Advanced Prostate Cancer
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Here we Go Jevtana and Carboplatin #1

In the waiting room now for his first infusion. My nerves are a 10/10 I am so afraid, worried scared.. all these emotions. Listening to the scary side effects.. worried about rare reactions. Any experiences with these please let me know. It might help me calm my nerves!!!! Thank you all wish us luck and prayers that we can fight and win!!!!

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Just remember you are not alone. The spirit of hope swirls around you. We are not with you physically, but we are all present spiritually. Have faith in hope and the resolve of goodness.

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Thank you!

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Praying for you and your Dad, We are all here for you. That will be my next treatment. Keep us posted how things go Please.

Dan

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Thank you!

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I hope all goes well and I know that you've read a ton of our experiences on this forum. This brotherhood has your back and please say "Hey" from me.

Fight On - Randy

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Thank you Randy, i did share your story and accomplishments with my father. It gives him hope that he will make it through! Thank you my heart goes out to each and everyone on this site.

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Praying for you and your Dad for a great outcome. I wish Peace of Mind for you both - the best medicine of all...

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🙏🏻 thank you

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I understand how you feel. My thoughts and prayers are with you and your father. You'll both make it through.

Sincerely,

Erika

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I firmly believe that it is harder on our caregivers than it is on us. My heart goes you to you and your whole family. Please remember that rare side effects are called that for a reason. They are rare. At the same time, please focus on the most important side effect of treatment, that your dad gets better.

Wishes and prayers are going your way. You are not alone. We are with you. Everyone here is pulling for your father. Remember “people like us we have to stick together “. We are sticking with you!

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We are with you right now in our thoughts and prayers. A lot of us that have been through chemo already can really relate to those fears, especially the first time. You don't know what to expect so it's frightening. My experience has been that it was far better than I had imagined. After the first time you have a better feel for what to expect so that takes the fear away. Yes there are side effects, but there are also medications to ease them. Hang in there and remember we are with you.

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Thank you! Reading all the posts calmed me and my father. He was fine through the 2 chemo treatments. Tomorrow he gets the self- injection of neulasta. Did you also receive this? How was the bone pain? I read and also was recommended to have him take Zyrtec. When does he start today or day of the injection?

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My blood counts were high enough that I didn't need the neulesta. I've heard that it really helps a lot. I did have some pain periodically during the chemo, but I also have that now, 4 months after chemo. It wasn't that bad, Ibuprofen was enough to take care of mine. I have not heard of taking Zyrtec.

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I did not do Nuelasta when I did chemo, but I am sure I read on some post that Claritin helps with side effects of Nuelasta, On further reading I see that claritin and zyrtec are fairly similar. I did find this on a Breast cancer site regarding nuelasta and claritin, I assume it would be the same for zyrtec community.breastcancer.org/...

Dan

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Good Morning Daddysdaughter,

On Tuesday I completed 6 cycles of Docetaxel/Carboplatin combo chemo. Each time I left with the On Body Injector of Neulasta which self injects exactly 27 hours after placement.

My Med Onc recommended taking a Claritin pill for 6 days, beginning the day before chemo, to minimize bone pain from Neulasta. Has worked for me!

I have iced my hands and feet with every infusion plus take a daily 100mg B6 pill to mitigate neuropathy, again per Med Onc. So far, so good.

Best wishes. Never Give In.

Mark, Atlanta

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Our prayers are with you both! 🙏

James

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One of the most annoying non-fatal complications of chemo is peripheral neuropathy.

Mild in some and relatively short duration, In my case,numb fingertips that lasted ~ 6-9 months.. Others not so lucky.-hands and feet numb and permanent.

Had I had more time to read up on chemo or been a member of this forum,I would have learned that keeping your hands and/or feet in really ice cold water or some cooling device helps.

My late sister used a cooling cap device that they have in some cancer centers that prevented her from losing her hair.

use the search function on this forum to look these things up as well as suggested dietary suuplements. Don't know how well the supplements work but no downside so why not try?

Best wishes

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I actually had everything with me to ice his feet and hands. It was just a very long day and he didn’t really want to do it. Maybe the next one he will be more up to it.

