Anyone have dupuytrens contracture of the hand? or relatives affected?

Dupuytren's contracture, also called Dupuytren's disease, is a progressive thickening and tightening of the connective tissue in the palm. As it progresses, nodules form and become cords, which eventually pull the fingers into a bent position. Sometimes small callouse looking pads are visible on the knucles. I remember my dad having them!

It is apparently more common in northern european males over 50. There are four instances on my dad's side of the family (originally from North East England UK.) My father and his older brother had it and surgery to remove nodules and release bands. I also have two female cousins 60yrs plus who have this . I am wondering if there is a genetic connection somewhere between - PBC - Dupuytrens - NE England/Scandinavia etc. Also as a matter of interest i have two female cousins late 50's and 60's one of whom has Reynauds and the other recently diagnosed with Rheumatoid Arthritis

By the way, I have read of a connection between alcoholic cirrhosis and dupuytrens. I wondered if there is a connection with any kind of cirrhosis and dupuytrens. (pronounced du-pwe-tranz)

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  • Good discription of Dupuytrens Contracture.

    My husband and brother both of northern european descent and over 50 have this. Neither have PBC or cirrhosis, that we know of. My husband needs the surgery, on one hand, as his fingers are curling towards the palm and he can't straighten them out. Hard to use the keyboard! Once my brother can no longer hold his golf club, he says he'll have the surgery. This is an uncommon disease and yet two unrelated males in my family have it. Very strange!

    If you don't mind my asking, were the surgeries for this condition successful? Thanks for the post, my husband read it too.

    Take care....

  • Hi there. My dad and uncle both had surgery. It scars the hand quite a bit. Required physio and using a hand splint for part of the recovery time. Prior to the op which dad had done through the public health system (NZ) when it got "bad" enough, he was unable to flatten his palm to save himself if he needed to break a fall. Was much better after op.

    Interestingly while looking this up yesterday i found a less invasive treament in USA called N.A. needle aponevrotomy and supposed to have very good instant results without surgery. Worth checking out i think.

  • answer three years late ...sorry, yes they had to do physio etc but seemed happy with results , quite a lot of scarring to palm of hand though.

  • my husband has this, we live in Scotland, hes 44 (through has had it for a few years now, I think he was 40), no PBC or cirrhosis.

  • hi catherine69, check out my comment above re needle aponevrotomy.

  • I had an operation in jan 2011 to have a nodule removed from the palm of my left hand. Before the op my fingers were ok and not showing any signs of bending inwards. I had to do 11mths of physio on it but ever since, 2 of my fingers have not straightened out properly and find i still get pain in them. I had an x-ray done on my hands last month and will get the results on 12th june when i go to see my rhuematologist. just over a week ago i found another nodule on the palm of my right hand. Ive never heard of dupuytrens contracture. I only had the op done because the specialist showed me pictures of what could happen if the fingers turn inwards. Think i will speak to the rheumatologist again about this problem.

  • hi hazeleyes , check out my comment above re needle aponevrotomy :)

  • Hi there. I have Dupuytren's disease. And I'm from Scotland. I'm in my 50's but was diagnosed in my 40's got it in my left hand. But seem's to be ok the now. I also have a blood disorder, Fatty liver also having test's done to see if I have Rheumatoid or Osteoarthritis.

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