Why do some health professional behave in a... - Kidney Disease

Kidney Disease
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Why do some health professional behave in a nasty manner?

sandyandtweed
sandyandtweed
43 Replies

Hi there! Newly diagnosed with type 2 diabetes, despite it actually showing up three years ago, but no-one at the gp surgery bothered to tell me then(!) but also with Chronic kidney disease grade 4, as well as chronic lymphacytic leukaemia, and osteoearthritis of the spine, hands and feet, and high blood pressure. Yes I'm getting older and wearing out, but the manner in which the consultation was conducted by the practice nurse, who was supposed to be giving me the initial once over at the start of my diabetes career, was unpleasant to say the least. I dread going back to her at a later time. She had very poor 'people skills' and really upset me almost to the point of tears. Should I make a complaint? I was a nurse before I retired and I never treated a patient like that. Comments please.

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Bet117
Bet117NKF Ambassador

Hi sandyandtweed,

I am so sorry that you had such a disheartening experience with your physicians practice nurse.

No patient should be made to feel small due to age or illness; forget leave an office almost reduced to tears by an inappropriate verbalization made by a health care professional.

I also don't find " having a bad day" an excuse to be insensitive to patients, students or anyone else.

It is about treating the issue at hand with empathy and professionalism executed by the health care professional.

Unfortunately today, many health care professionals do not possess the listening skills and ethics that we did; therefore forcing patients to advocate for themselves.

If a health care professional

is not listening to you or working with you, perhaps it is time to seek out another person who will be attentive and better meet your needs as this is your health and well being.

If you feel that you are pleased with your physician, another route might be to make an appointment with them and discuss a referral to another practice nurse within the office.

If you are not comfortable with this person, you have the right to see someone else.

Below is a link to an article about reasons to part company with your doctor.

Take a deep breath and have faith that you will make the best decision for yourself. Seek support of your family and please feel free to reach out at any time as one or several of us will always reach back.

Bet ❤

Atricle:

medical-news.org/30-signs-t...

5 likes
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Jayhawker

Unfortunately I’ve encountered similar situations with a few persons associated with various doctors. In fact, right now the nurse with my new nephrologist is proving to be quite inefficient and then becomes rude.

My last appointment at the transplant center was also less than optimal with the transplant nurse who is case managing my case. She was curt and made a comment essentially wondering why everyone was so “grouchy” that day. I thought, but didn’t say, if they’re all having the same experience I’m having with you I can see why they’re a little less than thrilled...

In the transplant nurse’s case, she clearly wasn’t ready to meet with me for the appointment that day. The nurse with my regular nephrologist is just inefficient.

But they both handle their issues by interacting negatively with patients, unnecessary and unprofessional. I handle it by pausing for a moment so the person can gather themselves. I then say that I’ve only got this 15-minute appointment to learn what is happening with my medical condition as well as what I need to do to take care of myself ... That seems to take care of the situation. If that doesn’t work I then talk with the physician about the situation. I can always see a different nurse or nurse practitioner in the practice. I always say something like I’m most satisfied with the care I’m receiving from the doctor but have concerns about the nurse or nurse practitioner. I’d hope I wouldn’t have to seek out a new doctor simply to resolve an issue with a nurse ...

Jayhawker

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Mr_Kidney
Mr_Kidney
in reply to Jayhawker

Even, or should I say, especially in the medical field patients are customers and need to be treated with quality service and respect. That being said, customer service is a dying art

Before my second career as a teacher, I spent almost two decades as a corporate vice-president of training. Customer service was a huge component of my work.

There is an old saying, The customer is always right.". Unfortunately, employees feel that if the customer is always right, then the employee is always wrong.

My belief was/ is the customer is not always right, but they are treated as if they were.

This allows the employee to feel respected and still able to do all they can to make the customer's experience an enjoyable one and eager to return.

Too many businesses, including the medical profession, seem to have lost their way and as a result, many of their employees think they are always right and the customer/patient is always wrong.

