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Anti-thyroid antibodies, parietal cell antibodies and tissue transglutaminase antibodies in patients with autoimmune thyroid disease

Couldn't agree more with the conclusion here. Have to say, it is plain crazy that this isn't already standard practice.

Arch Med Sci. 2018 Apr;14(3):516-520. doi: 10.5114/aoms.2016.58743. Epub 2016 Mar 23.

Anti-thyroid antibodies, parietal cell antibodies and tissue transglutaminase antibodies in patients with autoimmune thyroid disease.

Twito O1, Shapiro Y2, Golan-Cohen A3,4, Dickstein Y3, Ness-Abramof R5, Shapiro M3.

Author information

1 Meir Medical Center, Kefar-Sava, Israel.

2 Maccabi Health Services, Israel.

3 Leumit Health Fund, Israel.

4 Department of Family Medicine, Tel-Aviv University, Tel-Aviv, Israel.

5 Clalit Health Services, Israel.

Abstract

Introduction:

The co-existence of tissue-specific autoantibodies in autoimmune thyroid disease (ATD) is well established. The published prevalence of anti-parietal cell antibodies (PC-Ab) is 20-25%, and that of celiac antibodies is 2-5%. The goal of this study was to determine the prevalence of PC-Ab and anti-tissue transglutaminase antibodies (tTG-Ab) in patients with ATD and to evaluate the correlation between anti-thyroid antibodies and the other antibodies.

Material and methods:

The files of 120 Israeli Jews and Arabs with ATD were evaluated for anti-thyroglobulin antibodies (Tg-Ab), anti-thyroid peroxidase antibodies (TPO-Ab), PC-Ab and tTG-Ab. For patients with positive PC-Ab and/or tTG-Ab, upper gastrointestinal (GI) endoscopy results were recorded. Gastrin levels were collected in patients with positive PC-Ab.

Results:

Twelve (10%) males and 108 (90%) females were evaluated, of whom 93.33% had Hashimoto's thyroiditis. Thirty-four (28.3%) subjects had positive PC-Ab. This rate was not affected by gender, ethnicity or thyroid disease. Abnormal gastroscopy findings were documented in 95.2% of the upper GI endoscopies. The mean gastrin level in this subgroup was 660.4 pg/ml. Five of 114 tTG-Ab tests were positive (4.4%). All were females with Hashimoto's thyroiditis. Rates were equal among Jews and Arabs. Higher TPO-Ab levels were associated with higher risk for PC-Ab positivity (p = 0.027), but not tTG-positivity. Higher Tg-Ab levels were not associated with higher levels of other antibodies.

Conclusions:

Considering the frequency of PC-Ab and tTG-Ab positivity in ATD, checking for the presence of these two entities should be an integral part of the workup of this disease.

KEYWORDS:

anti-thyroid antibodies; autoimmune thyroid disease; celiac disease; parietal cell antibodies

PMID: 29765436

PMCID: PMC5949896

DOI: 10.5114/aoms.2016.58743

ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/297...

17 Replies
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Seems to strengthen the argument about autoimmune diseases "hunting in packs". Yes, I agree with the conclusion but will I still be around when it becomes normal practice? lol

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Methuselah is reported to have lived to the age of 969 - so why not? :-)

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Thanks for adding the ncbi.nlm.nih link. More info for my 'thyroid notebook.' Sometimes, not always, when I show documentation to docs to support what I'm asking for, there is a snobbishness here (US) about info that doesn't have a US 'imprimatur' on it. Abstracts and info from the NIH (National Institutes of Health) tend to carry more weight. Unfortunate!

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Yes, will the new NICE thyroid guidelines include this recommendation?

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It would be good if they do. The seemingly constant need for patients to ask is ridiculous - and they only do that after reading around and seeing that there are reasons to do them.

We also need these tests to be reported consistently - using standardised units, and consistent ranges. With sensible interpretation of results that are not absolutely obvious.

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When you consider the cost of the poor health and doctor visits caused by these you would have thought it was in the NHS' interest to treat at an early stage, not just ignore.

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Penny-wise and pound foolish!

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Just out of curiosity is hypothyroidism more common in certain ethnic groups, like diabetes? I've noticed that Israeli researchers regularly author Thyroid papers- is that just coincidence?

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I simply do not know.

The paper itself says no difference between Jews and Arabs - but how much genetic difference is there anyway?

We do see a preponderance of papers from some countries - more recently many from China, Korea, Brazil, Italy, UK, USA, etc. A disproportionately low number from Russia, though I'd put that down to how they are published.

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Could it have something to do with 'civilized, first world countries' (whatever that really means) having access to more profitable, but not necessarily more healthful, food production methods? Just a thought.

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There is quite a bit of evidence that some substances - like bisphenol-A - could be important factors. Difficult to know about their distribution in relation to first, second or third world countries.

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I’ve had raised antibodies indicating coeliac this was 30 years ago, they wanted to take samples of my bowel back then but being young and scared I didn’t have it done, I was always unwell and fatigued for years, I have been gluten/dairy free for the last 3 years, But I’ve been very unwell due to hidden gluten in condiments, I now have a app on my phone to scan everything, since doing this, I now feel normal and have energy that I’ve never had before, I also have B12 injections too which I needed every week, I now feel I don’t need it so much now, and it’s nice to wake up and get out of bed without the fatigue that’s plagued me all my life, my dr will not test me again and says I need to be eating it again, but I’m not going to do that, as I’ve been so unwell, it felt like I was slowly dieing every day with the nausea fatigue, tummy issues, all because of gluten and dairy. I would say I must of had this way before my Hashi thyroiditis .

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Could I ask what app you use, any new tool in the arsenal to avoid gluten would be great. Getting rid of it is like herding cats blindfolded - Cheers.

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Hi pandv, the app is called Spoon Guru, it has recipes on there too, and you can select other intolerances too.

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Thanks for that, appreciated. Just beeping my way through the cupboards now, looks to have a good database. Paul

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Yes that’s what I did, Tesco own brands are not on there yet, but all branded are.

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I am so glad to hear that you have found a way to 'manage' your stomach issues. I am much the same as you in terms of struggling, always feeling unwell etc. etc. and since giving up gluten and milk I have felt much better but as you say, keep getting glutened by hidden stuff. Am looking forward to trying that app - sounds like a great tool. Thanks

Andrea

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