Cholesterol Blood Tests - Fasting or not? - Cholesterol Support

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Cholesterol Blood Tests - Fasting or not?

RayH2
RayH2
5 Replies

Does anyone have any views or comments on the change away from fasting before cholesterol blood tests? A few years back it was considered essential to fast before the blood test but now not the case, at least in my surgery.

Does anyone know what effect this has on the actual results? Typically will it give higher or lower readings and in which category?

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oldestnewest
sandybrown

HI,

There has been many changes in blood testing, why? no one can answer it. It is guide lines.

For both blood cholesterol and blood sugar fasting is no longer necessary.

In my sugary, on a Wednesday morning just before there will be a very long Q for blood test.

Now days there are many rooms with HCA, appointment any time of the day for blood cholesterol and blood sugar(HbA1C, 90 day average.).

There are few who still get fasting blood test done!

You may find more information on this link :

healthline.com/health/high-...

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RayH2
RayH2
in reply to sandybrown

Thanks, I will take a look.

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sandybrown

"Getting your cholesterol levels tested is an important part of keeping your heart and blood vessels healthy. In general, fasting before your test isn’t required. But your doctor may recommend fasting if you’re already taking a cholesterol medication.

Be sure to ask your doctor before your test whether you need to fast.

"

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sos007
sos007Ambassador

Yes, the guidelines changed because the researchers did not see a significant difference in LDL-C values. 75% of your cholesterol is generated from your own liver.

That said, LDL-C is gradually losing its relevance as an indicator of CVD risk.

A better biomarker is ApoB which measures LDL-P (particle number).

The other more useful biomarker is 'triglycerides' which are a normal part of the lipid panel and thus you should be fasting for that one. Whenever you get a blood test you should also measure for ALT (liver enzyme) and uric acid. Both of these are proxies for sugar and simple carbohydrate consumption. An elevated ALT may indicate fatty liver disease which means you are storing too much fat in your liver due to your diet and lifestyle.

If you focus on eliminating dietary consumption of processed foods, sugar, and simple carbohydrates, all of your biomarkers will normalize and you will reduce your risk of CVD.

If you are above your optimal weight, your objective should be to normalize your weight by permanently changing your dietary habits and lifestyle.

See my posting 'Is It Time to Retire Cholesterol Tests?'

Good luck.

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RayH2
RayH2
in reply to sos007

Ok, thanks that is interesting I will take a look.

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