Thyroid UK
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Newly diagnosed feeling anxious

Hi everyone, I'm newly diagnosed and feel a bit anxious about it all if I'm honest. I have been reading as much info as possible to try and understand the condition. I have been started on 25 mg and have to have a blood test in 6 weeks. Is it true I can't eat greens, yogurts and anything else that is rich in calcium? Also has anyone else had symptoms of feeling off balance and forgetting just about everything, having to over think day to day activitys so I don't forget to do them. I seem to have lost my appetite since i've been diagnosed but I'm assuming that's me worrying. Also will I start to loose the weight now I'm having treatment, as I go to the gym 5 days a week and just don't seem to be seeing any results. Sorry for all the questions

Thank you

Jenny 😀

12 Replies
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Sorry I don't feel qualified to offer advice but I felt much like you when I was first diagnosed. Things will improve but will take time. More experienced folk will give you good advice on this forum soon. Be sure to follow it as it has been my saving grace! Oh and do be sure to post all your results for them to comment on.

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Thank you very much for your reply. I'm sure things will improve I think I'm just feeling a bit sorry for myself 😐 I'm not sure what my results are, can I ask the doctor for them.?

Thank again

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Yes it is your legal right.

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I’m new to the website but have had the problem for years. You can ask your dr for a copy of your results and put on here. There’s lots of great advice from folk who have been through it already. Good luck

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Thank you I will get my results and put them on when I get them. I'm so glad I came across the site I don't feel as alone now. Thank you 😊

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Ok thank you I will ask on Monday.

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Regarding calcium, in addition to supporting bone health, adequate calcium also helps to regulate our acid/alkaline balance and support muscle and nerve function. Proper thyroid function helps to regulate blood calcium levels whilst hypothyroidism can inhibit calcium metabolism (one of the hormones produced in the thyroid is Calcitonin, which helps to regulate levels of calcium and phosphate in the blood, opposing the action of parathyroid hormone. When you are provided with only levothyroxine you are replacing only T4 and not the full range of hormones ie T1,2,3,4 & Calcitonin). So rather than not eating calcium-rich foods, they are an important part of a nutritionally-rich diet. You may be confused with keeping calcium supplements separate from your thyroid tablets, which is true, but you should separate all food and drink (ex water) from your Levo - the PIL leaflet says wait 30 minutes after your Levo before consuming both, but generally its advised to wait an hour; and to wait two hours after eating to take your Levo. Additionally, you should keep 4 hrs between iron supplementation and your thyroid meds. Regarding green/cruciferous vegetables aka goitrogens, there's a lot of outdated advice given about them. Firstly, they are far too valuable a resource to be omitted from our diet. Cruciferous vegetables like broccoli, cabbage, and kale are known for their anti-cancer and antioxidant properties. Root vegetables like sweet potatoes, turnips, and rutabaga provide a rich source of complex carbohydrate, which can be difficult to obtain on a grain-free diet. Cruciferous vegetables as well as sweet potatoes and strawberries contain carotenoids, which are precursors to vitamin A. In addition, a lot of the fruits and vegetables on the goitrogen list are a good source of the B vitamins, vitamin C, vitamin K, calcium, magnesium, potassium, zinc and sulfur. By avoiding these foods, you may be setting yourself up for nutritional deficiencies.

It's now understood that consuming these foods in moderate quantities actually supports thyroid function - with the exception of SOY, which SHOULD be avoided except in the fermented form ie miso, tempeh or natto.

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Thank you so much for your reply it is so helpful i really appriciate you taking the time to provide me with such detail. I will read it again in the morning when im.not so tired and can understand more. Thanks again

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Hi Jenny , I too have recently been diagnosed too and like you am finding it hard to take in how my body is changing, like you I used to go the gym every morning for 5 days a week, now reduced to just walking the dog once or twice a day by my doctor who is worried about my fluctuating blood pressure!!

I’m gagging to go back to the gym and loose the weight that Hypothiroid has made me put on!

Can anyone else advise on is it safe to go training or will it hinder my condition??

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Thank you for your reply, its reassuring to know it not me just me thats finding it difficult to take. I hate having a cold and rarely get sick so its a bit of a shock. Has ypur doctor told you to stop going to the gym because of your hypothiroid or due to your blood pressure? My doctor knows im going to the gym and didnt advice not to. Thanks again for taking the time to reply 😀

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He said it’s to do with my blood pressure which if so makes it a viscous circle, because if I loose weight in theory my blood pressure would come down, and i read if you are fitter and exercising then the pituary gland sends messages to the thyroid to produce all the hormones the body needs !!

Or maybe I’ve read that wrong? Maybe someone in the group who’s more qualified or experienced can clarify this?

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That does make sence as i havent had all the symptoms that somenof the poor guys have on here so lucky really. I hope you get to the bottom of it and your blood preasure sorts it self out and you can go back to the gym. Im sure i would feel a lot worse without going 😀

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