Of course, that's how I see it, and I could be wrong.

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Jayhawker
Jayhawker
in reply to Mr_Kidney

I actually agree. I know that if I treated my graduate students the way I’ve been treated by some nurses, etc, I’d be hearing about it both from the students themselves and my Dean.

I had to wait nearly an hour for the nurse in the transplant center to send the lab orders to the lab before I could leave the hospital that day. While I waited I found myself reflecting about what I had just experienced in the transplant center. What was the primary question running through my mind?

Is this transplant center capable of providing quality follow-up care post-transplant should I be fortunate enough to qualify??

Their communication has not been great. Then the chaos in the center that day. It does cause me, the patient and customer, to stop and think. I’m sure they have no idea that that was what was on my mind as I left the center that day...

They have a very good reputation. However, they’re on track to perform 13.64% more transplants than average this year. It’s possible they simply don’t have enough staff to appropriately work with an additional 12 patients this year. (They normally perform about 88 transplants a year.)

Jayhawker

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Mr_Kidney
Mr_Kidney
in reply to Jayhawker

It sounds a bit arrogant to me. Are you aware of the Patients' Bill of Rights? I've attached a link below that explains it in detail. You might be especially interested in the fifth of the eight specific rights mentioned.

healthsourceglobal.com/docs...

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Jayhawker
Jayhawker
in reply to Mr_Kidney

I’m glad you posted these. I’ve been aware of them for some time now. I’d actually say they’ve got issues with the fourth and fifth rights listed. They have a tendency to just tell you to go to the lab, for instance, where blood is drawn . They don’t tell you why they’re drawing blood, etc. As the patient, I find myself asking the lab technician to tell me what labs are being run, ie, the name of the tests. But then I still need more specific information regarding what the tests check and why they’re checking this stuff for me.

I had asked the nurse, as I was being ushered out of the transplant center and sent to the lab at the end of that appointment without seeing anyone to explain my previous tests results to me, whether anyone was going to explain my prior test results to me. She just gave me a somewhat blank look and said nothing. I then said somewhat under my breath that apparently this was my problem and that I was obviously on my own; I’d have to find a doctor who could and would explain THEIR test results to me.

As I waited the hour in the lab reflecting on the chaos in the office that day, they called the lab and said I was to go back up to the transplant center after they drew my blood. I went back upstairs. That was when I finally saw Angela, my case manager and the transplant nurse. She was clearly unprepared for the appointment with me. I realized immediately that that was why she had cancelled that portion of my scheduled appointments that day.

They had also cancelled the appointment with the transplant nephrologist who had ordered all the tests. I had met with the social worker, a transplant surgeon, and a renal dietician. So I saw about 3/5 of the people I was supposed to see that day. But, unfortunately, I had only seen one key person, the transplant surgeon, of the five previously scheduled. Thus, no one I saw could go over my test data with me.

Angela started by saying somewhat curtly that she had planned to call me to talk with me at a later point in time. I said that unfortunately no one had mentioned that too me. I then asked why they had drawn blood for three more labs. She said, again curtly, that she was getting ready to tell me. I said good and that after she shared that information with me I needed someone to go over the results from the myriad of tests they’d ordered that had already been completed.

She gave me a sheet of paper listing the tests I had left to complete and who was responsible for ordering each. However two of the four highlighted tests had already been done . The results were back and had been sent back to the center about two weeks earlier. I clarified that with her. She seemed confused and continued to ruffle through a rather large stack of papers. So I sat quietly.

Eventually she said I’d have to see “my cardiologist” to have my cardiac data explained to me. I said that I didn’t have a cardiologist. She stared at me and asked why not. I said my PCP had never referred me to a cardiologist. I then said that the cardiologist they had sent me to for their testing had clearly stated that he would not either post or share my results with me because he had not ordered the tests. He has volunteered this information. I certainly wasn’t surprised as my past experience with doctors has been that the doctors who ordered the labs then explain the results to you.

