Obesity and Cancer: Hi lovely ladies. I saw on TV... - My Ovacome

My Ovacome
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Obesity and Cancer

Hi lovely ladies. I saw on TV this morning that more cancers are due to obesity than cigarettes. Ovarian cancer was one of the ones mentioned. I'm wondering now, how many of you would say you are/were obese? It's just a personal curiosity.

Best wishes to everyone, Zena xx

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Hello Zena - I have never understood the coloration between being over weight and increasing your risk of cancer? My BMI at diagnosis was 25 so no not obese. Personally I don't think cancer cares weather you are a size 8 or 28.

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I agree with you Lyn. Thanks for answering. xx

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Hi Zena I would say I was/am. I was 14-16 when diagnosed but then again I have the BRAC2 gene so how does that figure in their findings? I agree with Lyn to be honest. My older brother is a stick insect (literally), not an ounce on him and yet he has prostrate cancer. I'm so not convinced by this article.xx

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I think you're right. I'm BRCA2 as well and size 10/12. It seems they find something new to say everyday and then contradict themselves further down the line. Experts are they really? xx

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Hi zena,i have all ways been on the big size 18/ 20 and i was 76 when i was told i got ovc, never smoked very rarely had a drink,take care x

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Thanks for answering Shortie. I don't smoke but I do like a drink. My father smoked for over 80 years and didn't get lung cancer. I think it's all pot luck. xx

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I was ok. BMI of about 23. I’m BRCA though so think that’s more relevant to me. I struggle with my weight now after the enforced instant menopause so am now overweight.

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Thanks for answering. I agree about the BRCA. I wonder if they took that into account? xx

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There is a correlation between obesity and cancer but that’s not the same as causatipn - in case of oestrogen dependent cancers such as some types of breast and gynae cancers the link is more secure as fat tissue produces oestrogen so particularity in post menopausal women being overweight can be an issue - similarity obesity linked to insulin resistance and this appears to play role in womb cancer as other causes such as diabetes and polycystic ovaries which both involve insulin resistance also linked to it.

I was overweight ( still am) though I’d lost 4 st as diagnosed as diabetic few years before diagnosis .

Personally I find the campaigns guilt inducing which doesn’t help anyone - and actually despite being fat my womb primary and ovarian primary weren’t oestrogen dependent - cancer research U.K. have said the campaign is aimed at getting government to be more active in finding ways to solve obesity issue but putting it out as fake cigarette packet adverts is aimed at individuals not agencies - obesity is s multi factorial issue not a case of no willpower or greed and this campaign ignores this in favour of a simplistic fat shaming headline - I overate because my son had a breakdown and it was my way of coping when there was no support from mental health services for him or for me - I’d also had years of own mental health issues that I’d get made to feel guilty about as the current cheap support model of CBT hadn’t helped at all - until we recognise that obesity can be a symptom of other heart issues, campaigns such as this one won’t achieve anything other than once again shifting a societal issue onto vulnerable individuals !

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You've got some good points there. In fact I have lots of friends that consider themselves overweight (although these days we all get accused of being overweight) and none of them have any problems in the gyny department. It looks like more fat shaming which I didn't even think of.

I hope your son it feeling better now. My son is the same. It's a dreadful experience for the whole family. xx

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Hi

Have mixed feelings about them including Ovarian Cancer in this campaign. Just seen an interview where they estimated obesity causes 460 more cases of ovarian cancer than smoking. Do they really know that this was the cause and not a coincidence ? Haven’t seen the primary research so hard to unpick the headlines.

Those diagnosed with cancer have enough mental issues to deal with, without adding to them. I’m all for healthy eating education and people being responsible for their health but don’t agree with adding to the guilt we already have when diagnosed with cancer. Our mental health services are already in crisis!

I’ve never been obese, never smoked, not BRACA. Had 2 children who were breast fed, Had an early menopause-All meant to reduce my risk. Weight was starting to creep up as I hit 50 so went to WW and lost a stone.

Still got OC cancer !

More lives could be saved in terms of OC by spending the money on developing screening, improving gynea services for women and awareness campaign to GPs and getting women earlier diagnosis. Rather than trying to imply we are responsible for getting cancer due to our weight.

My mum looked obese for a number of years and we encouraged her to loose weight. Turned out she had undiagnosed congestive heart failure ( not picked up by GP !) After a stay in hospital and now on heavy duty diuretics she lost 5 stone in fluid.