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Thank you, yes- we will try icing fingers and toes for the next infusion. He doesn’t really care much about the hair loss, just his mustache (LOL). He is on supplements but no antioxidants (green tea, pomegranate).

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Well, let him know that my eyebrows haven't returned and the last chemo was on 12/17/15. I'm full Chinese and couldn't grow a 'stache even when I had Testosterone :-)

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That’s funny. I will let him know - Lol! He has lots of brows so if he looses some hair not a problem.! Thank you for your continued support. May you be blessed with the best health!

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Lolol

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To “Daddy” and his incredible daughter

Going through six cycles of early chemotherapy in conjunction with ADT was fearful for us, too, but the actual experience of it went smoothly and without any nausea, infections, or illness. There was much support and conversation with others in the infusion room which made the time go more quickly. The lost hair has partially returned but is still sparse and has a strange texture, i.e. a visual negative but the least of our worries! Leswell had no resulting peripheral neuropathy or loss of taste sensations; I made sure his hands and feet were on ice and that he had ice cubes to suck on during the time of the Taxotere (rather than Jevtana) infusions. (Maybe your dad will permit that next time.) Neulasta, we felt, was a blessing since his white blood cell counts remained high. The convenience of having it kick in at home the next day was an added plus. The most positive result was the huge reduction in bone mets and two lymph nodes in the groin which were no longer cancerous. The worst result of the chemotherapy by far was the month by month increase in the size of his legs which turned out to be lymphedema, a permanent and disabling condition. BUT he’s still alive even though his initial GS was a horrific 7 + 9. I’m not trying to make light in any way of what you and your dad are going through. We are praying that when these treatments conclude, there will be far less of the cancer and much more of hope to stay the course until there WILL BE a cure for your father and my husband and everyone we love on this site. Mrs. S

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P.S. We shoveled snow today in MN. It felt good to be outside in spite of the cold. I had to stop once to catch my breath. Leswell can still shovel circles around me! Life is good. We can’t wait for the NFL games this weekend—especially our Vikings.

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I really appreciate the wealth of information and experience you and Hubby have provided. Makes me feel like i have many brothers and sisters out there going through the same. This site has made such a difference in this journey that all of us are going through. I compliment all he effort by each and everyone of us. We just got back from there visiting my sister and going to Mayo on January 4th. We are true Californians it was toooo tooo cold for us there! Yes Go Vikings!!

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Hi, my name is Lynn, my husband is seventy four has has stage four prostrate cancer, been on this journey since age sixty five. Many scary operations, treatments, many hospital stays, sleepless nights.

I want to say we all know how you are feeling, we are All here for you!!. Try hard to relax, I know it's easier said then done. Went to surgeon yesterday for some cancerous lymph nodes, I like you was jumping put of my skin. Sam will be operated this coming Friday the 19th. Hospital stay only three days.

Please know I'm here for you , along with everyone in this the group. I'm praying for you and your Dad.

Your Dad will be just fine!!!! God Bless! 🙏🏻

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Thank you, as I will pray for your husband a speedy recovery and the strength to beat this! My dad is strong, Day 1 post chemo he is in good spirits, and feels great. It’s unbelievable how my mood and how I feel changes when i see my dad is not symptomatic. I pray that he stays this way and Chemo kills this forever!! Thank you and everyone for all the support. My prayers to all fighting a battle.

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Happy to hear you are feeling better. My husband is also a very strong man, I can relate to what you are saying. when my husband is in better spirits it makes me feel better too! I do think that as caregivers we get more anxious at times. We are going this Frid. The 19th to have a cancerous lymph node removed. Just another bump in the road.

Prayers and best wishes! 🙏🏻 I know after thiese chemo treatments your Dsd will be here for many many more decades and Feeling back to himself. Take care and know we are all here for you and your Dad. We are in this together.

Sincerely, Lynn

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With a daughter like you, he'll be just fine. Give him a big kiss and hug from all of us.

Good Luck and Good Health.

j-o-h-n Saturday 01/13/2018 11:33 AM EST

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Thank you!! I am blessed and lucky to have such amazing parents.

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Gods speed to you guys and blessings.....much love

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Blessings On Both Of You.

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