That’s when she began trying to argue saying that I had to go to my cardiologist. I then said nothing more as she made the statement a few more times. I ultimately said that I have a friend whose brother is a cardiac surgeon in Chicago. (I live in Kansas City.) I guessed I could contact her to see if Tim would be so kind as to explain my cardiac test results to me...

At that point she finally told me that they hadn’t been able to find Dr Lee. He was the transplant nephrologist who had ordered the labs and was supposed to see me for a second appointment that day. Of course that was one of the appointments that had been cancelled.

I have no idea where Dr Lee was or why they couldn’t find him. However, they’ve got several transplant nephrologists with this center. So I asked whether one of the other transplant nephrologists could jump in to go over my data with me or did their center have a different procedure they followed in situations like this??

It was at this point that I said that it was clear to me that they were having some problems with staffing that day but that unfortunately I had had to take a day off of work to be there for what was supposed to be a day full of appointments. I only get that one day of direct access to them and that from my perspective two of the three most important appointments for the day had been cancelled with no explanation given and no idea when either would be rescheduled.

I said that this had been chaotic and more than a little confusing. I said while we all have bad days, we tend to handle ourselves professionally at work regardless AND we tend to tell our clients what is going on in these less than optimal situations. I ended by saying that not taking time to explain what they’re doing with me creates two major problems for me:

1. It automatically causes unnecessary stress and anxiety.

2. It does not give me sufficient information for me to make informed decisions about my medical care.

That was when she finally calmed down. Clearly these people don’t communicate well. In addition, there were real problems going on in the center that day. I have no idea how common that is with this center as I’ve only been there one other time.

So, yes, I’m left wondering. I’m not thrilled with what I experienced during this second visit. The first visit was just the opposite though. Consequently, at this point I’m going to see how the next appointment goes. And, of course, I may not qualify for a transplant in which case this is all irrelevant.

But definitely this second day at this center was not a great experience. Fortunately for them, I’m not overly stressed about the outcomes of this testing. I haven’t been planning on a transplant; I’ve thought it was a long shot for me. My new nephrologist has insisted I go through this testing. I’d already had quite a lot of it done prior to the referral. And I did want to have a thorough cardiovascular workup as I know I’m at such high risk for problems there too. So I’m pleased to have all this testing done. And among other things I’ve learned that my cardiovascular data looks very good. In fact all the testing done looks good.

Jayhawker

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Mr_Kidney
Mr_Kidney
in reply to Jayhawker

I see you have a difficult decision. Do you really trust that office to make a sound, reasonable decision? My experience is that medical personnel don't get do-overs. By the very nature of their work, they are expected to get it right the first time and every time. Are their organizational skills an indication of their decision- making skills? Or their surgical skills?

Kansas City is a big city. Are they your only option?

I'm not interested in a transplant but I can see your concerns. If you rock the boat are you likely to ruin your chances? I don't envy your decision but I wish you the best in dealing with the less than competent office staff.

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Jayhawker
Jayhawker
in reply to Mr_Kidney

Yes, this is definitely a dilemma. This is the better transplant center in the metro area. So I have decided to stay the course through this evaluation. But, yes, disorganization and inefficiency can and often do negatively impact medical care and outcomes.

Whether they view it this way or not, I’m interviewing them as I go through this evaluation. The first day of the interview went well. The second day had problems. Well l’ll see how the third day goes.

It’s an ethical problem they’re setting into motion though. This is certainly not good.

Jayhawker

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Bet117
Bet117NKF Ambassador
in reply to Jayhawker

I agree. If we treated a student the way we have been treated, or spoke to a parent the way some of these "professionals" speak to us; forget reprimand...Administrative suspension.

The students and Dean- agreed. My husband treats his college students with respect and listens with boundaries.

In his school, it would be Dept.Head, Dean, Chancellor.

We leave our personal briefcases at the door when we enter the building and pick up my professional briefcase when we enter and switch.

Taking out personal issues do not belong in the workplace.

Especially health care. Our lives count.