Now got that off my chest off to enjoy my coffee and cake 🍰 😀

Love to all

Kim x 💜

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I agree- also they included OC as a’common’ cancer but we have always been told that GPS only see one case every 3 years or something- they can’t have it both ways!

I wasn’t obese at diagnosis but I was BRCA 1- which no one had identified despite my saying to GP that I was worried about it!

Not sure this report adds much xx

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Thanks Lyndy it's interesting reading everyone's replies. I hope no one thinks I am trying to fat shame. I didn't think of that when I asked the question. I believe in live and let live. xx

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Just looked at the statistics published by the World Cancer Research Fund for 2018. It ranks Ovarian Cancer the 18th most common cancer globally out of a total of 34 types of cancer. Not that common then and more lazy reporting in this campaign. Has anyone bothered to fact check these statements before they were published?

Juliax

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Who knows Julia? xx

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So much for ovarian cancer being common, my gp at a very busy practice said I was the first case he had seen and he is due to retire In A couple of years 😆

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My doctor didn't spot mine so goodness knows how many cases he's seen and didn't know it. He's a nice bloke but couldn't spot a pimple on the end of your nose.

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Bless theses doctors 🥴, I was sent for an u,trasound first as they thought I had an umbilical hernia ( it turns out I did) but I also had 4 tumours 🤣😂. This was only found after blood tests showed a very high tumour marker so went for scan and ta dah x

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Funny you should talk about cake I'm just eating a slice myself, Kim. I completely agree with everything you've said there. It looks more and more like it doesn't matter what you do if you're going to get cancer you're going to get it. None of it's fair just like everything else in life.

Enjoy your cake. I think I'll have a little drink with mine. xxx

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Spot on, I would also like to see the money spent on research for screening tests.

As I drove home tonight I saw at least 8 of these ads in a 10 minute stretch of road. I find them too one dimensional, we all know it’s not good to be over weight but if it were that easy too lose weight everyone would be slim.

I was not over weight at diagnosis to answer the original question. I’m BCR neg and estrogen driven HGS. X

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Thanks for the reply Lias, it's been interesting reading all the replies. xx

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Well said - ignore typos in my post please - phone ‘s predictive text had taken over - being overweight isn’t good for you all round but the money would be better spent helping people improve diet and well being rather than being another stick to beat themselves with - perhaps the fat shaming cancer campaigns and anti smoking cancer campaigns could target healthcare professionals first if they are determined to shame people as walking through a cloud of smoke from nurses as I came out of my recent hospital visit probably doesn’t do much for my or their health along with fact that many including doctors are overweight.

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You're not wrong there. xx

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Yes I was and am still overweight. Obesity is the new baddie on the block. It really used to be smoking. That is still bad but has now been medicalised. That is “poor you / you have an addiction but we have ways of helping”

Being overweight does not get the same sympathy- not saying it should- but it is seen as more the persons fault. Smoking used to be seen in the same vein.

They rarely quote the studies and to what degree the statistics say it is more likely than not. Having done some research for a friend on experts testimony in court. They were using old studies - some of which were only on 9 people!

So much for experts. I would like to see the studies and details.

So in conclusion for me- maybe maybe not. I cannot alter it now for me but we need good information for others in the future.

Fay

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Thanks Fay, I don't believe it made any difference. The more I'm reading the answers we have thin, bigger, younger, older, BRCA, non BRCA, healthy and not so much. It's not worth the worry now but let's hope they can get it right for once and help women in the future. xx

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Hi I was not overweight when I was diagnosed, in fact I was obsessive about what I did and didn’t eat and counted calories and weighed myself on a daily basis. Still got OC!! Maybe the worry of keeping my weight down was the cause of it?! I did used to smoke but haven’t done for over 20 years. I agree we all have enough to worry about without a report like that being thrown out there for what is more than likely ulterior motives?!

Claire xx

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Thanks for replying Claire. You could be right there about the stress and worry. It looks so random. I wonder how many women they asked and with all the different diets over the world it must be difficult to find the real answer. Just more 'fake news' perhaps. xxx

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I was size 8-10 at diagnosis and was fairly fit and healthy (ran half marathons etc) also had breast fed 3 children for significant amount of time!

Since all the surgery and treatments, chemo, steroids etc plus getting DVT secondary to anaemia my fitness levels are rubbish I’m still on treatment and have anaemia so can’t see them improving for a while so I am now up to a size 16!! This is not me and I’m starting slimming world to try and lose some weight! I too saw the report on the news and felt annoyed as it’s not useful to blame people’s lifestyles on their cancer diagnosis! My prof has told me it’s a matter of luck of the draw! With 1 in 2 people now getting cancer are they going to start saying it’s because we breathe we get cancer??

