Kyphosis : Received a copy of hospital letter... - Bone Health

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Kyphosis

Jennymary
Jennymary

Received a copy of hospital letter today following my appt 3 weeks ago, nothing much in there that I didn't already know except that the xray of my back has shown I've got Kyphosis but no underlying vertebral fractures, anyone know what this means, he also hasn't put in the letter the results of the 2 blood tests that were done, vitamin d and thyroid, might GP have been sent these and not me

15 Replies
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Kyphosis, as far as I know, refers to an outward curve in your back. It is noticeable in people with severe osteoporosis but many of us develop a bit of a stoop as we age anyway. One way to counteract this is walking poles as they automatically make us stand straighter. My physiotherapist has me lying with a large foam roller across my shoulder blades, she says the longer the better but I confess I only do it for a couple of minutes, to help the spine be somewhat less rounded than it wants to be! You perhaps could consider a visit to an experienced physiotherapist to get a set of exercises especially targeted for any back issues you have which will help you to maintain and improve muscle strength, which in turn helps to support the spine.

Jennymary
Jennymary
in reply to HeronNS

Thank you, I'm in the middle of purchasing a new fridge/freezer, but I'll look into that in the next few weeks

Easiest perhaps to think of it as postural imbalance [your spine's not posed in its natural curve [with the vertebrae and pads between vertebrae evenly lined up], which means that you're needlessly stressing it when exerting yourself, which could put weakened vertebrae at needless risk of fracturing, a serious concern for those with osteoporosis]. It's worth an effort imo, to figure out how to correct this (as mentioned just earlier here, a physiotherapist sounds a useful source of advice).

I suspect any stretches needing to be done would work best if done: conservatively/gently, and, for prolonged periods of time (>10 minutes, I've seen mention of >20 minutes) to end up having a beneficial impact. But I think just being actively conscious of the problem may help you manually align yourself better which could become an ingrained reflex, especially if you already have good body awareness. I read somewhere that wearing a modest (5 lb?) 'front' pack, helps remind patients about straightening up [I've also seen mention of 'taping' the shoulders to provide a physical cue, you feel the tape pull more when you lapse back into the habit of allowing the imbalanced kyphosis pose].

HeronNS
HeronNS
in reply to wbiC

My physiotherapist told me to settle down with a good book, but it isn't really feasible when you're lying on the roller on the floor! I suppose I could arrange things so I can watch tv for 20 minutes or so! But I have found Nordic walking very helpful, actually.

Hello

Would the roller be on your back or front. Sorry if I appear dim, but I suppose it could work both ways?

Place the roller on the floor, crossways on your exercise mat. Lie down with the roller at your shoulder blades, not lower. Support your head and tip it backwards and hold . What you are attempting to do is diminish the rounding of the spine which gives older people a hunched back. My roller is rigid foam, 6" (15 cm) diameter.

Thank you for info.

wbiC
wbiC
in reply to HeronNS

If you've an mp3 player (or for the rich, an iPod), or a CD player, your local library may offer audiobooks that you'd enjoy borrowing or downloading. There may be radio and talk shows on TV available. Myself, I'm content to just meditate for that short bit of time if I needed such a stretching routine (I find meditating very relaxing, and it helps 'cushion' me from the rest of the days 'bumps').

HeronNS
HeronNS
in reply to wbiC

Thanks for suggestion. In my old home I could be positioned so I could watch tv. It's not comfortable enough for meditation purposes. But where I live now the furniture is configured differently. I suppose I could time it for when there's an interesting radio program on.

Hi, I have kyphosis it means your starting to bend at the top of the spine. Hope this helps.

Jennymary
Jennymary
in reply to ROSmember

Thank you, have you tried to reverse it, if so how, any advice will be gratefully received, I'm waiting to hear back from my local Macmillan centre as the website they do Nordic Walking as an activity

ROSmember
ROSmember
in reply to Jennymary

Hi, not really I do try to stand up straight.. I’ve never tried Nordic walking I have seen people doing it near where I live. I feel my age is against me 71 as there’s not a lot I can do and not for very long!! I go for walks weather permitting only short ones. I feel I’ve not been much help sorry 😐

Jennymary
Jennymary
in reply to ROSmember

Don't worry, I'm 57 and finding all this a bit difficult as the hospital don't know how to deal with me!!! So I'm just getting advice from people on this forum and Dr Google

ROSmember
ROSmember
in reply to Jennymary

I have become a member of Royal Osteoporosis society that’s where I find loads of my answers as well as on here. 😊

HeronNS
HeronNS
in reply to ROSmember

Nordic walking has been taken up by seniors everywhere! A friend of mine was in her 80s, nearly doubled over with OP. With walking poles she can stand upright. At the reception for her husband's funeral she was there with her poles so she could be upright. She isn't able to use the poles quite correctly, but with instruction she learned a way for her to use them and the instructor considered her a star pupil! I was 68 when I got my poles, pushing 73 now. I didn't use them much this winter as there seemed to be a lot of salt on the sidewalks from our various weather events, usually I could use them more often, but I intend to get back into the habit come the spring. The instructor told us to start off with no more than 15 minutes three times a week, and gradually add more time and/or frequency at our own pace.

I thought I'd look a fool and planned to go out only after dark, but I found I really enjoyed using them so right away I was out there doing my three times a week walk. Nearly everyone who comments is interested and wants to know more - fewer people ask now as they see more and more people out using them so it's commonplace now. I just ignore the smart alecks (in all these years only one or two) who tell me I've forgotten my skis!

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