Limit fucking for 6 months of anyone who's had I-125 seeds

I'm amazed that anyone as prestigious as Memorial Sloan Kettering investigated this. They used an ultrasound probe up the butt of 20 men implanted with I-125 seeds, and 82 men implanted with Pd-103 seeds at the day of implantation and also 60 days later. The dose received by the probe (i.e., the top's penis) was not high enough that they recommend complete abstinence, but they do recommend limiting fucking for 6 months if I-125 seeds were implanted and for 2 months if Pd-103 seeds were implanted. Here's a link to their study: brachyjournal.com/article/S...

They don't mention the bottom's POV, but if it feels painful (in a bad way), stop. Those tissues are apt to be raw for quite a while after implantation, and you want to give them some time to heal. I asked my RO if there is a danger of driving seeds into the urethra, and he didn't think so, but no one has studied that. No one has tracked the effect on seed migration. I'd certainly want to wait for the inflammation to go down and scar tissue to set the seeds in place, which would be at least 2 weeks for Pd-103 seeds and a month for 1-125 seeds.

- Allen

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  • Regarding the above, if it is safer to get radiation treatment for PCa than to live with the cancer, and, in other words, radiation is relatively safe for treating cancer, then how is it so dangerous for small children and animals to sit on someone's lap with brachytherapy?

    Would it not be likewise dangerous for the person who is getting the seeds implanted?

    Just things that make you go hmmm.

    Mark

  • Mark,

    Exposure to radiation can be curative, if warranted, but it is not something we'd do if not warranted. There absolutely are toxic effects to healthy tissues, which is why those of us who undergo radiation therapy sometimes experience irritative urinary, rectal and sexual side effects. We'd no more unnecessarily expose someone to radiation than we'd unnecessarily remove a prostate.

    Whether one decides to treat the cancer (with any therapy) or not treat the cancer depends on the patient's own assessment of risks and benefits. Most of us would agree that the balance of risks and benefits favors treatment for unfavorable risk PC, but active surveillance may be a better choice if the cancer is still at a favorable risk stage.

  • Hi "Tall-Allen"

    MSKCC has been receptive to Malecare's entreaties to be more GBT aware around prostate cancer. It's taken years and they have been slow to ramp up, but, as you see, they are arriving. It helps a lot that I and Malecare are based in NYC and see their folks at various events.

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