Mould Spores

Hi and not sure if this post will get through as it is does partly have a commercial angle. We are about to start test with some Uni's in Scotland to provide UK based validity of our products which not only kills the mould but also spores whic are nigh on impossible to achieve.

We are effective predominantly targeting properties following floods (www.floodhit.co.uk) but feel that the membership here may benefit from at least knowing a little more can be done that the present "norm"

Gordon.

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  • I for one would be interested in more information and your test results. I find it really diffficult in UK to get anyone to even understand that there is risk/danger from unseen mold and mycotoxins and spores.

  • The 'norm' for a flood hit home would be to identify and replace areas and materials affected by the flood. Your approach is very different and potentially useful in damp homes too. I am Interested in the results of your research work in Scotland.

  • Our 'floodhit' de natures all bacteria, fungus, spores, yeasts and viruses and therefore allows the timber structure or members to remain. It is similar to that used to clean water systems but due to our special wetting agent it can denature spores where no one else can. Normal treatments kill the fungus only and leaves surfaces ripe for the spores to propogate straight away.

    Our 2nd treatment prevents bacterial / microbial growth on any surface including textiles.

    Gordon.

  • Hi Gordon,

    Not sure where you are located. My flat has tested positive after continuing flooding and leaks and landlord disrepair.

    I am at point of giving up because I cannot find a solicitor near Brighton who actually understands and believes in the danger posed by seen and unseen molds.

    So my only alternative seems to self pay my move so that there is some prayer I may regain some of my health.

    I understand that I should have all my clothing and linens professionally dry cleaned and laundered. Any special instructions?

    Next queries may be slightly unusual. I spent my working life in Asia and therefore have antique rugs and scrolls painted on silk fabric. These are all over 200 years old and very very fragile. I figure I can take scrolls to be cut and framed under air tight glass--something I never wanted to do but better than throwing them out and some mold is visible on wood and silk at bottom of one. Would the glass framing protect us enough?

    Second query, the antique rugs---again very old and I had them specially treated before we moved back to UK but now they have been rolled up on top of shelf and untouched by water for 5 years but worried about UNSEEN mold. Any suggestions?

    Third query, I have a almost new 2 seater sofa in a discontinued 100% SILK fabric and colour which is my favourite. The salon has tested for high concentrations, so what do I do with the sofa? Do you clean it as a specialist? Or do you have someone to recommend?

    At least it gives me something to think about while I am wheezing!

    Thank you.

    Sara

  • 1) Scotland !

    2) visit glibalindoorhealthnetwork.com

    3) I'd say you only need to Dry Clean clothes which normally require that otherwise just clean as normal.

    4) Mould spores are everywhere but when in high concentrations is when it will 'normally' affect health. Therefore the frame may be airtight but if the conditions are correct then the Mould will start growing.

    5) can't remove staining and not a specialist in textiles.

    6) just clean rugs etc in normal ways and keep dry.

    7) survivingmold.com is Dr Shoemakers (in the USA though!) site and very good.

    I'm at early stages yet setting up but website is brucepropertyservices.com

    Gordon

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