to make angiogram because I think it is hurt.I only take my medicine when my heart pain.Can i skip my angiogram?

137 Replies
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CPL593H

I’d say follow the medics advice. The angiogram is not too bad, it does not hurt, it just feels strange. When I had mine I simply (in my head) counted from one to a hundred, whenever I got to one hundred or got disturbed (the doctors sometimes ask questions) I simply started from one again. A simple, mental distraction technique.

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Kaklong75
Kaklong75
in reply to CPL593H

Oh my god

Mental distraction technique

Are you okay today after do angiogram?

Did your heart going good?

What is doctor said after you do it?

How many block you stem it?

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CPL593H
CPL593H
in reply to Kaklong75

The angiogram is fine. I had no blockages and therefore no stents. Was eventually diagnosed with Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy.

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Kaklong75
Kaklong75
in reply to CPL593H

Now you see.No need angio.My heart just big because I am a broken heart.I am really a broken heart woman.

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CPL593H
CPL593H
in reply to Kaklong75

My angio ruled out many potential conditions. It was not a waste. If a qualified doctor/ consultant recommended the angio, the sensible option is to have the angio. It’s a good diagnostic tool. I was thought at one point (incorrectly) to have broken heart syndrome.

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Kaklong75
Kaklong75
in reply to CPL593H

Oh i see

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LaceyLady
LaceyLady
in reply to Kaklong75

Not having the prescribed angiogram will cause problems with travel or health insurance. My consultant had said he wanted me to have one and my travel insurers refused to renew my cover and we had to cancel our trip to South America 😫

I’ve since had angiogram and all if fine, no problems.

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Kaklong75
Kaklong75
in reply to LaceyLady

Okay

Thank you

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Twins11
Twins11
in reply to CPL593H

I have this was diagnosed 2 years ago via echo and MRI

1 like
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Kaklong75
Kaklong75
in reply to Twins11

How are you now?

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Twins11
Twins11
in reply to Kaklong75

Just had yearly check up back to playing gentle doubles tennis and luckily echo and ecg not changed. Do get tired more easily and not as much energy but hey ho .. how about you it’s all a bit of a shock isn’t it ?

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Kaklong75
Kaklong75
in reply to Twins11

I get chest pain.

It is very painful

I am warded because of that

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Twins11
Twins11
in reply to CPL593H

This us what I have diagnosis was a bit of a shock

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Kaklong75
Kaklong75
in reply to Twins11

Did you do angiogram?

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Calliope153

Ask your doctor.

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Kaklong75

Doctor ask me to do it.

If I don't,I will died

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Calliope153

Seems you already have an answer from your doctor.

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Kaklong75

I am afraid to do that.

My Facebook friend make a story about her mother.

Her mother died after do angio.

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Calliope153

No point in going on about it here. You have the answer and so talk it over with your doctor or a friend. You also need to read about broken heart syndrome - it might help you be less afraid.

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Shockedwithstent

If a doctor has asked you to do an angiogram please do it. I had it 11 months ago and it was easy, they gave me anxiety medication and it went by very quickly. When I came out I had to keep my legs straight for 24 hours but then I was out the next day. They may do another one again but its better to be safe.

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Kaklong75

Wow you will do it again,how brave you are

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Shockedwithstent

I have no choice, if I dont I may end up in a worse position with other complications in future. My first angiogram showed I had 90% blocked in main artery so very lucky to be alive. You should listen to the doctors advice and follow their recommendation. Best of luck

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Kaklong75

I cry every single day and night.

Why me?

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Calliope153

The rest of us could think that but just think, why not you?

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Kaklong75

Lol

Because my god love me

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Calliope153

OK, we all think that too but then start thinking why are you so special that you are not going to get what happens to the rest of us?

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Calliope153

all this thinking will take your mind off things.

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Kaklong75

What do you means?

I don't understand

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Calliope153

Think about things other than your health. Instead of crying work hard to help other family members.. It will help you.

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Kaklong75

Oh sure.

Why not?

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Sunnie2day

I'm having an angiogram on the 20th (this coming Wednesday). I am not looking forward to it, did everything I could think of including begging my cardiologist to reschedule the cardiac MRI he cancelled saying he felt I should have the angiogram instead.

I don't want it and the biggest reason I don't is actually my fear it's going to hurt. I absolutely hate needles, even a simple blood draw is bad enough to me so the thought of the drip being inserted, the cannula and then wires feeding up and around and through, well it all has me in 'NO NO NO NO, I don't want this' mode!