Rant over!

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Jayhawker
Jayhawker
in reply to Bet117

It sounds like both you and your husband are teachers. What areas do you each teach?

Jayhawker

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curiousmind2019

Transplant center staff are the worst. They don't communicate clearly on the various tests that need to be done and the timeline of the process. After 1.5 years, my potential donor is still stuck on the evaluation tests, they keep nitpicking on various very slight deviations from normal test results.. see specialist after specialist to confirm that it is nothing .. but seems they don't take any one's word for it and wants to rack up more and more expensive tests in their hospitals.. the last they demanded an MRI that is not covered.. and we are still not sure what to do with that one.. don't want to pay 30k out of pocket just so they can keep asking for even more tests after that.

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Jayhawker

Thanks for sharing your experiences with me. Tomorrow I prep for a colonoscopy which will occur Friday at 2:30pm. That’s supposed to be the end of the testing. I’m certainly hoping it is.

This has been a lot of testing over the past 2 1/2 months. It’s really nearly a full time job just to deal with all the scheduling, labs, and such.

Today I got to the pharmacy to pick up the prep stuff for the colonoscopy only to find that the GI practice nurse hadn’t sent the script to them. So more phone calls leaving messages.

I hope they get the script to the pharmacy by noon tomorrow so I can get the prep done and then this final test on Friday.

I’m still working full time. I’m in renal failure but not yet on dialysis. So I don’t have lots of extra energy. I am able to keep things pretty balanced on a daily basis normally so I don’t get too worn out. But this has felt like I’m running a marathon without training... I’m just hanging on at this point doing my best to get through this.

I’ll be drinking chicken broth only for food tomorrow and no food until after the procedure on Friday at 2:40pm. I’m a Type II diabetic (not on meds and managing with food and exercise). I’m sure I’ll be really dragging by the time I leave to come home Friday afternoon around 4pm. I’ve hit yo wonder what they were thinking scheduling the colonoscopy so late in the day on Friday—they haven’t done that with me in the past due to my diabetic condition.

Well, at this point, I’m taking this one step at a time. Drink nothing but chicken broth and water starting tomorrow morning. Call the GI office again if I haven’t heard from them by 9am. Get the prep stuff by noon tomorrow. Start the prep at 5pm tomorrow; right after work. Run to the bathroom all night as I try to sleep. Get up at 6am to begin the second phase of the prep. Finish drinking phase II of prep stuff by 9am. Continue trips to bathroom (I’m sure:). Leave for GI practice at hospital at 12:30pm. Checking at 1:30pm. Procedure st 2:30pm.

Ride home. Eat something, finally. Then likely fall into bed exhausted:)

On the up side I had the first of the two shingles shots this past Tuesday. I had absolutely no reaction to it. My arm wasn’t sore. No cold-like symptoms.that was definitely a pleasant surprise. So maybe this will be another pleasant surprise.

Jayhawker

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curiousmind2019

Sounds like a packed day. Glad you are taking it one step at a time. Hopefully this will be the final test. It's hard to do all this while feeling exhausted from the kidney condition.

2 likes
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Bet117
Bet117NKF Ambassador
in reply to Jayhawker

Hi Jayhawker,

It will all be good! Keep that thought! You know the prep is the worst of it.

I had my colonoscopy in March with a 7am check in time for an 8am procedure.

We grabbed a bagel on the way home and flopped!

My reward was a trip to the Baseball Hall of Fame the next day; planned in the AM.

" Keep your eye on the prize!" Good results and plan a perk after! In my thoughts.

Bet

PS: With your good results, will run the shingles shot by my PCP when I speak to her in a few weeks! Thanks!

