Hello looking for support

Hi I am new here , diagnosed with supraventricular tachycardia 4 years ago . Had two unsuccessful Ablations ,on medication ,had pacemaker fitted Jan 15 as medication made my heart rate low ,just had an episode ,?second one in 4 months after being free from them for over 12 months , so feeling very low and exhausted I wish I knew the cause because I feel really unwell after an episode with no motivation and muscle pain around my left upper heart area and down my left torso and arm ??? Does anyone else have these symptoms ???.I did not go to hospital this time but self medicated with telephone support from my arrhythmia nurse I did see a doctor at my surgery on the day who diagnosed an infection and gave me antibiotics ,I could not bear to go to a&e mostly as I did not want the heart stopping medication ,had it 3 times in April but did not work

3 Replies

  • Hi Olly... so sorry to hear you are feeling so miserable and it is understandable if you have had two failed ablations. And yes, after a bad turn of arrhythmia, we can all feel grim for a day or two. Two episodes of SPV in 18 months is still pretty good, however, and having a pacemaker fitted is evidence that the doctors are looking after you. {Although I believe a pacemaker is a 'safety feature' and won't 'cure' you.} I think it is adjusting to this ongoing situation which is making you feel so miserable! Both my aunt and my father had pacemakers fitted and were fine for years after that. Both lived to 90! Do speak to your doctor again for reassurance and help with anxiety.

  • Thank you lizty for your reply. Feeling more up beat now and trying to be more positive.

    Olly 1234

  • Hi Olly,

    Now you have a pacemaker your doctors should be able to get more information about your tachycardia, because the pacemaker should record any abnormal rhythm and show how it started. So you should go back to the pacing clinic and get the physiologists to download the tracings from your pacemaker and show your cardiologist who may be able to figure out exactly what kind of SVT it is. It may require a different kind of ablation: do consider it – "third time lucky"...