Really annoys me no one should be made to feel it’s their fault how dare they!!

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I agree with you Bee. Thanks for answering. Size 16 isn't so big though. I put weight on due to steroids but have managed to get back to what is my normal.I'll never get back to my original weight of 6lb 8oz. Ha HA. I think we all gain weight as we get older anyway.

It's been really interesting reading everyones replies.

Good luck with slimming world. Best wishes, xx

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Hello Zena, I've never been obese or overweight. I did smoke but not for the last 30 years.

I don't put much credence on this type of report. So they are linking/attributing one in 15 new cases of our fairly rare cancer to obesity. The story is the increase in obesity not the link to ovarian cancer. Being obese is undesirable for lots of reasons but I imagine this kind of "information" does more to induce guilt - and hence unhealthy behaviours - than it does to reduce obesity or prevent cancer. And it's certainly not helpful to any of us to be told that our lifestyles are to blame!

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You're right Gill. None of us are to blame. I wish they'd wait until they get the full picture before they start blaming us for our own cancer. They could put the money to better use. We've only just found out about BRCA who knows what else there might be.

Best wishes,

Zena xx

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Hi Zena,

I was told my oc was down to bad luck. Something that wasn’t being used, just going down the bad route.

I watch what I eat, gave up smoking over 30 years ago, what more can we do?

Who wants to live forever? (To quote Freddie Mercury) none of us can, we just need to be the best we can be and try to not stress.

There are loads of lovely ladies not here to share time with us and others that we don’t hear from and I know we miss them all.

I am more and more of the opinion that what will be, will be and live for the moment.

Love to you xx

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I completely agree and if you've read any of my, not too many, posts you'll see I live for the moment without a doubt. In fact I can't find enough moments to do all the things I'm trying to do. I miss so many that I used to talk to on here but sadly there's many more that have joined us.

Best wishes to you, Love Zena xx

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I was a bit overweight at diagnosis but now resemble a large whale. Inactivity during treatments and comfort eating have taken their toll! I reckon my CA was genetic (BRIP1 ) so I'm not sure how relevanr the weight is. My mother who died of OC in 1980 was under weight if anything.

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Just show Rachael, weight probably has little to do with it. xx

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Hi Zenaj - I wasn't overweight back in 2011 when I was first diagnosed, but I sure as hell am now! Best advice I had at the beginning from my oncology nurse was - don't go trawling through the internet! I think that as far as ovarian cancer goes - and I can't 'speak' about any other kind of cancer - it appears to be hugely diverse both in its manifestations and in the reactions of those it affects. I think there can be a link between greatly reduced energy levels, as when one is undergoing treatment and also recovering from treatment, and weight gain. Also I'm finding it a challenge now to sort out whether my reduced energy level is because of treatment, or because of the fact I'm getting older (73). 3 stone fell off me when I had a recurrence back in 2018, and after more chemo and radiotherapy it's all crept back on again! I refuse to watch anything on TV (usually 'dramatic' headlines) about cancer and new treatments; however, I will read literate and informed articles in my national newspaper as I trust the intelligence and integrity of the publication. The last thing any of us need is a guilt-trip loaded onto us - we're trying to get through what we need to in order not just to 'survive' but to enjoy life with our loved ones! Take care, blessings, Marie

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Thanks Marie, I really don't think weight has anything to do with it. I'm beginning to think there is no reason (except for BRCA gene).

You take care and carry on with a happy life, Zena xx

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I was a size 8 - 10, fit and healthy. Diagnosed at stage 3/4. All our own fault ladies!!

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I also think there should be some research on stress that causes the immune system to be lesser. Not sure it’s factual but I was at the peak of anxiety (bloody client almost was almost the death of me with a couple of years of terrible treatment to my staff and me— literally shaking daily). Got diagnosed during that period of time. But I am BRCA2 so it may have nothing to do with it either. I know my BRCA family side hardly had cancer before my father got two cancers — one reason why it was never even considered—so maybe they all led less stressful lives (I’m half kidding but know stress does relate to lower immune system— at least in some).

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I agree, I had an ongoing complaint made against me by a client because of a decision I'd made at work (NHS), which I was finding soul-destroying. I was starting to dread going to work at the time of diagnosis.