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sandyandtweed

Hi! How did the colonoscopy go? I've had two of them in the past and it's not one of those things that normally crop up in polite society, but being in the same boat with a lot of lovely people it's so refreshing to admit that some medical procedures really are the pits! And to think at one time way back in the mists of time, I actually was a health medical, albeit in a minor role as a humble nurse. How fate catches up with you! Love to hear from you when you have got the energy,

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Jayhawker

Thanks for asking! The prep was the typical nightmare. However, the GI checked my renal function right before the colonoscopy (after the prep). He was focused specifically on my potassium level and my creatinine. Of course I was extremely dehydrated by that point. Nevertheless, my potassium was 4.6, in the normal range, and my creatinine was 3.3, only slightly higher than its typical 3.0.

So, all in all, I’m calling this a win . The procedure is now done. No polyps found. I’m back to normal with hydration and such. And, this was the last test required for transplant eligibility. Now I’m hoping to get a call from the transplant center sometime this next week to schedule another appointment. Hopefully, at that appointment, I’ll hear whether they’re qualifying me for a transplant or not.

And nurses are often the best source of medical information🐶🐶

Jayhawker

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sandyandtweed

Lovely to know that you are all shiny clean inside! I bet that makes you feel a whole lot better to know that the 'spring cleaning' was worth all that hassle. Wishing you luck for all that's ahead of you.

1 like
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Bet117
Bet117NKF Ambassador
in reply to curiousmind2019

Hi curiousmind,

How awful! Unfortunately, as things stand, often the money making superceeds the patient care.

My brother has been in a battle with the insurance plan that they changed him to and the hospital where he receives and has been receiving phlebbotemies for years. New insurance plan sees required blood work prior to procedure as visit to pathologist, who he never sees; and charges. No one at the insurance knows what end is up and refuses to pay so he received bills. Unnecessary stress.

Prior insurance plan from them, never had an issue. We are glad that he has been dropped back to initial plan.

Just me but I go in with a notebook and ask a lot of questions.

This anguish is neither good for you or your donor.

You can't alter ugly demeanor of people, but you can be the proactive positive one when dealing with them.

Please let me know the outcome of this.

Thoughts and prayers are with you!

Bet

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lowraind

Yes, make a complaint.

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Kbressler
KbresslerNKF Peer Mentor

If your perception of this health professional is as you write, you may want to kindly confront her with her abrasive behavior to you. Discuss with her that you found her behavior unacceptable. If you do that and it continues on your next visit you need to speak to her supervisor. It’s tough to be sick with kidney disease and it is often time hard to confront bad behavior, it is better to address it at the time it happens rather then waiting. Best of luck to you and hopefully you can resolve it and work towards getting your health back.

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Rene70

Yes please report them... Hope this wasn't in Indianapolis, there nasty moat of the time. Nevertheless, I had to leave a doctor because his staff was so rude and never schedule me to see a endocrinologist. Also had a coordinator with an additude, because I would not start Diaylsis when she wanted me to. Not the" Doctor" but her she try to convince me with wrong info to scare me.

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Jayhawker
Jayhawker
in reply to Rene70

Yes, I’ve definitely run into nurses in a GI practice who continuously told me how sick I am and how dangerous it is for me to have a colonoscopy, etc. Totally unnecessary. We don’t need the medical community trafficking in stress and anxiety for any of us. We’re each already managing a pretty major amount of both on our own.

Jayhawker

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Bet117
Bet117NKF Ambassador
in reply to Rene70

Rene,

What a terrible experience!

I would let the doctor know that you were provided with incorrect information which is key.

Bear in mind, not easy, but you are entitled to seek a second opinion and another physician if your medical team is not communicating with you.

Stay strong and let us know how you are.

B..

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Oldearkie_83

It sounds like she may be inflicted with Hubris. That happens a lot among among those who are barely proficient in their job skills. Sure, I'd make a complaint in writing, to her superior and move on.

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Fatbuddy

Sorry to know about your bad experience.

I am in USA -- some times we all get carried away - with emotions --

Here we have to pay premium- some times extra to have special insurance

called - PPO - means --you can go to any doctor - and have right to change --

or go to a specialist - without a reference from GP.

