Head protection for falls? : Hi everyone... - PSP Association

PSP Association

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Head protection for falls?

Hdee
Hdee

Hi everyone,

Mum has had a nasty fall over night, she had got up to check that the lights were out in the corridor (she just can’t seem to stay put!) and fell gashing her head open, the paramedics came and gave her 5 stitches. He said she was lucky. Mum wasn’t phased by it at all, she said it didn’t hurt, I’m really wondering about pain perception and

PSP. My question is whether anyone has used any form of head protection and if you have had success with it? I’ve seen online head protection for falls which looks a bit like a boxer’s head gear! Mum is averaging about a fall a week and I’m so worried, but she is impulsive and finds it hard to remember to wait for help.

Any ideas for thoughts on the head gear would be great, thank you.

Helen x

14 Replies
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The head gear protection is helpful. I have a patient at work that is using one. It soft but not to soft. The material is like hard foam or soft plastic. I don’t know how does it makes ur mom feel. It looks uncomfortable because of the straps. Now the question is if your mom is going to wear? My husband used to fall down like 2-3 times a week and get up 3-4 time a night but it’s been 9 months without a fall and he sleeps throughout the night till 5:00 for bathroom then go back to sleep till 9:30. I got him to a routine each night before bedtime. Hang in there, it’s not easy. I hope ur mom find a way to lessen her fall and be protective when it happens. Hope is well for both of you. 🙏🏽

Hello there

My husband went through a period of heavy falls which invariably led him to being stitched or glued back together. He always landed on his left side so it was usually the left hand side of his head and face that was affected.

He used to take Clonazepam at night and wore a Conveen which stopped him getting up at night. But it was the ones where he thought he could do things he no longer could which were the most devastating. I don't think he would have accepted head protection but he did accept having rails on his hospital bed and being wheeled around rather than walking on a walker, which reduced the risks.

Hope this helps, keep on keeping on.

Anne

Goroos
Goroos in reply to AnneandChris

Hi Anne

Could you tell me what you thoughts of Clonazepam are. My mum has it given to her sometimes in the morning and sometimes in the afternoon. It has a sedating affect on her, and we worry about her swallowing when she is sedated.

AnneandChris
AnneandChris in reply to Goroos

Chris used to take it at night with no adverse effects. Towards the end he produced volumes of saliver but with sea sickness patches this was controllable.

I think the art is to spot when there are or have been changes and working with your GP/District Nurse to manage these. I'm assuming you are in the UK. But if not then support may vary.

Keep on keeping on, you're doing a wonderful job.

Hugs x

I once tried a rugby cap for Steve, you know, the ones with holes in them. Yes, you have guessed correctly, he fell and found the sharpest rock in the garden and lined it up nicely with a hole in the cap. I gave up after that and accepted the inevitable cuts and bruises.

As to pain, Steve could never discribe that he was in pain, although at times it was very obvious, one doctor once asked him, on the scale of one to ten, how bad was the pain, he replied 12. Before that, he was denying he was in pain, although his wrist was broken.

This is a very hard part of PSP, unfortunately it does wane as the disease progresses.

Sending big hug and much love

Lots of love

Anne

daddyt
daddyt in reply to Heady

Hi Anne - I recently fell and broke my left wrist. It was a better choice than doing a face plant. I can't sat it's not painful, having a higher threshold for pain but how much I can't say for sure.

Tim x

AnneandChris
AnneandChris in reply to daddyt

Oh Tim, keep safe. Life is so unpredictable with PSP.

Hugs

Anne

Heady
Heady in reply to daddyt

I hope you are left handed. Steve broke his right wrist and being very right handed struggled, because his left hand was starting to curl in. He very quickly had to learn to use this hand and I am convinced that this useage stopped him having the curled hands that sometimes comes with PSP. I know life is not easy for you, this must be a real blow for you.

Sending big hug and much love

Lots of love

Anne

daddyt
daddyt in reply to Heady

I'm ambidextrous... it will make things more challenging, but I'll find a around it.

Tim x

Heady
Heady in reply to daddyt

Know you love a challange Tim!!!!!!

I have also wondered if with PSP you don't feel pain?? My husband had numerous falls and has burnt himself and didn't seem to react ? which always made me wonder? He has been in care for 17 months now but still is very unpredictable & impulsive. He does not speak anymore & with social distancing &@ half hour visit a week it's sheer torture & so frustrating not being able to touch him or give him a hug ?? Take care & hang in there!! My husband is 70 in Nov & don't even know if we can have anything for him??? Regards Phil

Hi Hdee!

I agree with all the answers posted by the carers.

About head-protection, I bought one for my sister. A ciclist one, she denied to wear it.

Now she lives in a wheelchair and tied to the chair.

She is now in a home care. While she was in her own home we couldn't convince her to accept to be tied to a chair.

It's very hard to accept but home care are a little like a prison.

So sorry your mum has reached this stage of the disease. The next fall she could broke a hip. Then the problem is worth.

Try to convince your mum to decide between the two options. Being taied or having a head protection.

Best wishes, good luck and a lot of love.

Elena

Mom fell often but we never thought of getting her a helmet. I doubt she would have worn because it would mess up her hairdo. Sending hugs of encouragement... Granni B

I had a recent fall backwards as always with a two inch laceration to back of scalp. I thought I would be alright as I was wearing some padded shorts that by the way I think are helpful in protecting hips and buttocks. After last head crack when the edge of a jointer caught my fall before I hit floor I was thinking about head protection as well. I’m not sure I would have it on when I fall as it isn’t always predictable but I was thinking a hockey helmet might help as it covers head well and has a reasonable chin strap that isn’t too tight.. I haven’t bought one yet but may look for one. In meantime I try to avoid even one step backward without hanging on to something as it will often lead to a fall.

Best of luck Hdee!

It is a tough disease to live with

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