But Wednesday morning will find me at the hospital checking in for the angiogram - I trust my cardiologist and he says I need this procedure. He knows I'm really afraid and has ordered 'anxiety' medication. That should help and you might want to ask your doctor for something to be given just before they get started.

Do you trust your cardiologist? If you do, then go to the angiogram. As my husband says, it's better to know than to wonder. And do ask for pain and anxiety medication to be given before the procedure begins.

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Kaklong75

Thank you.

Your afraid is same for me.

I got broken heart syndrome so i think angio doest help because my heart just big not blocked.

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Sunnie2day

It's my understanding angiography can tell the medics more than just about blockages.

Are you having your angiogram here in the UK?

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Kaklong75

No

I am from Malaysia.

Do you know where it is?

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Sunnie2day

Yes, I know where Malaysia is - sadly can't go there as the weather is too hot and humid for my heart, but it is a beautiful country according to my friends who've been.

So, you are having the angiogram in Malaysia - I've heard good things about the specialist care there so you are in good hands, I think.

About the angiogram for Takotsubo (also known as Broken Heart Syndrome), I read something recently angiography is used to discover the cause of the Syndrome.

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Kaklong75

I hope your opinion is true

Thank you

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Sunnie2day

:) Please update us and let us know how you're getting on!

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Kaklong75

I don't know when i get my angio because my doctor still waiting for the donation.It will cost about rm9,000 here

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Sunnie2day

That amount converts to nearly £1700GBP - here in the UK people who aren't eligible for NHS free care and are without private insurance, pay close to £3000 for an 'uncomplicated' angiogram, and £££ more if stents or an overnight hospitalisation is needed. Are you 'crowd-funding' the fees for your angiogram?

We here in the UK take our NHS for granted sometimes - we may have to wait months for the procedure (unless 'urgent') but it is free to UK citizens and those with permanent residency.

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Calliope153

Free at the point of delivery - you do have to pay National Insurance every week you earn. After 42 years of payment I am rather irritated by the youngsters I know telling me my treatment is "free". Even the brightest don;t appear to understand they will eventually contribute to the pot - and when I point out their vaccinations as babies (don;t forget their delivery too) cost they are genuinely taken aback. They have no idea how schools are funded for their education. I think my biggest shock ever when, as a young teacher, one of my classes was talking about what they were going to do when they grew up. this was in a very deprived area and one of the boys informed me he would do the same job as his father. As I knew his father didn;t work I asked what that was - signing on once a week for his dole money. 18 of that class believed that signing on was a job and had no understanding of how the system worked. They vaguely believed that the magic money tree existed for the government who redistributed it. I know this story is hard to believe but it is absolutely true.

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Sunnie2day

I apologise for that, I should have been more specific. It is beyond irritating when people forget that we pay in, and I should have made sure to include that information in my comment.

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Kaklong75

Nothing free in this world

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Kaklong75

Yes

For the government,it is free

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Calliope153

Suspect your decimal point in the wrong place - Malaysian Ringgit 9,000 is about £1,700!!!

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Calliope153

sorry lost half that reply for some reason; it should read - £1 700 plus other costs - suspect it would be a lot more overall - I did it as a calculation and the decimal point was in the wrong place = told me 9,000 equalled £17,000!!!

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Sunnie2day

:) I've done that (missed or added a decimal) - when close to retirement I found myself doing it more often, so glad when my last day rolled in and I knew I wouldn't be giving myself an 'office stroke' ever again (office stroke is what happens when the email is condensed and we forget to scroll left to see the whole message, or when haste or 'fat finger' gives that sudden sharp shocker of a cost or stat result - and oh my did I have my 'fair share' of office strokes!).

I wonder if Kaklong will reply and let us know if the cost is inclusive or if there will be additional costs.

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Calliope153

You might be interested in this quote from Wiki -

Malaysia generally has an efficient and widespread system of health care, operating a two-tier health care system consisting of both a government base universal healthcare system and a co-existing private healthcare system. Infant mortality rate – a standard in determining the overall efficiency of healthcare – in 2005 was 10, comparing favourably with the United States and western Europe. Life expectancy at birth in 2005 was 74 years.[1] While there is a universal healthcare system, specialist services requires queing despite being free. Hence the private health care plays a major role in providing specialist services which complements the universal health care.

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Sunnie2day

That is interesting, thank-you!

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Kaklong75

Yes

Me too

Thank you for the info

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Kaklong75

Wow.

