What exercise is good?

I broke my wrist in November and had a bone scan which has resulted in a diagnosis of osteoporosis. I have read that exercise where you bend forward is not good, but I am really keen on bowls and curling which both involve bending down. In the case of curling you are bending to deliver the stone, then bending to sweep the stone down the ice. Does anyone know if it is safe to continue with these sports? I would really like to keep competing.

6 Replies

  • According to Dr Google, there are mixed messages. It looks as though exercises that require bending and twisting should in general be avoided. But elsewhere bowling, for example, is encouraged. You should check with your doctor, but common sense would lead me to believe that if you have been playing these sports consistently, and therefore have strong muscles in your back why wouldn't you carry on? One of the websites I read actually lists both bowling and curling as ways to keep joints healthy and mobile.


  • Thanks! I will carry on until someone tells me otherwise. I find them both great exercise!

  • There's an article in the latest NOS magazine all about exercise. I think you have to be more careful about bending forward if you have compression fractures, but those bowls can be rather heavy so that is where the danger may lie. I'm sure if you are careful, you should be OK. Enjoy, they both look like great sports. I love watching. :-)

  • Thanks for replying :-) What is the NOS magazine and where do you get it? Thanks!

  • If you become a member of NOS, National Osteoporosis Society, nos.org.uk/get-involved/bec... you are sent a copy four times a year. It costs £18 a year.

  • Just had a thought, as there are different kinds of bowling in different countries. Poemsgalore mentioned the fact that the balls are very heavy. The website I sent is Canadian. Don't know where you live, but that might be something to consider. So, use your judgement, you know what you can handle. The thing is, weight-bearing is supposed to be good for our bones. It's guarding how the back is moving that is the key, I guess.

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