Stuttering: Over the week or maybe more, I've... - Headway

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Stuttering

Chelle3069 profile image
Chelle3069

Over the week or maybe more, I've started stuttering from nowhere. Never done this before and have no idea why. I know or should I say 'I think ' I had a seizure which as I live on my own just going by the bump on my head that couldn't explain. I can't talk to people very easily without the struggling of getting a sentence out, but the weird thing is that I can talk to my dog fine but not people. Could anyone advise, can't seem to get into see my doctors and don't want to ring my doctors again as the receptionist seemed to me to be getting frustrated with me on the phone. I've never done any of this before. Help

17 Replies

Hi. Give the Headway helpline a call on 0808 800 2244. They will be able to advise you.

I hope you get it sorted.

Wishing you all the best.

Chelle3069 profile image
Chelle3069 in reply to Marnie22

I don't want to because of the stuttering, I don't really want to talk to anyone because of it. Scared to mainly.

Marnie22 profile image
Marnie22 in reply to Chelle3069

Hi. You can email them on enquiries@headway.org.uk

I think it would be good to get advice from someone. Best wishes.

Chelle3069 profile image
Chelle3069 in reply to Marnie22

I'll try that way doesn't scare me as much as talking does at the moment. Thanks

Marnie22 profile image
Marnie22 in reply to Chelle3069

They are really, really friendly and helpful. I have had lots of help from them. They will be only too happy to help because that's what they exist for. Good luck.

Chelle3069 profile image
Chelle3069 in reply to Marnie22

Thank you, I've just emailed them to see what they suggest or their opinion on it.

Marnie22 profile image
Marnie22 in reply to Chelle3069

🙂🌸

I hope you hear from Headway Chelle ; they're patient and none judgmental. The fact you're able to talk to your dog suggests you have anxiety issues with people.

Have you tried singing ? It would be interesting to see whether your stuttering is still there when singing ; it's often the case that folk who're badly affected lose the stutter when singing.. Cat x

Hi Chelle3069I hope Headway can give some advice. My sister who has post concussion syndrome (2 head injuries Oct/Nov last year) developed a stutter out of nowhere just after Christmas. It was probably anxiety related - but in her case it has sorted itself out alongside her efforts to manage fatigue properly.

Do try the singing - it can be a wonderful tonic.

Good luck

I'm not sure where, but I'm beginning to think as people have been saying they think my stuttering has come from anxiety with people. The whole lockdown has mostly only been me and my dog, Alfie, not had much contact if any so maybe now having to see people has set it off. Might be overthinking not sure. But would like to say thank you to everyone that was very kind of you to reply. Headway got back to me by email and have said the same thing, and mentioned the singing like Cat mentioned and few others so will give it a go today and scare the dog. lol Can't sing for toffees good job it's only me and Alfie about.

cat3 profile image
cat3 in reply to Chelle3069

Chelle, sing songs you know all the words to (or find them on Google) and keep practicing. Alfie might look a bit disapproving at first, but hopefully, like most animals, he'll think you're doing it for him ! Good luck... x

Chelle3069 profile image
Chelle3069 in reply to cat3

Hi, Cat thankyou for your kind words, been going around singing ba ba black sheep. Stupid I know and got Alfie enjoying it too.

cat3 profile image
cat3 in reply to Chelle3069

Ha ha .......you won't go far wrong with nursery rhymes Chelle ; good to hear Alfie's enjoying it too ! Keep at it and let us know how you get on... x

I'm not sure if I have what you would call a stutter. I have certain words that I just can't say without having a full on WWF wrestling match with my mouth, this includes my last name (surprising how much you use your name).

I don't know at what stage this started, but my recovery stopped at three months post injury. There is no rhyme or reason as to what word's get stuck. Sometimes if I know the word is going to come up, I can rehearse the word, but then it comes out like a drill sargent, barking order's.

I usually phonetically spell the word out, which is ok with the older generation or ex forces, but it does tend to confuse the younger generation.

With a lot of words, I can substitute a word, even if this requires extending the sentence, which then has another problem of loosing track of the subject.

Usually stutters are referred to a speech therapist as a starting point, and a psychologist may be involved.

Thank you for replying to me, I know for a long time before this I struggled with what word I wanted to say, but by the time it got from my brain to my mouth it comes out as something quite different and mostly stupid word that makes people laugh because it's completely the wrong word, but sometimes I get embarrassed. They don't seem to understand I can't help what my brain does. It has a mind of its own mostly

Hi Chelle, I have had some real bloopers, sometimes if I haven't noticed, I soon cotton on by the expression of either shock or laughter.

Maybe it's my personality but I don't find it embarrassing, I just find it hilarious, considering I don't understand many jokes, it brings a bit of life into what is grey.

I had a drum teacher as a kid, he use to say, if you are going to make a cock up, make sure it's loud and proud. That has served me well even before my brain hiccup.

You can't change how everyone responds, but you are in control of how you react to their response. So best to be loud and proud, it's their problem, not yours.

Life is hard enough after brain injury, and there are things that I don't like, but I can't please everyone all of the time, I try to not intentionally upset people, but if I do, that is life, that would happen brain injury or not.

I had stuttering and difficulty getting my words out often in the very beginning of this concussion. Now it rarely happens. I knew what I wanted to say but it just would not come out. It was frustrating but I’ve learned to take my time, slow down, deep breath and talk; this usually helps me to get the words out. I hope this helps

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