Proud to be Malaysian

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Kaklong75

Don't worry about the coast

I am more worry about angio procedure.

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Kaklong75

It is rm9000=£17000

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Kaklong75

Really?

Which One?

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Kaklong75

Yes

Like me

I am in waiting list

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Alessa69
Alessa69
in reply to Kaklong75

If your Cardiologist is recommending that you have an Angiogram, it would be very unwise not to follow the advice they have given you. Just make sure that you discuss your anxiety with your Medical Team 1st, so that sedation can be given. I have had two, over space of a few years. They did not hurt, but helped diagnose issues.

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Kaklong75
Kaklong75
in reply to Alessa69

Yes sure

I will

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elliebath

Please do not worry about this angiogram. I have had two in the last three years.

It is not painful and believe me I do not like pain.! But if you've been offered anxiety medication then you'll be relaxed and sail through .

Surely it's far better to have this test and find out early if any blockages.

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Kaklong75
Kaklong75
in reply to elliebath

Oh really?

Thank you for the advise.

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Careful1
Careful1
in reply to Sunnie2day

Dont be afraid, I had one when I was 28 years old and it did not hurt at all, not even a little. It felt weird but not painful. I think laying down flat for a bunch of hours was the worst part for me. I had a lot of anxiety prior but they gave me something to make me feel at ease.

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Kaklong75
Kaklong75
in reply to Careful1

Wow

Glad to hear that

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MichaelJH
MichaelJHHeart Star

Hello and welcome to the forum! First off get health information from reliable sites like the BHF and NHS ones. Just Googling or going on Facebook is likely to give you totally out-of-date or incorrect information! Everything carries a risk even getting out of bed - a friend ruptured his archilles tendon doing so but he still gets up every morning.

I have had angioplasty to the left leg and an angiogram. The only slight pain was the small prick from the needle when they administer the local anaesthetic. If you are nervous you can have a sedative. Personally I don't preferring to watch the screen to see the cause of my angina. Not going through with it means the cardiologists may not be able to diagnose and treat a serious problem!

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Kaklong75
Kaklong75
in reply to MichaelJH

Thank you.

I know how strong you are.

This heart broken syndrome Don't need angio.

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HiddenThis reply has been deleted
Kaklong75
Kaklong75
in reply to Hidden

The broken heart syndrome just make your heart bigger than usual.

No blocked/narrow arteries

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Alessa69
Alessa69
in reply to Kaklong75

Do you trust your Medical team?

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Kaklong75
Kaklong75
in reply to Alessa69

Yes

But sometimes I think they are also a human being.

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Sunnie2day

Good point - they ARE people, just people with specialised training in a field we don't have the same training in. I trust my cardiologist but I always remember he is a person - he could have a good day, he could have a bad day.

One of the reasons I feel confidence in him is he is willing to listen, and as long as I'm polite, he's willing to be 'argued' with. I hope yours is the same, it makes such difference!

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Kaklong75
Kaklong75
in reply to MichaelJH

Wow

Nice suggestion

Thank you

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MichaelJH
MichaelJHHeart Star
in reply to Kaklong75

Sorry, is that the sedative? The problem is as I understand it blocked /narrowed arteries can mimic broken heart.

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Kaklong75
Kaklong75
in reply to MichaelJH

Broken heart just make your heart blogger than usual.nothing blocked/narrow arteries

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Kaklong75
Kaklong75
in reply to Kaklong75

Sorry

#bigger

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MichaelJH
MichaelJHHeart Star
in reply to Kaklong75

Your cardiolgist would not have requested an angiogram without good reason. Ring the cardiolgy department - they may have someone who can offer you support.

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Kaklong75
Kaklong75
in reply to MichaelJH

Thank you.

Of course they do it for the reason

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Milkfairy
MilkfairyHeart Star

Hi Kaklong75

I have had 2 angiograms.

Tell your doctor how you are feeling and you can be given some medication to help make feel more relaxed and calm during the angiogram.

Broken heart syndrome is now more commonly called Takotsubo syndrome/ cardiomyopathy.

The BHF has some information and Cardiomyopathy UK is also a good resource.

bhf.org.uk/informationsuppo...

cardiomyopathy.org/takotsub...

I hope this helps.

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Happyme123

I have heard of having a broken heart and I’ve experienced what I would call a pain in my heart when I’m really upset but I never knew that there’s an actual condition. Thanks for the link Milkfairy, I’ve learnt something today ❤️

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Kaklong75

Yes

Same for me

I don't know heart broken can cause you a heart attack

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Milkfairy
MilkfairyHeart Star
in reply to Kaklong75

Takostubo Cardiomyopathy is now not thought to cause a heart attack in the true definition of a heart attack.

