High Lipoprotein : Does anyone know if... - Cholesterol Support

Cholesterol Support
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High Lipoprotein

vanhealth
vanhealth

Does anyone know if ubiquinol works to lower cholesterol as I don't want to take a statin- any other suggestions

23 Replies
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Have you considered life style change?

Yip I have. I eat pretty healthy but need to get out and exercise more.

sos007
sos007Ambassador

I don't know that it works. However, if you don't want to take a statin, then you must permanently change your diet and lifestyle. There is no vitamin that can reduce cholesterol on its own.

I take a small dose of Niacin (600 mg per day) which helps a little.

I suggest you read all of my posts for more information, especially the 'coming off statins' posts.

healthunlocked.com/user/sos007

Diet - a focus on a plant-based diet - mostly beans, lentils and chick peas. Eliminate simple carbs and sugars; increase consumption (2-3 meals per week) of fish - ideally salmon, trout, and arctic char; reduce consumption of animal proteins (lean chicken and turkey) to every other day. Red meat once every two weeks.

Lifestyle - a minimum of a brisk 30 minute walk per day. Ideally, twice per day.

vanhealth
vanhealth
in reply to sos007

Thanks very much. I'll check out your other posts. I think I'll try a bcomplex for now which has the niacin included

vanhealth
vanhealth
in reply to sos007

Thanks that sounds like a sensible plan

Niacin (vit B3) will certainly lower your LDL and probably raise your HDL. Make sure to get the full flush variety but to be honest I would focus on better predictors of Cardio health than LDL cholesterol which is not a particularly good predictor. Yes I know doctors tell you otherwise but the research does not position LDL very high in the rankings of predictive value. I keep a blog on this stuff and the latest post actually looks at some data on this very subject. You will see that LDL is rather low in the league table

heartattackandthenhs.wordpr...

I take "Nature Made HealthSolutions CholestOff " and "Red Yeast Rice Tablets", 2 tablets of each one with my meals, 2 times a day. I buy these supplements at Costco. I asked my doctor for options because I didn't want to take Lipitor. My cholesterol is lower with the help of these 2 supplements. Also, I stay away from fried foods, cakes, cookies, anything processed. I still have a way to go, but the tests are showing lower readings than before.

Hope this helps.

vanhealth
vanhealth
in reply to diane5

Yes I will start with recommended foods and supplements and take it from there. I'm also scared to take statins as I had breast cancer 7 years ago now and the tamoxifen played havoc with my joints so I don't want to go down that road again.

DakCB-UK
DakCB-UK
in reply to diane5

The active ingredient in Red Yeast Rice is lovastatin aka Mevacor.

There are some functional foods: one-shot measured-dose plant stanol drinks (ignore the margarines and so on where it's difficult to get the dose), porridge made from 50g of oatbran for breakfast, soya instead of dairy, handfuls of nuts.

In the drugs, there's an absorption inhibitor (ezetimibe) and bile acid sequestrant (colestipol or cholestyramine), if you can tolerate them. Worst case, those seem rarely to cause statin-like problems. Or there's the stonkingly expensive new PCSK9 inhibitors (alirocumab and so on).

The first question is why do you want to lower your cholesterol, who said it was high and how do they know it is high for you? No two people are the same; perhaps there's a cause which would be better addressed as that would deal with the problem more directly.

Here follows a précis of only a small part of a chapter in a book entitled “Gut, the inside story” written by a German doctor, Giulia Enders.

Definition of cholesterol: It comes from the Greek words “chole” = bile and “stereos” = solid. It was first discovered in gallstones.

The body produces between 75% and 90% of its own cholesterol. It is needed for sex hormones, vitamin D and a plethora of unstable cells. There has been shown a connection between low cholesterol level and memory problems, depression and aggressive behaviour.

The level is ideally controlled by various bacteria in the gut, some encourage the production others suppress it.

The connection between bacteria and cholesterol was first discovered in the 1970s. Studies on Maasai warriors in Africa discovered that the cholesterol levels in their blood were low despite a diet consisting almost entirely of meat and milk. The excessive amount of animal fat in their diet did not cause high blood-lipid levels. A mysterious ingredient in the milk was suspected of controlling the cholesterol levels however experiments on milk from, cows, camels and even rats found nothing.

In another experiment the Maasai warriors were given a vegetable based milk replacement product (Coffee Mate) with high levels of cholesterol added to it. Their cholesterol levels did not change. The bacteria inhabiting their gut from previously drunk milk had accommodated the excess and dealt with it.

The results of these experiments carried out on only a small number of subjects were confirmed later when further work was done relating cholesterol levels with gut bacteria.

Lastly I recommend that you read an article written by a retired heart surgeon which you can find at: healthscams.org.uk/heart-su... I think you will find what he has to say, interesting.

sos007
sos007Ambassador
in reply to Tibblington

The link above to Dr. Lundell certainly argues against the establishment medical community on the subject of heart disease. However, you should also be aware that this doctor has a very checkered past and lost his medical license. Every story has two sides - here's what a detailed look into his past shows:

quackwatch.org/11Ind/lundel...

Tibblington
Tibblington
in reply to sos007

Hello sos007, thank you for aquainting us with that site. It is always imortant to hear the other side however it is useful to remember that although he had these misdemeanours his arguments about saturated fats have since been supported by the editorial in the BMJ and also by Dr. Salem Yusuf whose paper was recommended for reading here.

Tibblington,

Quackwatch/Stephen Barrett has a very checkered past.

You're safer doing your own research and drawing your own conclusions.

truthwiki.org/stephen-barre...

quackpotwatch.org/quackpots...

sos007
sos007Ambassador
in reply to Tibblington

I don't necessarily disagree with Dr. Lundell's assertions, only that we all have to be careful as to the sources of our information as none of us are medical professionals. Verification of information and sources is crucial to objective dissemination of information, as noted in this process in the field of journalism.

americanpressinstitute.org/...

As everyone who follows my posts knows, I implemented significant dietary and lifestyle modifications in order to get off of all medications including statins.

However the cause of cardiovascular disease as we can all see is still very controversial and as such I like to keep an open mind on the subject and be as objective as possible.

sandybrown
sandybrown
in reply to sos007

Do you know what happened in 2008?

sos007
sos007Ambassador
in reply to sandybrown

What?

Londinium
Londinium
in reply to sos007

Sos,

Quackwatch Stephen Barrett has a very checkered past. I suggest people do their own research and draw their own conclusions.

truthwiki.org/stephen-barre...

quackpotwatch.org/quackpots...

sos007
sos007Ambassador
in reply to Londinium

...very interesting...clearly the enemies of the state, have their own enemies. It would make sense for pharmaceutical firms to discredit anybody who attempts to break up their statin cash-cow. However it does underscore my initial assertion that you have be careful about drawing conclusions from just one source as there are deep biases entrenched in both the system and among practitioners.

Update re cholesterol lowering drugs -

vaccineimpact.com/2017/as-l...

don't worry about Cholesterol so much, worrying will give you strokes that will rob you of your life.

Hi Vanhealth,

Why didn't you tried some simple home remedies, like Coriander or cinnamon tea. There is a very simple method to prepare tea (fabhow.com/reduce-bad-chole...). These herbs have the proven capability to control the cholesterol.

Mine was reached 208, after a consultation, my doc gave me the advice to try this and it really helped. Don't worry, it can be easily cured.

Could you please let me know in which country you received this advice from your doctor. In Sri Lanka when I was growing up we used coriander tea for many health problems. Cinnamon (Sri Lankan) is the best for health.

Thank you for the link.

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