Advanced Prostate Cancer
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Epigenetics: How It Works And What It Means for Cancer ResearchPublished: January 10, 2018

interesting, and encouraging:

blog.dana-farber.org/insigh...

"Possibilities for Cancer Therapy

Methyl groups, enzymes, and other DNA accessories, collectively known as epigenetic markers, keep cells on the straight and narrow path, ensuring they divide in an orderly manner and remain true to their nature – that a lung cell, for example, doesn’t suddenly become a kidney cell. One of the most striking features of cancer cells is that the patterns of these markers are altered. This can allow cancer-related genes to become overactive, and disable genes that normally keep cell growth in check.

As scientists map ever more of the epigenetic disruptions that occur in cancer, the implications for cancer therapy are becoming increasingly evident. Unlike genetic mutations, epigenetic changes are potentially reversible. This raises the possibility that drugs capable of returning epigenetic markers to their normal setting could be extraordinarily effective in cancer. A few such drugs have already been approved for certain cancer types, and dozens more are being tested in clinical trials.

Learn more about cancer research from Dana-Farber."

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This is in reference to Dana Farber"s new work on the nanotization of the PARP inhibitor, Olaparib, which I have Posted on---since there is literally a dozen PARP, and Checkpoint Inhibitors ready to hit the Trial Phase---the nanoization, brings a whole new perspective to the party--where the drug can get down to the molecular level for the repair of DNA in mutations.

If you read the release this weekend, The FDA just approved a PARP Inhibitor, for Metastatic Breast Cancer---specifically to those women that have the BRCA Gene Mutation---many men here including myself also have the BRCA Gene Mutation----as we have found that Olaparib, having originally been designed for Cervical Cancer---with the BRCA mutation; is now being used off label for metastatic prostate cancer.

The interesting thing---since many Breast Cancers and Prostate Cancers share the same Hormonal Induced Gene DNA defect---and unfortunately there is more research dollars going into Breast Cancer than Prostate Cancer--- but, we with Pca, get the opportunity to use drugs designed for women, off label of course. Where has our FDA, gone wrong again---they do not have enough understanding to bridge the gap between men and women with the same inherited gene mutations. IMO, they just are behind the curve as to immunology research, and studies--and cannot react out of the box--just stodgy gov't officials, from industry, and political appointees with big deal unusable science degrees. I would like to line them up against a wall----and you know what!!!!!!!

Nalakrats

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I don't understand why they can't fast-track this stuff!!! GRRRRR!!!!!

fwiw - just read a man's story on the Metastatic Prostate Cancer FB Page - sounds like Keytruda may have 'cured' him - but only time will tell. Here's an excerpt and link:

facebook.com/groups/1233994...

" in my case I was negative for BRIP-1, and BRACA 1/2, I lost a sister to BC at 46 10 yrs ago and testing was done on some of her remaining pathology to compare to mine, inconclusive results, I'm the only one carrying this rare POLE -1 mutation that has only been found in female hormonal cancers...records done by my medical team shows no other PC affliction of this Gene, treatment for it calls out for checkpoint inhibitors immunotherapy pembriluzmab."

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Yes pemb. is also recommended today for those with PTEN--which I have with my BRCA.

I did a quick check---and there are subjects treated with combinations of Checkpoint Inhibitors, but no results or further info--as to POLE-1---if you did your homework, this Mutation is more associated with Colon Cancer, and Pancreatic Cancer---A friends father was treated for Pca 15 years ago, got a remission---and then later got Colon Cancer----and that was the end.

I would add Colonoscopies---to my annual tests---maybe every 2 years--as we do not have a pro-active test for Pancreatic, that I am aware of.

Nalakrats

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Hi Nalakrats, some very bad news today from my husband's CT scan. The PC has moved to his liver. Oncologist recommends starting chemo ASAP - in 2 days: carboplatin + taxol, 6 treatments, every 3 weeks if tolerable. He gave a 33% chance it will help, otherwise he said prognosis is 6 mo's. When I asked about Keytruda, because my husband has the PTEN, he said it's not for those with PTEN. Could he be wrong?? Any encouraging words of wisdom?

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No just prayers for a great outcome.Get yourself on lots of Prayer Chains---it is time for God to take over. By the way the Combo Chemo is very effective as to the liver.

Nalakrats

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Thank you, and good to know about that chemo combo. I saw someone else used carboplatin + etoposide, and wonder what the difference is.

Some hope here regarding mets to the liver:

mskcc.org/cancer-care/types...

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Hi, that blog may have been removed from the Dana Farber site, I’m getting an error message on the link. No blog entry for Jan 10, and a search on the site for the title gets nothing!

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