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Without Action, Drug-Resistant “Superbugs” Will Kill Millions in Europe

BadHare
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Without Action, Drug-Resistant “Superbugs” Will Kill Millions in Europe

A report also concludes that an investment of $2 per person per year could forestall that fate.

Nov 8, 2018

Ashley P. Taylor

Antibiotic-resistant infections could kill 2.4 million people in Europe, North America, and Australia by 2050 without further action to combat the infections, according to a report released yesterday (November 7) by the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development. But the report also says that short-term investments by governments could push back against diseases and save money in the long run.

“Drug-resistant superbugs are on the rise worldwide and represent a fundamental threat to global health and development. This report provides yet further evidence that investing to tackle the problem now will save lives and deliver big payoffs in the future,” Tim Jinks, head of the Wellcome Trust’s drug-resistant infections priority program, tells The Guardian.

Among the 36 member countries of the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD), resistance to second- and third-line antibiotics—the most advanced drugs available to treat infections after initial rounds fail—is expected to be 70 percent higher in 2030 than it was in 2005, according to a press release.

The report suggests that to combat the superbug rise, governments use tactics such as promoting hygiene practices, such as hand washing, and ending over-prescribing of antibiotics. For $2 per person per year, three out of four deaths from superbugs could be averted, according to the release.

“Investing $2 per person per year in a comprehensive package encompassing public health measures would avoid about 47,000 deaths per year in OECD countries,” Michele Cecchini of the OECD’s health division tells CNBC. “The public health package could pay for itself within just one year and end up by saving $4.8 billion of dollars per year in OECD countries.”

the-scientist.com/news-opin...

4 Replies
Hidden
Hidden

Strange ive come across this post today because i think the cut on anti biotics has started because my daugter was refused anti antibotics yesterday because she had been prescribed anti biotics twice in september ! She was prescribed 2 because the first ones made her sick and then actually the second ones made her sick aswell and she ended up in hospital for treatment instead so now i wonder if there is a connection to these cuts were in november and she couldnt receive any anti biotics because all this in september. Were in the UK must be the same.

BadHare
BadHareAmbassador in reply to Hidden

Perhaps your doctor thinks your daughter's ill health is not caused by a bacterial infection, or they don't want to make her more ill if she's allergic to this form of medication. Hope she's better soon!

Hidden
Hidden in reply to BadHare

Yes maybe your right. Didnt think of this. Probably because this isnt what the gp said. She just said cant give you anymore because gave you 2 courses in september. She doesnt usually have a reaction to the anti biotics when taken in the past years just these 2 in sept was first time. Ahh well time will tell. Thanks for yr reply xx

BadHare
BadHareAmbassador in reply to Hidden

You’re welcome!

They’re best not being used as they affect our health badly, as well as the bacteria they suppose to kill off. Some countries only use them in hospitals, to prevent antibiotic resistance.

Hope your daughter if feeling better, but if she’s prone to infections, make sure she has a good diet with plenty of vitamin C & D3.