79 year old dad just went off atorvast... - Cholesterol Support

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79 year old dad just went off atorvastatin

pamant
pamant
18 Replies

My dad was on 20 mil atorvastatin for 10 years.. They put him on it for high cholesterol. He has no history of heart disease. His mother is 100 and still alive. Been told by the doctors that she has the organs of someone 20 years younger even though she smoked and ate a high fat died. They are Sicilian. My father started to decline about 5 years ago, memory problems, confusion, muscle weakness. He shuffles. He was referred to a neurologist and it was determined that his issue was not neurological. He just recently allowed me and my sister to intervene and contact his doctor. This is when I asked for a list of his meds from him and discovered that he was taking the statin. I did a bunch of research and was horrified to find all of his symptoms listed. I contacted my dad and his doctor. His doctor said, "Yes, the recent research shows that those symptoms could be a side effect from the statin and it's okay for your dad to go off of it." His doctor was on his way to retiring. My dad has now been off the statin for 3 days. He has a new younger doctor who I will be talking to. I am wondering about CoQ10 supplementation. Also, anyone else go off of a statin after prolonged use and regain funcitoning? After 3 days my dad says that he doesn't feel to much of a difference but sounds way more energetic on the phone. He seemed so depressed, like a zombie. Would really love to hear stories of going off of it after many years and what has helped. This cholesterol lowering drug thing seems to be quit a racket.

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Londinium

Hi Pamant,

It is regrettable that your father's doctor, apparently, led your father to this situation.

As I understand it, CoQ10 should always be considered alongside statins because the statins deplete CoQ10. Any doctor who doesn't advise/prescribe CoQ10 when prescribing statins is, in my opinion, doing harm.

As far as I know, it's best to initially take CoQ10 at a higher dose to load the heart/body/cells and then to, perhaps, take a lower dose longterm. Re CoQ10, look up Dr Peter Langsjoen. I may have already inc. him in my post about statins. If not, look for his podcasts and interviews.

Of course, you will need to test your father's Vitamin D and Vitamin B12 levels.

Always get printouts of any lab results that are performed, and make sure you are given the lab reference ranges too.

Cholesterol and Vitamin D work together. Statins, as you know, reduce cholesterol. It is important to achieve and maintain Vitamin D blood serum of an OPTIMAL level. Optimal Vitamin D is important for the brain.

From the following pdf: "A Scientists’ Call to Action has been issued to alert the public to the importance to have vitamin D serum levels between 40 and 60 nanograms/milliliter (100- 150 nanomoles/liter) to prevent these diseases. Implementing this level is safe and inexpensive."

grassrootshealth.net/wp-con...

I would also suggest testing your father's thyroid function i.e. by testing, at the very least, the FT3, FT4 and TSH. Do not fall into the trap of being told, and erroneously believing, that only the TSH needs testing, or that only the TSH and FT4 need testing.

I'm assuming you have recently tested your father's cholesterol and lipids? If not, then it'd be good to do that.

Many people can, on this forum, provide opinions and advice and also direct you to publications and videos, such as those in my statin post. But your father and you will, ultimately, have to decide for yourselves.

healthunlocked.com/choleste...

Encourage your father to consume, if possible, good quality foods and fats, and to keep sugars and carbs low or moderate.

Good luck 🖖🏻

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pamant
pamant
in reply to Londinium

Thanks. Good information. From what I have been researching testing cholesterol alone is pointless unless the LDL types are assessed as there is a difference between LDL and that in some people what is considered bad LDL cholesterol is actually helpful. My father not anyone in his family has had heart issues. His mother is 100, had high cholesterol. The doctors say that her organs are like someone 20 years younger. The more I research, the more this statin thing seems overblown. Helpful for some middle aged men with a history heart issues but not great outcomes for anyone else. My dad seems to have been poisoned by the stuff.

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Londinium
Londinium
in reply to pamant

Yes, I did say cholesterol and lipids i.e. not just cholesterol. 🖖🏻

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pamant
pamant
in reply to Londinium

Yes. Thank you for your reply. Hopefully everything will be tested properly.

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bobaxford

I am 67 and came off statins about 18 months ago. I was on them for 12 years and believe it affected my muscles and I always felt fatigued. I now feel so much better but it took me a few months to notice the changes.

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pamant
pamant
in reply to bobaxford

Good thing you caught in! Wish I knew all of this years ago. Just found out last weekend that he was on it.

