About people sending T3 from other countries - Thyroid UK

Thyroid UK
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About people sending T3 from other countries

Hello, I've been taking T3 only for around 18months and I have only just recently started to feel better (I had to get all the T4 out of my system first) and I have just tried to order some more Tiromel, from my supplier, and found that I cannot get hold of them. I am panicking now, I have around 6 weeks worth left so I am looking for somewhere else to get it from.

I have a cousin who lives in Spain - could I get him to get some for me? Is that possible? I don't want anyone to get into trouble, but I am getting desperate! I also have a friend in Australia - is it possible for her to send it to me? I am very confused about how to get a supply.

Thank you

Belle

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I have no idea as to the legality of sending T3 from Spain, Australia or anywhere else in terms of their local laws. However, it appears perfectly legal to be the recipient in the UK if it is solely for your use, and those in your household.

We have had many threads where people have discussed getting T3 in Spain. It appears to be very nearly impossible and, if prescribed for someone in Spain, is (usually? always?) imported from France.

I am almost certain that getting hold of any in Australia will require a prescription.

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Thank you. I wasn't sure.

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As I replied to your previous post asking the same thing, T3 in Australia requires a prescription and it would be illegal for anyone to share or give their prescription drug to another person.

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Thank you - good to know, I wasn't sure. Thanks again.

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Could you please clarify? If someone in Australia posts a pack of tablets to someone in the UK, is the act of sharing or giving actually taking place in Australia, under Australian laws? Or in the UK under UK laws?

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Will be intrested in replies!

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If someone in Australia breaks a law, in the first instance, the matter is surely one for Australian officials.

Excerpt from New South Wales Govt info:

Q. My friend has the same condition that I recently had. Can I give him my left-over medicine?

A. No. The medication you have been prescribed is suitable for your condition and may not be suitable for another person, even if you think they have the same problems. In some cases it may be harmful to them.

Also, it is unlawful to give (or 'supply') prescribed medication, and unlawful for someone to have (or 'possess') prescribed medication, that has not been dispensed for them on a prescription. If someone is harmed by the medication you give them, you may be held responsible for that harm.

So the rules are no different from those in the UK.

I'd doubt that some thyroid hormones would be a matter for international drug busting police intervention, such that the UK recipient would be tracked down; but would any one want to put their friend at risk of legal action?

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Thank you!

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But is sending some abroad the same as giving to a friend within Australia (according to Australian law)?

If the law is as you describe, it is different to the UK. Most prescription-only medicines can be in our possession - indeed, just reading a prescription form tells us that we can pick up prescriptions for other people. (Excepting Controlled Drugs.)

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Within the Misuse of Drugs Act 1971, the definition of "possession" is specific & pertains to controlled drugs: "The offence of possession of a controlled drug is committed when a person is unlawfully in physical possession or in control of any substance or product specified in Parts I, II or III of Schedule 2 of the Act". Further, The Misuse of Drugs Regulations 2001 allow for the lawful possession and supply of controlled drugs for legitimate purposes. So the legitimate collection and transporting of even controlled drugs to, and on behalf of the person to whom the drugs have been prescribed, would not be considered within the legal definition of possession. A patient's prescription for controlled drugs can in fact be collected by a third party - "If you're collecting controlled medication for someone else, you're legally required to show the pharmacist proof of your identity if asked.

To collect certain medicines, you'll need a letter from the patient giving you authorisation to act as their representative. The pharmacist will let you know what's required. To collect a Schedule 3-controlled medicine, such as flunitrazepam, you just need to sign the back of the prescription." (source: NHS). Australia has similar such rules. However these things are somewhat irrelevant to the original question of access to T3 in Australia; in that it is a prescription-only drug, and as such must not be given by the prescription-holder to someone else, for that person's use.

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You seem to be missing my point.

Is sending a package containing prescription-only medicines, when you are in Australia, considered to be giving?

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Any Australian lawyers on here?

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I'm coming to this, late in the conversation, but early in the morning, so forgive me if I'm off track.

I would see the person sending the medication to be the focus here.

If a prescription is taken up (for whatever), then given to another, then has that person breached the relevant regulations by committing prescription fraud? Taking a prescription they intend not to use themselves, then moving it on?

I can't speak for Australia here, but that could be considered to be defrauding the tax-payer in U.K.

As I'm assuming the person receiving the meds would be keen to receive enough to keep them supplied for some weeks, if not months, the amount could add up.

I doubt whether C&E would undertake dawn raids for a few T3 Tablets, but it's not something I would ask another person to do for me.

Bearing in mind, I could end up trying to source Liothyronine myself, I am very interested in this. I have no axe to grind, but my approach would be for great caution in implicating any other private individual. It's the sort of thing that could strain relationships at best, if the road gets bumpy.

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I would see the person sending the medication to be the focus here.

Yes - that was my point. I have no idea about Australian law and would not wish to see someone fall foul of that. (Obviously, applies to any country.)

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