Virtual (telephone) Endo consultation

I had an endo consultation Monday and dose has been slightly reduced so I have to have another TFT in 6 weeks and repeat vitD and calcium profile the lab 'forgot' to analyse or report.

Results will be discussed during a 'virtual consultation' by telephone. I've had a letter arranging a date and time for a telephone consultation with one of the two endos. Not to worry if I miss the call as a letter confirming results etc. will be sent to me. I'm very happy with this as it spares me a 3 hour round trip plus waiting time.

My next in-person endo consult is May 2016.

11 Replies

  • Good idea to have telephone appointments. Saves time and money all round, especially in the Hospital Carpark, plus time finding a space.

  • J_bee, I no longer drive so I have the delights of 3 buses and a tube journey each way.

  • Think I am getting close to giving up driving an don't know how I would get to Hospital, so this sounds like a good idea.

  • Skype would be good!

  • Treepie, Nah, I'd have to comb my hair and apply lipstick for Skype ;)

  • But you can look him/her in the eye and gauge the veracity of the words.

  • Treepie, doctors are trained to look you in the eye when they lie, I mean when they tell you results are 'normal'.

  • That certainly makes life easier Clutter, less expensive too.

  • My last GP "appointment" was by phone. I have distinctly mixed feelings.

    On the plus side, I got on with work until the phone rang. Then had the discussion - so all the travel, parking, time away from work, etc. was no longer a problem. Not sitting waiting on an uncomfortable chair with lots of ill people was another big advantage.

    Minuses included having to take the call in a sudden leap from thinking about work. So not as prepared as I might been when. And taking the call with the possibility of other calls coming in and all the usual disturbances of noise, and other things happening, that had the potential to reduce the quality dramatically.

    The process removes a lot of the human interactions - eye contact, GP assessing how I walk in and sit down, me feeling that I got to know the doctor a little, etc.

    In the end, I achieved what I wanted - refusal to take aspirin agreed and (seemingly) understood and accepted by GP, and prescription for beta blocker accepted but unlikely to be fulfilled (my choice)! It wouldn't have had to be very different for the whole thing to have not had a satisfactory conclusion.

    However, I absolutely think that phone calls can be a very effective approach. Especially, for example, when all you want is to get your test results!

    I almost always feel that these consultations, face-to-face and especially phone-based, desperately need something that pretty much never happens: A follow-up in writing. Even a couple of lines as an email. Something which said "Discussed aspirin - agreed that on balance would not take them. Beta-blocker prescription issued. Discussed interaction with thyroid."

  • Helvella I can totally identify with all that you have said about phone consultations. I too prefer to look them in the eye. As for the old fashioned way of doctoring, looking at the patient, how they look, checking their pulse etc, well I don't think they teach that any more.

    I was on the back of a bus when I had my consultation, fortunately only needed to discuss bloods and I had a note with me as a prompt and with printout blood results, otherwise it would have been a waste of time. It is very easy to be distracted.

    As you say a follow up note or email would be good. He was impressed with reduction in TPO from 120 to 13 over the last year due to going gluten and lacto free!

  • Rod, This is just to discuss results. I have been wondering why GP meds reviews aren't done via telephone but your comment about lack of human interaction and assessing patient as s/he walks in answers that.

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