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Oh, how horrible. People don't realise how these sort of things affect people. xx

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I think you are right stress has more to do with it. I lost my mother I just got over that then my husband had a heart attack got him back to health and then my father died. It took 4 years to sort out his estate. All extremely stressful for details I won't go into. Life had just got back to normal and a year in I get my diagnosis last July oc4b. So I believe stress plays a big part.

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Some of you poor ladies certainly get pulled through the mill. I do hope you're doing well. Best wishes, Zena x

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I think stress could have a lot to do with it. On the whole I don't get too stressed but we all get stressed at some time during our lives. I'm BRCA2 as well and no one in my family carries the gene which is lucky. When I suggested I might be the first because someone must be they said definitely not.

Hope you're okay and booted out that client.

Best wishes, Zena xx

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Yes I would say I was obese but that one was of my d symptoms I suddenly dropped a couple of stone in a short time and weight has never just dropped off me. Been on HRT since early menopause at 37. Once chemo started weight went back on after a few sessions and now it's higher because fatigue means I am not on the go 24/7like i used to be. Certainly in hospital unit everyone is different shapes and sizes not all large ladies.

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I expected to lose weight with a cancer but instead I gained a lot of weight. I'm back to normal now. Give yourself some time and you'll get back to normal. xx

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Is tackling obesity the only solution to cancer? Weight is a problem caused by snacks, fast food, fast lifestyle (grabbing something as a parent for you and your kids to eat before rushing off to after school activities, eating on the go, no staff eating areas in work places, no proper lunch breaks etc).

As a retired nurse, working shifts and trying the get something healthy to eat having missed the canteen times and being offered only chocolate and crisps and fizzy drinks in vending machines I can appreciate that we don’t always portray a healthy image but we are just a normal section of society. The grab and go meal deals and go large. Supermarkets open all hours and shopping for quick meals or eating out instead of preparing and eating family meals, undervaluing the role of the parent at home. Encouraging parents to get back to work ASAP after having babies, limited time in the home to plan and prepare.

I NEED TO GET OFF MY SOAPBOX!

I’ve always been slightly overweight even in my teen years despite being very active. There’s never much mentioned about genetics and ethnicity and how that affects us all. Fat shaming is not acceptable and does little to address the problem of cancers and particularly female cancers. No one should be made to feel it’s their fault they have cancer. What about all the chemicals we have around us? The plastic ingested, the air pollution, hormones, additives, synthetic foods, cleaning products. It’s a battle. It’s far more complex than pointing fingers at individuals and making them feel they’re bad people.

Enjoy whatever you enjoy! Live life in balance as best you can. x

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Well said Cheryl. I couldn't agree more. There are too many things to take into account to blame it all on weight. I used to take my own lunch to work but I wouldn't say it was the healthiest thing you'd ever seen. I'm a bit lazy when it comes to cooking.

I do my best as you suggest. I'm definitely cutting down on meat now though.

I hope you are doing okay. Best wishes, Zena xx

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Hi Zena! I have always been a 14/16. After surgery a bit thinner. My surgeon told me to stay thin as it is a trigger xx

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Hi Zena ... interesting to read all the replies - you’ve got us all going - in a good way. I’ve always been really slim & fit & was at diagnosis. Never smoked, nor gave birth or BRCA. However I’m almost convinced (my own diagnoses) that a couple of years of IVF treatment followed just a few years later with 4yrs of HRT contributed to my OC. Was probably always lurking and maybe that was the trigger for me. Was interesting re somebody’s comment about GP’s not seeing OC patients often. My GP saw 3 of us within a year! Keep well xx

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Hi Ruth, I'd forgotten about HRT. I'd been on that years ago. There was a time when I wondered if the NoNo I'd bought for hairy legs had anything to do with it. Clutching at straws.

I've no idea how many my GP found because he didn't even find mine. I always say he couldn't spot a spot on the end of a nose.

Hope you're doing well. Best wishes, Zena xx

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Tnx Zena - you made me laugh with that remark! Xx

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... just to add - I was already in my early 40s when I started IVF so my poor old ovaries probably got a bit of a beating!