It does lead to a release of really high levels of Troponin a chemical released into the blood when the heart's muscle is damaged and then the classic change to the shape of the heart to make it look like a Japanese octopus pot hence the name.

Along with ECG changes and chest pain.

The angiogram usually shows that the coronary arteries are not blocked.

Prof Dana Dawson here in the UK is a leading researcher into the condition.

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Kaklong75
Kaklong75
in reply to Milkfairy

Yes i knew it

Thank you for your information

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Kaklong75
Kaklong75
in reply to Milkfairy

Thank you

I will read that information

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Kaklong75
Kaklong75
in reply to Milkfairy

Thank you for your comment

I appriciate it

Sorry if my English is broken

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Milkfairy
MilkfairyHeart Star
in reply to Kaklong75

No problem.

I hope you are able to feel reassured and be more at ease about having an angiogram.

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Kaklong75
Kaklong75
in reply to Milkfairy

My confident now is about 50/50

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Kaklong75
Kaklong75
in reply to Milkfairy

Thanks a lot

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Hatchjd

As a patient you have the right to refuse any recommended testing but it means you may not get the right diagnosis or timely treatment. The problem with medical things is fear. We avoid going to the doctor or having tests as we don’t want a bad result and may think it would be better not knowing. We always hear medical stories of things that go wrong as these make news. Angiogram is very safe and low risk when performed as a planned diagnostic procedure.

This board is here to help share information and experiences so we have more information to deal with scary situations and can make better decisions about our health.

Broken heart syndrome can mimic heart attack or angina and the only way to get an accurate diagnosis is with an angio. Its purpose is to diagnose and treat acute heart problems so the angio room is the safest place to be if you have a heart event.

I had an angio via the wrist in July. I was awake during the procedure. It was uncomfortable putting the sheath in the wrist, equivalent to numbing and filings at the dentist. The dye part of the test was painless. They found a 90% and an 80% blockage that was stented. I did have a burning feeling in my chest for a minute or so when the stents were inserted otherwise there was minimal discomfort. Prior to having the angio I had experienced one 30 minute episode of jaw tingling, but no chest pain. I was fearful of the angio but the real risk to my life was not the procedure but the 90% blockage I was unaware of.

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Kaklong75
Kaklong75
in reply to Hatchjd

The great comment.

Thank you

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Happyme123

I found the procedure no problem at all, the staff were great, there was music playing in the theatre and I was fascinated watching the screen . I am so grateful that we have access to such great medical staff and equipment. Honestly it is not something to be afraid of. ❤️

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Kaklong75

Wow.

Nice to hear that.

Thank you

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HampshireLass

Honest, not so bad as it sounds. The Dentist frightens me more.

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Kaklong75

Lol

What is the funny comment .

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LaceyLady

It’s sticking your head in the sand! I did it, didn’t enjoy it, the rather warm liquid wasn’t great, but it’s a diagnostic test and it’s silly not to do it. I’m a Complementary Therapist a can be a against invasion

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Kaklong75
Kaklong75
in reply to LaceyLady

Yes

You should try it but your own

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Tinalef

I had an angiogram 2 years ago. I'm terrified of needles! Procedure was fine, no pain. Just telll the person doing angio how you feel. They're great.

Discovered I had a 50/60blocked LAD. No stent needed yet, but at least I know about it

So I'd say go for it. Good luck.

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Kaklong75

Oh thank you tinalef

I am 50/50 now to do it or not

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Frenchbulldogsx

In the UK any procedure costs the NHS a lot of money, the medical team do not request that you have it done for no reason. As others have said it is the main diagnostic tool for anything heart related.

I've had 2, one in 2017 and one this year. Yes uncomfortable but I would not say painful. The team are professional and know what they are doing. Both of mine were accessed through my wrists, which is a quicker recovery as with access through the groin, you need to lay down for a number of hours after the procedure.

I for one was anxious but you must trust the experts.

Get it done, there's no choice if you value your life.

Don't ever take notice of Facebook 😔

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Kaklong75

Thank you

I don't know what to said now.

Most of you want me to do it.

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Sunnie2day

I just did a search for NHS costs and found the pdf table for costs to non-eligible NHS patients or the private non-covered by insurance costs for those who need it quicker than NHS waits and so choose to go private.

