Generic or a Brand Name of thyroid medication? - Thyroid UK

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Generic or a Brand Name of thyroid medication?

Sandy287
Sandy287

Hi there,

Maybe some of you do remember that I quit my thyroid medication as new Euthyrox did not suit me. I am still feeling ok without any medication but my nephrologist recommended me to restart with 25 Mikro Gramm dosage. She prescribed Henning for me but pharmacy gave me Generic medication from Beta Pharm L Thyroxine saying it has no Mannitol either so I should not worry. But what I see it’s generic medication though price is same. But one positive thing I see that it has no Silicon dioxide like Henning. Still I’m confused, What do you recommend with your experience a generic medication will be ok or should take rather take Henning?

7 Replies
oldestnewest

Nobody can tell you that, because we're all different. The only way you can know if it will be ok is to try it. :)

shaws
shawsAdministrator

generic medications are usually copies of a 'named' one. There may be slight differences in the production but many people are fine on generics as well as the 'named' product. You can only give it a trial to see if it suits your body - longer than a few days - and as dose is increased, hopefully you'll find disabling symptoms are being resolved.

helvella
helvellaAdministrator

Generic versus branded might have some relevance with regard to medicines which have fairly recently come out of patent - you can expect the generic to be less expensive.

But when the original medicine was never patented in the first place (at least in the UK and the USA - not certain about elsewhere), and had it been patented it would have come out of patent something like sixty years ago, I am not sure it has any relevance at all.

What matters is the combination of getting a make that works for you and that you can get it consistently.

(I have personal experience of L-Thyroxin Henning and found it fine. I have never tried Beta Pharm but would be happy to do so.)

Thank you guys. Then I should give a try to it and will update you all. 😇

helvella
helvellaAdministrator in reply to Sandy287

Please do - reports about those makes unfamiliar to us are welcome.

If you are gluten intolerant, you should verify that the levo is GF via glutenfreedrugs.com (or UK equivalent), or via asking the manufacturer directly. Otherwise, whether a particular version of levo agrees with you, is a matter of trial-and-error. BTW, I am intolerant of even GF levo (Levoxyl) above 62mcg daily (higher dose causes anxiety); some people are intolerant of all levo. But, the majority of thyroid patients do tolerate levo on up to their maximum therapeutic dose.

helvella
helvellaAdministrator in reply to Eddie83

ALL UK medicines are officially gluten-free with the exception of a tiny number which contain obvious wheat ingredients.

Medication

The vast majority of medicines prescribed by your GP are gluten free

A very small number of medicines contain wheat starch which contains low levels of gluten. Wheat starch is one of many ingredients so even when wheat starch is used, the overall gluten content of the medicine is very low

In most cases, an alternative medicinal product can be prescribed which does not contain wheat starch

Sometimes medications can cause side effects that are similar to symptoms that occur after eating gluten. Speak to your GP if you have any unexpected side effects

Where wheat starch has not been used in a medicinal product, the product can be regarded as gluten free.

Wheat starch

The Medicines and Healthcare products Regulatory Agency (MHRA) is the government agency responsible for ensuring that medicines are acceptably safe. We have been in communication with the MHRA about the suitability of medicines containing wheat starch for people with coeliac disease.

Medication

If a medicine contains wheat starch, this will be written on the label and the patient information leaflet. The requirements for labelling means the label must state that the product contains wheat starch, and the patient leaflet states the following: “Suitable for people with coeliac disease. Patients with wheat allergy (different from coeliac disease) should not take this medicine”.

Wheat starch of pharmaceutical quality is highly processed and considered to be low in gluten, containing no more than 100 parts per million (ppm) of gluten. And, because it is mixed with other ingredients, the overall gluten content is very low.

In almost all cases an alternative medicine can be prescribed, in some cases containing the same active ingredient, and which does not contain wheat starch.

Anyone concerned should speak with their GP or pharmacist and request that their prescribed medicine is one that does not contain wheat starch.

Where wheat starch has not been used in a medicinal product, the product can be regarded as gluten free.

Side effects

Sometimes medications can cause side effects that are similar to symptoms that occur after accidentally eating gluten.

If you have any unexpected side effects when taking medications, speak to your GP.

Prescribed medications should only be taken or stopped under medical advice. Do not stop taking any medication without consulting your GP. Your GP is best placed to advise you regarding alternative medications or you can also speak to your pharmacist.

Talk to your doctor or pharmacist if you have any concerns about the medicines you are taking.

coeliac.org.uk/information-...

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