Anxiety/panic attacks: Hello, I was hoping for... - Thyroid UK

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Anxiety/panic attacks

Peachy4130 profile image
Peachy4130

Hello,

I was hoping for some advice or support if possible.

I was diagnosed with Hashimoto in summer 2016. Recently I’ve been getting what I think are the physical signs of panic or anxiety attack (I don’t know if these are one and the same). My heart feels like is racing (but pulse is around 80bmp), trembling, dizzy, shaking hands.

I practice yoga & meditation daily- I feel like the only thing helping me keep it together (if that’s the right expression) is using mindfulness & meditation breathing to focus my breath.

I thought a panic attack was something that came on quick and last for a short period of time, not continued over a series of days. Is that correct? Or is that what is this is?

Not sure if this is relevant, but in case it is, my last results from Feb 2018 were:

TSH 2.9 (ranges 0.4-4)

T4 16.9(12-22)

(My GP doesn’t test for T3)

My next bloods are due in 2weeks and am currently on 75mcg Levothyroxine.

I think that maybe I’m still symptomatic (fatigue/ no energy/ weight issues/ foggy thinking/ extreme heavy periods/ falling hair/ ringing in ears & hearing problems - these are symptoms, aren’t they?!?)

But I’m wondering if this is also a symptom or is it something else?

I would really appreciate if anyone has any advise, similar experiences or wise words...unfortunately (aside from my husband) I’m not finding my family to be hugely supportive so I’m often second guessing how I’m feeling which I don’t think is helping!

Thank you in advance!

5 Replies
SlowDragon profile image
SlowDragonAdministrator

The aim of Levothyroxine replacement thyroid hormone is to increase dose slowly until TSH is around one and FT4 towards top of range

Official NHS guidelines saying TSH should be between 0.2 and 2.0 when on Levothyroxine

(Many of us need TSH nearer 0.2 than 2.0 to feel well)

See box

Thyroxine replacement in primary hypothyroidism

pathology.leedsth.nhs.uk/pa...

About 90% of all primary hypothyroidism in Uk is due to Hashimoto's

Essential to test vitamin D, folate, ferritin and B12.

Always get actual results and ranges. Post results when you have them, members can advise

Hashimoto's affects the gut and leads to low stomach acid and then low vitamin levels

Low vitamin levels affect Thyroid hormone working

Poor gut function can lead leaky gut (literally holes in gut wall) this can cause food intolerances. Most common by far is gluten.

According to Izabella Wentz the Thyroid Pharmacist approx 5% with Hashimoto's are coeliac, but over 80% find gluten free diet helps significantly. Either due to direct gluten intolerance (no test available) or due to leaky gut and gluten causing molecular mimicry (see Amy Myers link)

Changing to a strictly gluten free diet may help reduce symptoms, help gut heal and slowly lower TPO antibodies

Ideally ask GP for coeliac blood test first

amymyersmd.com/2017/02/3-im...

chriskresser.com/the-gluten...

thyroidpharmacist.com/artic...

scdlifestyle.com/2014/08/th...

drknews.com/changing-your-d...

thyroidpharmacist.com/artic...

For full Thyroid evaluation you need TSH, FT4, TT4, FT3 plus TPO and TG thyroid antibodies.

Plus very important to test vitamin D, folate, ferritin and B12

Private tests are available. Thousands on here forced to do this as NHS often refuses to test FT3 or vitamins

thyroiduk.org.uk/tuk/testin...

Medichecks Thyroid plus ultra vitamin or Blue Horizon Thyroid plus eleven are the most popular choice. DIY finger prick test or option to pay extra for private blood draw. Both companies often have money off offers.

All thyroid tests should ideally be done as early as possible in morning and fasting. If on Levothyroxine, don't take in the 24 hours prior to test, delay and take straight after. This gives highest TSH, lowest FT4 and most consistent results. (Patient to patient tip, GP will be unaware)

Hi, I'm not new to thyroid issues, but am very new to this site and the electrifying effect it has had on taking control of my condition.

I have had ringing ears (tinnitus) and hearing problems (like being in a plane) for 10 years without any medical professionals (and there have been many) connecting this to hypothyroid condition.

I recently thanks to the advice received here, took action that has vastly improved my hearing...no more hearing aids. I was under medicated, and also eating soya, and taking other medication that was blocking T4... So all I can say is that you should get your tests done and inform yourself. My crap gp turned into a useful ally once I went to see him armed with research and knowledge... And demands!

I never realised how connected hearing, tinnitus and vertigo can be commonly related symptoms of hypothyroid, so if you are suffering from this, you can do something about it.

Good luck 👍

jgelliss profile image
jgelliss in reply to FIT2018

FIT2018

Welcome . What Great Info your sharing . It's an all Win Win situations learning and exchanging great info with one another .

We are Not Alone !!!! Thank You !!!

Hiya

I could have written this post myself I’m exactly the same!!!! Diagnosed 2016. Then went into menopause shortly afterwards. So suffered with hot flushes night and day. Then came the anxiety and panic. Also developed acid reflux so lost 2 stone in weight. Also had double vision for 9 days and now have very dry eyes. I am fatigued, have tinnitus, and still get panic feelings. Mornings are especially bad. What has helped me is CBT, yoga, walking and a good circle of friends.

I’m on 50mcg Levo and recent bloods are normal limits. You don’t say your age could it be perimenopause?

Get help now and nip in bud, see your GP

Also do get vit D checked mine was slightly low. Also check ferritin and B12. Ask your GP to check you for other deficiencies.

Hope you get better soon

What is your sugar intake like, have you had you blood sugars checked.

Do you over exercise for someone that has hypothyroid disease/Hashimotos.

Where are you when you have these symptoms and are they before after exercise ect. Apart from your thyroid issues do you have any other health concerns or issues that are underlying that you may need to see your GP about.

If you can identify a pattern or routine which results in these unwanted side effects or are they constant. If you exercise do you have your full six count yoga breathe in place, are you remembering to breathe as sometimes during an anxiety attack some hold their breathe which may then result in racing heart as you stare your body of oxygen. Do you smoke or are you an x smoker as there are over two hundred chemicals in fags which can also make your heart race. Are you hydrated, when the weather gets warmer you need to increase fluid intake. I need to drink two litres of clean drinking every day with my thyroid that's without doing any exercise. I did well and reduced some of the symptoms you described above by thinking about my sugar and caffeine intake. Sometimes when I felt shaky I would have a little nibble on a snack and usually felt better fairly quickly. My racy heart is usually ok as long as I only drink decafe and I don't use any cane granulated sugar in my drinks but put honey instead which seems to have gotten rid of the unwanted side effects. I used to exercise most days and now my daily housework routine is all I can manage if I want to stay clean of that brain fog and extreme exhaustion. What type of yoga do you practise as ashtanga can be very energy demanding, exhausting and I wouldn't even attempt this type of yoga with thyroid disease. Slow restorative yoga is my limit and even then I can feel light headed if I move from one position to another to quickly. Ive seen non thyroid yoggies pass out almost during a session and feel like your describing. Anyway hope this is helpful, Good luck.

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