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Sue0000

I have just ordered Q10 because I refuse to take statins i will let u know how I get on

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cb67

Thank God you intervened. Yes, he absolutely needs CoQ10. That statin depletes CoQ10. It's a mystery why doctors don't tell their patients this. I was on the same medicine only for 1 year though. I also began with memory loss but the worst was the excruciating body pain. I had so much calf/ heel/ foot pain I had begun shuffling. Most of the day I just layed on the couch. It took me about 3 months before i started to feel like myself again. There is hope for your dad. My cardiologist put me on a keto diet. NO sugar. But no meds either. Good luck. Cheryl

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pamant
pamant
in reply to cb67

Oh Cheryl, that sounds terrible. Glad to hear that you are recovering and that you have a good Dr. My dad also has the Statin shuffle. His muscles are so weak.

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pamant
pamant
in reply to pamant

And I hear ya about the sugar. I will tackle that next with my parents. Trying not to overwhelm them.

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sos007
sos007Ambassador

Male age 55, 5'10" tall or 178 cm; waist circumference 31" or 79 cm. 155 lbs or 70.31 kg.

I had a 40" (101.6 cm) waist; weighed 195 lbs or 88.5 kg. prior to my surgery.

I had a triple bypass March 2015. I was put on 30 mg of Crestor (statin) as well as a beta blocker, baby aspirin, an anticoagulant and blood pressure medication.

After the surgery I began experiencing forgetfulness, mood swings and severe anxiety, eventually my shoulder muscle ached so bad that I couldn't sleep. 9 months after the surgery, I decided to radically change my diet and lifestyle in order to get off the Crestor.

As I lost weight, I gradually titrated down my dosages for all meds until by October 2016, I completely stopped all meds. It took 1-2 months before I felt like myself again.

I'm convinced that Crestor (statins) as well as the beta-blocker medication were the cause of my anxiety, forgetfulness and mood swings.

I'm now back to my normal optimistic self. In the process, I've developed a new lifestyle focused on a plant-based diet and ensure that I exercise every day, either by walking for 30-60 minutes or working out in the gym. I also do push-ups as part of my gym routine. Resistance training is essential to ensure you don't lose muscle mass.

I also ensure I consume 80 to 100 grams of protein daily. Most older people don't consume enough protein - the average male needs about 60 grams of protein - more if they are physically active as I am.

My sources of protein are egg whites, legumes (beans, lentils, chick peas), fish, nuts, nut butter (almond butter) and a plant-based protein powder that I make into a smoothie using one cup of almond milk, a half cup of 0% fat Greek yogurt, and a half cup of frozen wild blueberries.

It is also essential to ensure good blood flow and to regulate blood pressure to have a large portion of greens on a daily basis. The best greens are spinach, kale, arugula (rochettes), and broccoli. Good blood flow provides oxygen and nourishes all of the body's tissues.

I have also discovered the Linus Pauling Therapy/Protocol which is based on the theory that we need to build collagen to allow the body to repair itself, especially the arteries around the heart. In order to do so, most people would benefit from 2,000 mg daily of Vitamin C, and Lysine, and 500 mg of Proline. The latter two are amino acids - essential building blocks for muscle and collagen. Those who already have heart disease are advised to have at least twice that dosage of each. If you spread the dosage of these 3 throughout the day, there are no side-effects.

As Londinium noted - CoQ10 is essential not just for those on statins, but all people over age 50 as the body's own production of this begins to diminish with age. I personally take about 370 mg daily. I also take Vitamins B3 (Niacin - to reduce LDL & increase HDL cholesterol), B6, B9 (Folate or Folic Acid), Vitamin C, D, E, Turmeric, Fish Oil, Lysine and Proline,.

To ensure good health, it is essential to monitor blood work regularly. I measure my blood work every 3 months (I live in Canada) to see the impact of dietary and vitamin dosage modifications. My blood work has continued to improve each time and I feel more energetic and healthier than at any other time in my life.

I also ensure I get a copy of all blood work and medical tests for my files. Doctors do not have the time to be as diligent and thorough as you would be in looking after yourself.

I hope reading about my experience helps both you and your dad.

Good luck.

P.S. There is no medicine that can replace a healthy diet and daily exercise. Age should not be a factor in restricting exercise. If there's a will, there's a way.

Here's a link to the Pritikin Longevity Center's cookbook. This is a great book to follow for a healthy diet.

pritikin.com/pritikin-at-ho...

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pamant
pamant
in reply to sos007

Thank you so much! Wow! You are really on top of it and lucky to live in Canada where you can get good healthcare. I will check out the link. luckily, my parents are very agreeable, signing releases for the new, young dr that the just obtained. Hoping to really advocate for them. I have read much of the science already. My husband and I eat whole food, protein, organic vegetables, limit sugar. Now just needing to work with the folks. Unfortunately, terrible messages out there on what constitutes a good diet. Right now my focus is getting information on proper supplementation as well as sound research so that I am well informed when talking to the MD. My parents are more likely to comply to a plan if the MD is on the same page. Also, open to what the MD says if it is sound science. Thus far haven't seen sound science for prescribing my elderly fa a statin.