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I have been over and also perfect bmi most of life. Yo-yo dieting but EXELLENT BASeLINE diet ALL of my life. Fitness and stamina constant with keep fit, gym, walking, hills, bike, and running club plus 5 & 10K events. I smoked and stopped over 12yrs ago. That was my constant guilt re health and cancer. Always troubled with “hormone” issues either pmt since teenager (went on pill in 1970s for medical reasons or menopausal @ event HRT) I have three children and breast fed them all. My Fallopian tube cancer was stage one and deemed “curative” but was platinum resistant and 4 moths post chemo in Oct 2018 it was in peri aortic lymph node, no surgery or curative treatment. Been on weekly avastin and placletaxel for maintenance/control stage 4 not cure since December2018 and have passed my 6-9 mth sell by date so far. I think my point is, no one asked for this cancer and we prob all feel guilt of some sort but fat shaming or any other type of blame is not helpful . I personally put my life stresses , family and work /shift related situation which interferes with every cell in body with cortisol releases , sleep interference and weight inducing, hormone /insulin and immune system disruption as culprit. What some other persons body deals with mine didn’t. I don’t think I caused my cancer, I think it was my bodies “kryptonite” and it got me. I will continue to stay with whatever treatment I can stand to have to give me as much time as I can cope with. I didn’t cause or give myself cancer, my dna or cells were programmed and just waiting for the right combinations over years to trigger the response. Take care all you ladies, it is s scary place to be with this hanging over us but we are here for now. Make the best of what we can without beating ourselves up. Hold your head (bald is great) high and don’t apologise for being in our cancer club. Xxx

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Thanks for replying. This has been an interesting subject to me. It's brought up things I'd completely forgotten about and I agree with just about everything everyone has said. It's definitely not our fault and it can happen to anyone.

Best wishes,

Zena xx

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I was no overweight at diagnosis and I still got it!

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Me too, Jude, xx

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Definitely a lot overweight. But I always said I was the healthiest chubby person ever. Lol. No colds, flu, no high blood pressure or diabetes. Until this cancer.

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I think it's all random. We all do our best with what we've got and it's not our fault we got cancer. xx

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Hi zena, I saw that article. I was diagnosed two years ago and wasn't at all obese. However after all the treatment and various drugs I have gone up 2 dress sizes and don't know why as am only able to eat. Very small portions. I wonder if others have had this problem.

Anne x

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Hi Anne, I was the same. I put it down to steroids and although I only ate little portions and some weeks nothing at all I still gained weight. I did eat a lot of kitkats which I don't normally eat plus hospital sandwiches. It's all settled down now and I'm back to normal. It took a while. I did get fed up with people that thought I should be grateful to still be here and not worry about my weight. I wanted to be me again as far as possible.

Just be patient and you'll get there.

Best wishes, Zena xx

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Hi Zena. I also saw this and read about it.

I do understand that obesity is unhealthy and poses many health risks. And obviously there is a correlation between obesity and cancer. As with smoking, drinking alcohol, taking drugs, not exercising etc.

I find it interesting that friends and family that have sadly passed away from cancer or have recently been diagnosed with cancer and going through treatment are not overweight. Nor have been. They didn’t smoke and drank little.

My father sadly passed away after being diagnosed with lung cancer. He did smoke.

I was 8 and half stone when I was diagnosed with OC. Never smoked and have only had a drink on probably 6 occasions in my life. I have always been fit. Eaten well.

More and more people are being diagnosed with cancer.

Yes I know it’s published more. Yes it’s talked about amongst friends and family so we are all aware. We are living longer etc etc.

My worry is that the vast majority of my friends and family diagnosed are mostly under 60. A lot between 40 and 50. That I think is worrying.

Is it environmental? The increase in additives/sugar/fat in our diets. Plastic ? Pollution ?

Is it just luck ?

Had this always been the case or is it just that we are now aware.

Talked about this to my parents before my father passed away and they said none of their friends/family had cancer. The ones that sadly died tended to have had heart attacks or stokes. And certainly not at ‘young’ ages.

Interesting. And concerning. Xx

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I always thought of people dying from heart attacks. It seems everywhere you look now someone has cancer. At least it's not as scary as it once was. It was always an automatic death sentence but there's lot of hope now.

I think it is random who gets it but our environment doesn't help. I like a drink and have always said it's what keep the germs away as I only got the odd cold until the big OC. Now every little ache and pain I wonder if it's another cancer.

I think there will never be a perfect world and we all have to live our lives as we want to.

Best wishes, xxx

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I was hovering around the obesity threshold when diagnosed, and have seen a possible link to cancer mentioned before, in some publications. Well whether that was a contributor to my diagnosis or not (personally, I blame my non-functioning ovaries and IVF, when I was a perfectly normal weight, over the 10 years prior to diagnosis), I can't say.. but it's possible.