Also I am surprised -that you are expecting Nurse to tell you - diagnosis --- usually Doctor should inform you --

Here in USA - we also get a blood test report Direct from the lab - so we can read and see

Since you have some other issues --it is hard and may be not advisable to change doctors more often - stick with one you have and if you are happy - just ask them question again - nicely and politely --or take another friend ( a physician ) with you - at next appointment --he will respond positively --

Hope most of your treatments working well and not that expensive. enjoy the life.

**** I have heard - some times in the news - that Europe and Canada has - bad Health care

system - insurance - Socialize Medicine -- is that true ? just curious - how do you pay or government pays ?

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Oldearkie_83

If the government pays, you pay. Where do you think the guvament gets the money?

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Fatbuddy

sorry-- no more arguments - discussion..

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Jayhawker
Jayhawker
in reply to Fatbuddy

I’m in the USA too. And, yes, I’ve got medical insurance that’s actually very good with the option to choose my own doctor, dialysis center, transplant center, etc.

I actually didn’t ask the nurse to go over my tests with me; I asked her to find a doctor who would do that. I had looked at all the test data as it came in. But this business of determining whether the results are strong enough to qualify for a transplant is actually fairly complex. So I don’t want to rely on my non-medical interpretation; rather, I need to hear a professional interpretation of my data and then have the opportunity to hear the clinical interpretation of that data within the context of transplant eligibility criteria. That requires a doctor. Consequently, I had expected (and was initially scheduled) to see the renal nephrologist again in the second visit.

I agree, it’s always best to have a friend or family member with you at doctors appointments, particularly those at a transplant center. My friend who had been with me for both appointments was also surprised at the difference between the two. She actually tends to be much less patient than I am🐶

But as I said in my initial post, there was a lot of chaos in the transplant center that day. And they cancelled about half of the appointments they had initially scheduled for me. In addition, they gave me no information regarding the additional tests they were ordering. I’m a pretty engaged and empowered patient. Thus, I’m not likely to compliantly arrive for tests that haven’t been explained to me...

Nevertheless, I’ve decided to give them the benefit of the doubt and see how the third day goes. Like I said, their outcomes are good. This transplant center is ranked well nationally. And I’m anxious about all of this so realize that my tolerance for this diet of thing is lower than it would be normally.

However, while this is all very normal and routine for them, it is anything but for me. I expect that comment applies to many of us. I just think the medical community in general tends to loose sight of that.

Jayhawker

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Fatbuddy
Fatbuddy
in reply to Jayhawker

Thank you friend -- I am glad you have a good insurance. I just thought he ( she ) was in UK. May be I am wrong.

Also - I mentioned to have another physician - with him at next appoitment - then some times as a courtesy --they may give better explanation.

Medical conditions - different for each individual - and when it happens to us - we are only one to suffer and make decisions.

I wish all your tests come out okay and have good recovery.

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Bet117
Bet117NKF Ambassador
in reply to Fatbuddy

Fatbuddy,

I have PPO and will continue to carry it as I prefer having choices and no referrals.

My close friend is in the UK. Her health care is covered, I believe through an internal tax. It is my understanding that the GP carries the ball unless something manifests in a severe range ; stage 3 CKD is one that would get them to a nephrologist or they need ER care. Otherwise they pay out of pocket to see a specialist.

Give me a choice-PPO!

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Fatbuddy
Fatbuddy
in reply to Bet117

Thank you my friend -- do not feel bad, please. I am just trying to understand first hand.

I am 74 and have Medicare Advantage Plan with Aetna - PPO.

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Bet117
Bet117NKF Ambassador
in reply to Fatbuddy

Fatbuddy,

I would call them. If you have PPO you have choices. See if they can send you literature on the plan and people in the network.

Let them explain it to you as well.

Please let me know what you come up with! 😊

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Fatbuddy
Fatbuddy
in reply to Bet117

what ? Literature of what ?