Honestly, my eyeballs about fell out of my head at the cost - £3000 for an uncomplicated angiogram (simple straightforward procedure with just the dye, no stents, and no overnight hospitalisation).

Next time I whinge about my private insurance premium I'm going to remind myself what going private without that insurance would have cost me for the hopefully uncomplicated angio I'm booked for Wednesday. My 'catastrophic' clause covers the procedure (and if it goes wonky, my insurance covers that as well, phew!) and I will never again complain about that monthly debit!

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Kaklong75

It is good to you to have insurans cover on it

I have nothing event a single penny

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elliebath

When I was younger and in good health, I had private health insurance with my now-EX husband. Shortly after, as a new divorcee in my fifties I felt I couldn't afford to continue the £175 per month premium and so I cancelled it. Big regret!!! This year I waited 8 weeks for an nhs angiogram and a further 6 weeks to see the cardiologist.

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Sunnie2day

I know so many widowed or divorced singles in the same spot. My private pension pays my premium here in the UK (just) and I feel guilty about using it when I think someone more unwell than I am has to wait longer than I do.

I felt so badly about it, actually, that I brought it up with the cardiologist who didn't hesitate to correct me - 'Anyone more unwell is priority over you, trust me!' (He thinks I'm worse than I think I am, if that makes any sense)

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elliebath

Thats a reassuring reply from your cardiologist anyway. In my case the annoying thing is that I could afford the premium, but back at that time I was nervous about my outgoings .... and to start again would mean some pre-existing health exclusions as well as rocketing cost.

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Kaklong75
Kaklong75
in reply to elliebath

I have no comment.

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Kaklong75

Doctor know you better than your self.

Believe me

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Kaklong75
Kaklong75
in reply to elliebath

I hope somebody here can help you.

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jerry12953

Thanks for the comments which helped me decide that I really must go through with the angiogram that has been recommended for me. It doesn't sound too bad! Pity the hospital is 80 miles away........

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Kaklong75

Congratulation

Go on buddy

They give me and other good inspiration.Doing angio is not a bad things..

Best of luck.

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CraftyGirl72

I have broken heart syndrome (or takotsubot cardiomyopathy) which was only confirmed after the consultant got results from my angiogram.

No blockages, only enlarged heart... family history made them check "just in case" and if the asked me to do again I would... finding out your heart will heal is the best news you can get!

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Kaklong75

Thank you

Glad to hear that

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Palpman

All I felt was a scratching on my wrist throughout the whole procedure. No pain whatsoever and no feeling down my arm or around my heart. I was quite bored actually.

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Kaklong75
Kaklong75
in reply to Palpman

Wow

You feel nothing

I hope to feel Like you too

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Leeds7

There really isn’t anything to be afraid of. Believe it or not, but it is true. I’ve had 6 angiograms with stents fitted on 3 different occasions. Admittedly I’m still suffering with problems that they can’t work out what is wrong. But what I’m saying is, have the angio, you’ll be fine.

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Kaklong75
Kaklong75
in reply to Leeds7

6 Times

I never think about it

Once for me too annoying me

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melville999

I was scared too.Very scared.But this was just me.It is normal to not want to have a test.But my angiogram showed me why my heart was struggling.I didn't need stents.But it gave me useful info as to why my heart was unhappy.I take my meds,lost some weight.

my mum had broken heart( when I was ill with gut problems).Then a heart attack.She had angio too.

At 89 she is still up trees sawing branches.

angio is useful.It can give you information to help you to heal.Do not be ashamed to feel scared.This is normal.I got a bit of sedative.

It is riskier to not have angio than have it.

you can heal.

Broken hearts can mend.

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Kaklong75

Oh what a beautiful comment i get.....thank you dear

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Osidge

People with broken heart syndrome may have sudden chest pain or think they're having a heart attack. Broken heart syndrome affects just part of the heart, temporarily disrupting your heart's normal pumping function. The rest of the heart continues to function normally or may even have more forceful contractions.

The symptoms of broken heart syndrome are treatable, and the condition usually reverses itself in days or weeks.

A temporary constriction of the large or small arteries of the heart has been suspected to play a role. People who have broken heart syndrome may also have a difference in the structure of the heart muscle.

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Kaklong75
Kaklong75
in reply to Osidge

Yes

But my heart keep swallo for 5 years.

Nothing change.

I still get pain in my chest until now

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Osidge
Osidge
in reply to Kaklong75

All the more reason for having the investigation!!