Also have to say that I gained a massive amount of weight post surgery, which I still struggle to lose again. And the oncologists keep dismissing it. 'Ah, lass, just be glad it's not the other way round, eh?' Grrrr.. ;) .

On the other hand, I've seen a family friend basically wither away after the initial OC surgery. She was diagnosed as a very fit 66-yr old who went runnig daily, weighing in at a bit more than 45 kg. To me as a non-medical person it just looked like her body didn't have enough reserves to recover from the massive surgery. Never started chemo. Basically got down to 38ish kg and just faded away within a few months. So.. there's that angle too.

Hang in there, ladies. xx. Maus

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I believed you needed a bit of weight on the bones to survive the loss of weight through chemo. I believed everyone lost weight on chemo. Shows what I know. I gained 2kg every week and didn't like it one little bit.

Back to normal now though thank goodness. It took a while though.

All the best Maus, xxx

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There is no way this latest "revelation" is true! I am a size 10/12 and was diagnosed last year. I have 8 sister-in-laws who are sizes 2X to 4X & half of them are lifetime smokers (my spouse is one of 16 kids!) - none of them have ovarian cancer. I think they pull reasons out of the air to see if the public will fall for it. ;)

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Totally agree. Is that American 10/12 or UK 10/12? xx

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It's nothing but fat-shaming dressed up as medical concern.

Scientifically, it is extremely difficult to prove ANY single causation factor in cancer. There are simply too many variables, and one can't properly adjust for all the factors.

I find it infuriating that big charities and government campaigns are allowed to promote 'latest findings' as if they have passed the most basic requirements for a valid scientific study.

There are certainly studies, valid and respected ones too, that show clear links and correlation between a person's ACE score and poor health in later life. The ACE (Adverse Childhood Experience) study is pretty robust from a data point of view. But I don't see the government pouring money into child services, early years education etc in order to improve health outcomes.

As always, it's easier to blame individuals for their "bad choices"

Grrrrrrr.

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That seems to be the way we're all thinking Jan. Too many factors to actually prove anything. I wonder how many people were actually in the study.

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Spotted a headline today that a glass of fruit juice a day is now being linked to cancer risk. Couldn't even be bothered to read the article so no idea what the research says. But it does demonstrate that there are all sorts of things that can fill the news.

I remember being taught statistics with an example of there being a high number of storks in Sweden and a high birth rate. Does that mean that storks deliver babies? No, because causality has not been taken into consideration.

I did read the article you refer to about the link of obesity to OC. It struck me that it was another way of using statistics to suit a particular purpose. There was no indication of how obesity was linked to OC (was it causality and if so which way around, was it actually just a reflection of society, etc). I think the figures were something like 490 where obesity and OC had been 'linked' (though not clear how) in 7,500 cases per year. So 6% of cases. So there are 94% of cases where it wasn't linked. Hardly newsworthy then.

Also there was some suggestion that obesity had overtaken smoking as a risk factor. But that was something like 25 cases (less than 1%) of OC linked to smoking (again, how was this linked?). I don't believe smoking has ever been linked to OC as a risk factor other than as a general risk factor for any health issue. So the suggestion of obesity overtaking it is nonsensical anyway.

I have to admit I hadn't read the article as fat shaming initially. Perhaps that's my research background where I've just looked at it from a different point of view, but the idea of blaming people hadn't actually occurred to me. I don't think you can point fingers of blame for things and I hope that the initial research was not done with that intention and that it won't be used in such a way.

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I didn't think of fat shaming either when I heard it. No one has a perfect life style we all eat and drink things, even if only occasionally, that are not good for us. How boring would life be if we couldn't have the odd treat. We all do different amounts of exercise. I've heard some people are addicted to the gym. That would never be me.

Another thing your post reminded me of is, when you watch TV adverts particularly for cosmetics the small print on the bottom of the screen often says things like 76% of 87 people agree. This is a ridiculously small amount.

Anyway, thanks for the reply and I'm sending best wishes, Zena x

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Yes indeed. And who are those 87 people? How were they selected? Did they actually ask 200 people but didn’t include the responses from 113 of them for some reason?

“There are lies, damn lies and statistics”.

I’m sure I’ve heard of research recently suggesting that exercise isn’t good for you as it doesn’t reflect how our bodies were meant to be. Go figure....

I think there’s a lot to be said for just doing what feels right for you at a certain point in time.

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Completely agree xx

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