I have Aetna - PPO for over six years now - had Humana one year - and did not like - so I switched back to Aetna -

They send book every tear - I can go to any

Not sure what are you referring to

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JimVanHorn

Well, my diabetic doctor has wonderful people skills and usually is nice to me, however, once time when I did not follow his instructions, he was short with me. I also felt like a lesser person. This event did help me to follow his future instructions. I never know how much stress he has and frustrated he may be from other patients. I give him a break because he helps me with all my internal medications and problems. If you are new to diabetes (I have had it for 45 years) start reading everything you can about the drugs, diet, and side effects on your own. Learn how low sugar levels effect your other diseases. Find out about how to check your sugar levels at home. There is much to learn, look at the Davita website. Maybe you will help with your doctor's frustrations.

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Dustypye

Hello,

I'm sorry to hear this. I had a very bad experience with the first hospital I went to prior to my transplant. I left them and went to a better one. I also had bad experiences with doctors both before and after my transplant. I complained about both. You are your own advocate. Don't be afraid to stand up for yourself. For these people, it's a job, for you though, it's your life. Also, my mother was an RN, so, I know what you mean about good/bad bedside manner. I hope your next experience is less stressful.

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DeeLo

I would definatly make a formal complaint. No one should be treated that way. Personally, I have seen this rudeness and callousness from nurses more often than not in recent years. I am also sad to hear about the way in which your diabetes diagnosis is being handled. My husband's renal failure, leg amputation, neuropathy, eye surgeries, etc., all happened because his diabetes was never diagnosed properly. He's a lifelong type 2 but also a life long insulin resistant. His doctors never treated his illness accordingly. Unfortunately, you have to stand up for yourself and be your own advocate. In my opinion, you are completely in the right to make a professional, firm, and detailed complaint about the nature in which you were treated. Good luck to you with everything!

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Bassetmommer
BassetmommerNKF Ambassador

Hi Sandy,

YES do complain. File a formal complaint and if there is a patient advocacy group connected to the practice let them know.

There is NO excuse.

My past work experience was to work with clinicians and train them to be more compassionate and patient centered. Some come out of school and since it is so cut throat, they think that they way they are treated in school/residency is the way to treat patients.

It is not and no one should have to tolerate it.

If she get mad or even with you, make sure you report that as well. We have on nurse with my PCP practice who was surly on the phone. I reported her to the Doc and had a 1:1 conversation with her. She is so much more pleasant now.

I think the fellow ambassadors here agree. Do something about helping her to change. If she is rude to you, she is rude to others.

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Bet117
Bet117NKF Ambassador
in reply to Bassetmommer

Absolutely! I totally

agree, Bassetmommer!

Many times doctors are not aware of what is going on or how things are being presented beyond their exam rooms unless someone brings it to their attention.

These people are representing the practice, hospital or medical center.

If they are not conducting themselves in a professional manner fitting their position, their presentation and delivery should be addressed and if not adjusted, asked to leave.

The patient should come first!

2 likes
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Bassetmommer
BassetmommerNKF Ambassador
in reply to Bet117

omg, I just saw how many errors I had in my reply. The shingles went into my eye and so I am a little sight challenged. :( But definitely on the mend.

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Bet117
Bet117NKF Ambassador
in reply to Bassetmommer

Don't sweat the small stuff.

If I use my phone to respond, it mis-spells, I correct it and it jumps again.

The most important thing is that you are feeling better and took the time to generate such a great response !

😊

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Jayhawker

So glad you’re on the mend!

Jayhawker

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Cazzy41

Hey Sandy. I’m so sorry you had to go through this and I’m so glad you know you have the right to make a complaint. Nobody has the right to make you feel small and inferior, especially a doctor or health professional. Please push forward and put your complaint in writing as well as voicing it. I had a bad time after my transplant and I don’t want to put it on here as it may frighten some people out of transplant and that is not my intention. But let me put it this way it was soooo serious I have now decided to pursue this through legal channels and it’s so soul destroying when those that are supposed to look after us either belittle and ignore us or completely let us down. You do what you must and please keep me posted xxxx

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