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sos007
sos007Ambassador
in reply to pamant

Our healthcare here in Canada is not any better than anywhere else. It is government-run which is to say, behind the current science, full of shortages that result in long delays for treatment, and the doctors are educated primarily by pharmaceutical companies. Doctors are stressed for time because the government can't pay them to take more time for each patient, so you are herded into clinics where you wait all day to see a specialist for 5 minutes. Or you wait months to get a specialist appointment.

In a government run system there is no accountability for poor nutritional habits, behaviour, and a lack of exercise. People eat and drink to excess, they smoke and take unnecessary risks, knowing that if they need medical treatment, the taxpayer will look after them.

-------------------------

They told me my only option was bypass surgery, but in hindsight with my new found knowledge, I would've been better off to avoid it. My surgery was a failure and I required 5 stents to open my arteries afterward.

Unlike everywhere else in the world, those willing to pay do not have a private option unless we travel to the U.S.

Medical care is based on 'treatment' not wellness or prevention.

Regardless of where you live in the world you must take personal responsibility for your own well-being.

After reading over 100 medical journals and studies on cardiovascular disease, I have concluded that the medical establishment cannot prove the cause and effect of this disease. There is speculation of cause based on correlation of symptoms - for now the emphasis on lowering LDL cholesterol which based on my research is only a part of the issue and should not be the targeted area for treatment.

It is unlikely that you will find an advocate in the established medical system. In rehabilitating myself, I went against the advice of my cardiologist in stopping the statin and other medication. I did so because I educated myself to the point that I was confident in my views.

I measure biometrics in my blood that are not part of the routine blood work done by doctors. I learned of these complimentary bio-markers from reading. All of my recent blood tests, echo-cardiogram and endothelial function tests show me to have completely recovered - and possibly reversed the heart disease, and without relying on medications.

A healthy diet and lifestyle is all that is needed.

Do yourself a favour and read this:

practicingmedicinewithoutal...

I have written many posts that include the various blood tests I take which I must pay for myself at a cost of $330 Canadian each quarter when I repeat my bloodwork.

You can read all of my posts here:

healthunlocked.com/user/sos007

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sandybrown

I am afraid we have to face reality.

In some countries the employer has to offer older people employment his is to get the older people out of the house and to get some discussion with other people about life.

As we get older some of our body function is slow or fast or react, fact of life.

People cannot gold urine for too long and have accidents!!!

The medication guide lines do vary from practice to practice.

One life we have to enjoy it.

Simple food at lunch time, good food in the evening, plenty of water to drink, gardening or walking exercise. After age of 70, blood test numbers, reference levels and many other numbers which are man made can confuse older people therefore just keep it simple and the the life day by day. I work part time jut to keep my brain active, there are many people of my age and also younger people who are starting their working life.

I received an email on GP training on food as medicine, very interesting. the question is "WHY now?"

The best thing is to eat home cooked fresh food and fresh fruits.

Where do we get fresh food? I do not have an answer for this.

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pamant
pamant
in reply to sandybrown

Yeah, there has been so much brainwashing about low fat and people eating overly processed food. I agree. Keep it simple.

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pryor147

Hi there thank you for your post, sounds very similar to how I felt on Statins, dispite informing the dr of all complications, I was told those complications wont kill you, heart attack because of high cholesterol, dispite have a very low cholesterol diet. I have stopped the statins, musule pain sore feet no energy still persist.

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pamant
pamant
in reply to pryor147

How long ago did you stop? Hope it improves for you

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pryor147

Hi, Three to four weeks ago i stopped statins totally cold turkey. No change as yet in foot pain, muscle fatigue, head aches, although migraines have subsided. Never been so tired in my life. I have a history of running marathons I know muscle fatigue after a hard race, I have run COMRADES marathon in South Africa 10 times. This muscle pain now is relentless. I have re-started all the vitamins I was taking during training, Vitamin C - B12 - 6 magnesium potassium, Garlic tablets. Just received a book recommended on this site. EAT TO LIVE, the end of diabetes JOEL FUHRMAN, I will be starting the diet contained in this book this weekend. I will follow this 100% I am so desperate to regain my energy levels is just not funny anymore. I have always eaten well lots of veg and fruit with fish red meat & chicken. I will change and follow the book guidelines. I will post results as and when as I will keep a food dairy of what is eaten when together with insulin amounts. Already spoken to dietitian that recommended no change in diet or medication. So lets see, although at the moment it seems like I am going against medical advice. I feel I have to change something its weeks now since stopping the STATINS. Look forward to the next blood works.

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