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Kaklong75
Kaklong75
in reply to Osidge

I do agree with you

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Milkfairy
MilkfairyHeart Star
in reply to Osidge

'A temporary constriction of the large or small arteries of the heart has been suspected to play a role'

The above is a description of Coronary Vasospastic angina, Microvascular angina or Coronary Artery Spasms. ( my specialist subject as I have lived with both vasospasms in my small and large blood vessels for 7 years)

Takostubo Cardiomyopathy is an extreme reaction of the heart muscle due to stress. Though Prof Dana Dawson' a research is also suggesting an association with systemic inflammation

abdn.pure.elsevier.com/en/p...

bhf.org.uk/informationsuppo...

cardiomyopathy.org/takotsub...

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Kaklong75
Kaklong75
in reply to Milkfairy

Yes

I really stress once till I got it

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Osidge
Osidge
in reply to Milkfairy

I guess that issues with the arteries might play a role in a number of heart conditions.

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Milkfairy
MilkfairyHeart Star
in reply to Osidge

Yes it is the Cardiovascular system.

However the coronary arteries of patients with Takostubo Cardiomyopathy are usually not blocked and do not go into spasm. It is a disorder of the heart muscle itself.

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Osidge
Osidge
in reply to Milkfairy

From the Mayo Clinic:

Causes

The exact cause of broken heart syndrome is unclear. It's thought that a surge of stress hormones, such as adrenaline, might temporarily damage the hearts of some people. How these hormones might hurt the heart or whether something else is responsible isn't completely clear.

A temporary constriction of the large or small arteries of the heart has been suspected to play a role. People who have broken heart syndrome may also have a difference in the structure of the heart muscle.

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Kaklong75
Kaklong75
in reply to Osidge

Yes

Make it sense

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Milkfairy
MilkfairyHeart Star
in reply to Osidge

This is not what Prof Dana Dawson a leading researcher into the condition, the BHF nor Cardiomyopathy UK are suggesting through more recent research.

The Mayo Clinic article is probably out of date as it is also using an out dated term.

As Takostubo cardiomyopathy is affecting the function of the heart muscle itself the term Cardiomyopathy is probably more scientifically appropriate.

The European Society of Cardiology use the term Takostubo syndrome in their guidelines published in 2018.

It lists the possible causes at the end of the article.

academic.oup.com/eurheartj/...

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Kaklong75
Kaklong75
in reply to Milkfairy

Need to see a pshco?

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Milkfairy
MilkfairyHeart Star
in reply to Kaklong75

Many of us with heart conditions whatever the cause sometimes need help to find ways of managing our stress and anxiety.

Some centres here in the UK provide Cardiac or Clinical psychologists.

Other stratergies can be using cognitive behavioural therapy ( CBT) , Mindfulness meditation, Tai Chi and yoga.

Perhaps go and talk to your GP to ask for further psychological support.

Quite a few of us use this free app of meditations it may help

insighttimer.com/

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Kaklong75
Kaklong75
in reply to Milkfairy

Yes i install that

It is a free aplication or buyer One?

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Milkfairy
MilkfairyHeart Star
in reply to Kaklong75

It's free

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Kaklong75
Kaklong75
in reply to Milkfairy

Oh i see

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Osidge
Osidge
in reply to Milkfairy

In relation to the OP, it is quite clear from the paper you referenced that an angiogram is needed for diagnostic purposes.

“As TTS is clinically difficult to distinguish from ACS, upon first presentation patients should be transferred to a cardiology unit with imaging capabilities and a cardiac catheterization laboratory and receive guideline based treatment of ACS”

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Kaklong75
Kaklong75
in reply to Milkfairy

Oh Yes.

I do agree with you

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Kaklong75
Kaklong75
in reply to Osidge

Perhaps

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dragonheart

there is no pain love i can assure you dont skip it beath deep you will be fine

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Kaklong75

Oh thank you

I hope so

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Dillydog

I had a n angiogram 10 months ago didn't feel a thing going in saw the picks brilliant left heart elongated cardiomyopathy with apariel ballooning.

we are going to remove it now and your finished wonderful says me, the it happens my vein is in spasm and they cant get it out, doctors running around panicking, the pain was becoming really bad and I was fainting, the squeezed my arm for 15 minuets and then pulled it out the pain was indescribable. i was then sent to intensive care where my are was held above my head in a sling for 4 hours as they couldn't stop the bleeding it was pouring out, it was black for 4 weeks after, I think i was just unlucky.

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Kaklong75
Kaklong75
in reply to Dillydog

Oh how pitty you are.

Sorry to hear that

1 like
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