Using Willpower to Quit Smoking

For those who are trying to quit on willpower alone, don't do it. You will be facing an uphill battle.

It’s extremely difficult to quit smoking when you approach it through using willpower by itself as you have to continually fight yourself on a daily basis – and if you slip up at any time, you have to start the battle again from scratch.

Just my 3 cents worth. :p

16 Replies

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  • Nice post but it might be better to say what you would recommend as well as what you don't.

    Personally, I don't think it matters what you use to get you past the early stages of the quit, NRT Champix or Allen Carr but without changing the way you think of smoking, and an understanding of why you do it is much much harder to quit for good.

  • It's all up in your head. If you are constantly told my family and friends that quit smoking is hard, then you will believe it.

    There is no real physical pain from nicotine withdrawal symptoms. Sure, you will get frustrated and have anxiety attacks, but they are nothing if you compare it to a heroin addict trying to give up heroin.

  • It's all up in your head. If you are constantly told my family and friends that quit smoking is hard, then you will believe it.

    There is no real physical pain from nicotine withdrawal symptoms. Sure, you will get frustrated and have anxiety attacks, but they are nothing if you compare it to a heroin addict trying to give up heroin.

    yeah i just read exactly that in my allen carr book

  • It really is true. After about 3 weeks, you'll no longer have these nicotine cravings and will be FREE as a bird.

  • Willpower...

    “The choice to control one’s behaviour.”

    “The unwavering strength of will to carry out one’s wishes.”

    This is most definitely a moot point and one that crops up from time to time.

    I blame Allen Carr for his belief that his method requires no willpower and therefore contradicts all other chemical solutions.

    All that’s happened of course is that people are just messing around with definitions.

    It is our subconscious mind that drives us to smoke and it is our subconscious mind that needs instruction to forget the whole thing and let us get on with a normal life.

    There are many ways to get that message across and it is that very message that every successful quitter has somehow managed to transmit.

    Everyone on this forum knows, either before or very shortly after they join, that nicotine withdrawal is a quick and painless event, unfortunately they then find that they’re not as free as a bird and they’ve that very same desire to smoke as they always did.

    If you can keep the subconscious in its place THEN you’re home free. Some people manage it at day one but most don’t and unfortunately it’s got little to do with willpower... :(

  • I think the main thing is wanting to quit and educating yourself,I tried will power alone on my other quits but the desire to smoke was still there,this time its very different,I have read,read,read until my eyes hurt and I know now Im mentaly prepared,it so different this time,Im 100% focused and ready :D

  • I hate to disagree but willpower is neaded,along with education and really wanting it.Smoking is the single hardest addiction I have beat.....all others are nothing to me.

    And anxiety attacks are far more serious than people think.I spent 1000 bucks for doctors to tell me it wasnt a heart attack.

  • Carey,

    WHAT EXACTLY IS THE POINT OF YOUR POST???

    Do you have a link that has been deleted?

    PP

  • Carey,

    WHAT EXACTLY IS THE POINT OF YOUR POST???

    Awww, Pru, don't burst her bubble - she's free as a bird, lucky girl !:D;)

  • The point of my post? I thought it's obvious in my first post. Willpower ALONE is not needed.

    You only need a little willpower to get you through the 3 weeks or so of the nicotine withdrawal symptoms.

    Some chaps try using willpower alone to quit, and I pity their struggles.

  • Maybe willpower is some quit aid we don't get over here..?

    I did a little search and came up with the Aussie champ car driver.. assets.espn.go.com/photo/20...

    but it can't possibly be him..?

    the NRT packets say, "requires willpower" so I guess it's the same stuff..?

    aaaaaahhhh found it.

    Good old google....

    1788

    I'm much happier now... :)

  • Maybe willpower is some quit aid we don't get over here..?

    I did a little search and came up with the Aussie champ car driver.. assets.espn.go.com/photo/20...

    but it can't possibly be him..?

    the NRT packets say, "requires willpower" so I guess it's the same stuff..?

    aaaaaahhhh found it.

    Good old google....

    1788

    I'm much happier now... :)

    PMSL thats so funny :D

  • Personally, i think that its will power that gets you through it. If we all thought that we couldn't do it cold turkey then none of us would ever succeed in attempting to give up.

    Will power has got me this far, then it can do it all the rest of the way ;)

  • I think that in doing anything that's hard, positive thinking helps a great deal. Once the negative thoughts start coming in, then it gets very hard to have the "willpower"

  • I was reluctant to use NRT after watching my mother in law quit cigarettes but become hopelessly addicted to lozenges.

    The cold turkey/willpower method is tough...damn tough....but it's do-able if you REALLY want to quit the smokes.

  • It does not matter what method you use eventually you will need to use willpower alone or be dendent on NRT for the rest of your life.

    I have tried NRT in the past but they did not work for me because I found them to be a constant reminder of smoking.

    Here I am on day 355 so CT has been by far the easiest and most successful method I have used.

    I agree Phil,Welcome back at least for a little while.......Congrats on day 355

    almost there.......

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