2019-7-September : After my second... - Advanced Prostate...

Advanced Prostate Cancer

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2019-7-September

Geanton profile image

After my second chemo my PSA came down to 3.8 yesterday I had my third chemo DOCEtaxel 300 ml (taxotere)r doing okay but white blood count went down 10.4 to 5.8 my Neutrophils count on September-4-2019 3

27 Replies

Are you getting Neulasta? You need it.

Geanton profile image
Geanton in reply to CantChoose

Thanks

Thanks

That's correct. You have to look at the absolute neutrophil count, not the percentage. That is one of the most important things to watch.

Geanton profile image
Geanton in reply to gregg57

Thanks

I'm not sure that is true of "most." At Cedars, for example, they give Neulasta routinely. I like it for another reason too: it amps up the immune response at a time when the chemo has dumped a lot of cancer antigens into systemic circulation. Thus, it may increase the absopal/bystander effect - immune cells get programmed to destroy cancer systemically. I prefer Provenge, which contains GM-CSF.

I'm surprised that this isn't common. My husband gets it for each chemo. His white counts are normal, or even a bit high. MO doesn't like to wait until it's low.

It would be interesting to see a survey. And insurance companies may effect its use.

in reply to Tall_Allen

You are correct, I shouldn't have used the word "most". For all intents and purposes I was somewhat quoting Dr. Maha Hussain ,(my oncologist when my Docetaxel was administrated) when I made the comment " Most oncologists prefer not to use Neulasta unless it becomes necessary. They would rather monitor your bodies ability to produce white blood cells without the use of "helper" drugs". She was of the opinion to monitor closely my body's ability to produce wbc's while under duress. Maybe her opinion has changed since moving on to Northwestern.

CantChoose profile image
CantChoose in reply to

So... Hussein is also my husband's doc. We get Neulasta every time.

He had a crisis earlier in the year requiring transfusion, so maybe Neulasta isn't typically orescribed by her (or Northwestern) and I just didn't realize it.

It's definitely a double-edged sword. The body aches are substantial.

in reply to CantChoose

Please read what I said above once more "Maybe her opinion has changed since moving on to Northwestern.". When she was my oncologist, it wasn't at Northwestern. Perhaps it's Northwestern's policy to administer neulasta to everyone going through chemo. Think $$$. If your trying to bait me into an argument by attempting to embarrass me, sorry but I have been in this rodeo a helluva lot longer than you. My communications with you are over. Best of luck to you both and goodbye.

Hankster profile image
Hankster in reply to

Man, chill out.

Man, it's none of your business. Who are you to interfere with two parties having an intelligent, civil disagreement? "Best of luck to you both and goodbye". sure doesn't seem like a statement to "chill out" over.

If that is your idea of a civil disagreement I certainly pity you. and the way you responded to me all I did was say chill out. Take your anger out on someone else.

Hankster profile image
Hankster in reply to Hankster

If you post it on this forum it's everybody's business.

Hankster profile image
Hankster in reply to Hankster

I was just same chill out because I thought you responded in a very angry manner that wasn't necessary. Anyway I will not post any more here I'm done with this conversation.

CantChoose profile image
CantChoose in reply to

Was certainly not trying to "bait" you - - just thought it was a cute coincidence.

My husband has only had this cancer a few months so I have no idea if what we're getting for care is normal. Sorry if I somehow offended you.

Caring7 profile image
Caring7 in reply to CantChoose

Try taking Clariting starting 2 days before Neulasta and a week after. This seems to be common knowledge and approved by our MO although thereʻs not been a study that I know of and no one is quite sure why. But it really does seem to work on the body aches from Neulasta.

My husband went one Taxotere without it but yeah, his white cells were so low that he now gets it every time. He was barely normal with counts before cancer so . . . I do think most insurance covers it (cheaper than transfusion! or other complications of infection).

Best wishes

Schwah profile image
Schwah in reply to Tall_Allen

You prefer Provenge in lieu of chemo or in lieu of neulasta?

Tall_Allen profile image
Tall_Allen in reply to Schwah

No- I prefer Provenge with chemo in lieu of Neulasta with chemo. Neulasta contains GC-SF which stimulates neutrophils. Provenge contains GM-CSF (and other components) which is a wider range immune stimulant.

Geanton profile image
Geanton in reply to Tall_Allen

Gm-csf can You tell me what it is please thanks

Tall_Allen profile image
Tall_Allen in reply to Geanton

Because chemo can deplete the cells that produce white blood cells, a white blood cell stimulant (a "cytokine") can be given with it. GM-CSF (granulocyte macrophage colony stimulating factor) is a cytokine that stimulates production of many kinds of white blood cells. It is part of Provenge. Neulasta contains a similar cytokine, GC-SF (granulocyte colony stimulating factor) that stimulates production of one type of white blood cells, neutrophils, particularly.

Geanton profile image
Geanton in reply to Tall_Allen

Thanks

I was hospitalized twice once for a low neutrophil count and an intermittent fever after the first session after the second session I had an appendicitis attack and had emergency surgery. Going forward I get a Neulasta shot the day after each session because of my past history.

Cheerr profile image
Cheerr in reply to Hex40

Hi did you go to the ER after noticing intermittent fever of 100.4 F over few days?? And did they check your blod work and conclude the WBC/Neutrophils were low?

For each of my 13 Docetaxel/Carboplatin chemo infusions I have left with an On Body Injector of Neulasta to boost white blood cells. It can cause bone pain, so Med Onc recommends taking Claritin for 7 days, beginning the day before infusion. Pricey, but Medicare and Supplemental pay for all of it.

Best Wishes. Never Give In.

Mark, Atlanta

Geanton profile image
Geanton in reply to vandy69

Thanks

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