Fatigue after stent surgery - British Heart Fou...

British Heart Foundation
12,176 members7,563 posts

Fatigue after stent surgery

My partner of 54 is 2mths post stent surgery. He is experiencing extreme fatigue which is so unlike him and it's really starting to affect his mental health. He's Diabetic T2, on Statins, blood pressure pills, antidepressants. We're thinking the statins could be causing the fatigue? Any advice would be great. GP was generally unsympathetic. Thanks in advance

40 Replies
oldestnewest

I'm nearly 3 months post stent am just beginning to feel alive again , anxious and still tearful , but able to do more than I did previously , but still have to listen to the little signs your body tells you when it's maybe too much Its a slow process ,

2 likes
Reply

Thankyou Daffodills. Can I ask - did you have any problems with your medication?

Reply

Well I am loathe to change mine as apparently I am on very good drugs , however I ache from the inside it's like I am raw,so I combat that with paracetamol, and rub plenty of deep heat on my chest and back , and cuddle a water bottle at night !, the statin gave me reflux , and I was given Lansoprazole

Reply

Are you on soluble asprin?If so that could be the culprit. You need coated asprin to avoid reflux. Mine was crippling until I changed. 1 in 1000 suffer with soluble but it is a lot cheaper for 6th NH'S.

Reply

Interesting regards aspirin. Rehab inform me the coated were a waste of time as research has shown they still cause upset in those sensitive to them

Reply

I have had nightmares with my meds. Seem to be allergic to them all but the most chronic symptom was Indegestood every night. No sleep the pain in my chest horrendous.

Found out it was soluble aspirin. Now gone on coated Asprin. Just hope it works.

Reply

I was very tired for months following my angioplasty and stents. Give it a bit of time. Is there a nurse practitioner at your GP. They might need to tweak his medication slightly.

Reply

Hi there, most likely the blood pressure pills are the cause here. He should go back to his GP and see if the meds can be adjusted

Reply

Thankyou. We will contact GP again

Reply

I had fatigue for a couple of weeks, the Cardiac nurse said the heart is sensitive and doesn’t like ‘being messed about with’ , also discomfort for a few weeks especially when lying on my left, in bed. But this sounds quite a long time, if your husband is a bit worse, rather than a bit better! Try GP again?

Reply

Hi it’s taken me three years to feel better after quadruple bypass and now 15 stents the last stent in Dec 17, and had two stent s expanded, had heart attack following day, hang on in I’m now feeling brilliant!!! In my experience GP’s do not understand, nor do some cardiologist, you have to in my opinion had to experience these procedures to relate to the pain, I’ve been very unlucky I know with so many complications and found it extremely frustrating that doctors do not understand, however I’ve been fortunate enough to have a cardiologist who listened to me and not his colleagues and performed my last procedures which have finally fingers crossed done the trick, I would advise contacting your cardiologist by his secretary GP waist of time. Also A private consultant is a good idea as you have time to talk, the nhs appointment is only ten minutes!!

Well worth a couple of hundred to speak will them x good luck x

3 likes
Reply

What antidepressants is he on and how long has he been on them? I was on citalopram for some time and I was constantly fatigued. I had to come off them.

Reply

Hi, he is on Citalopram - interesting? Will speak to Gp. Thankyou

1 like
Reply

Hi I am 2 years of a CA and 6 stents, fatigue is still a problem for me and being thankful for coming of Ticgrelor and Bisoprolol in Sept last year, I am worse for it !, it would seem that the Bisoprolol was helping my body with energy, very confusing as I thought once clear of drugs that were being taken as a precaution, that would be me back to norm, however I find it very frustrating to be looking like going back on the Bisoprolol, and also no one can explain why some come out good and some need med help !. as people are saying you are in very early stages and need to adjust how your body feels but dont give up and keep trying to do as you used to without over straining, build it up slowly with plenty of rest as I found out in my early time. wish you well.

Reply

Thankyou

Reply

I'm 4 months post stent treatment and it is only in the last 2 weeks that I have sped up a little! I'm sure that it is the cocktail of medication and the huge shock mentally and physically. The best advice that I keep getting is "it takes time, it's still very early days" . With that and my GP tweaking the medication I am beginning to feel like me again. I had been so low I was considering taking up the counselling service on offer but once I accepted being slow for a while was normal I started to feel better. It sounds like you need a more sympathetic GP , but I found the cardiac nurses to be really helpful too. The cardiac rehab also helped me realise that I could push myself a little harder without harming myself. So, give it time, it's early days.

Reply

Hi Adispartner

I had heart attack and stents last June. I still get fatigued and tearful! However the good days now outweigh the bad ones. I have learned to listen to my body and when I am tired I have a nap so if I come in late I have 30 minutes on the sofa so I feel refreshed for the evening and at weekends I sometimes have afternoon naps. Having said that he may need his medication adjusting. Has he been to cardiac rehab yet? The process of exercise and building confidence helped enormously. Also the cardiac nurses in my area run a medication review clinic so they were able to review my medication as well. So if he hasn’t had his rehab yet it maybe worth pursuing. Also does he have a specific diabetes nurse/consultant that he could also contact? Stay strong both of you. And keep retrying with GP/ consultant for rehab and review. Take care of yourself as well. Best wishes Zena

1 like
Reply

Thankyou Zena - will will contact Diabetes and Cardiac teams

Reply

Thankyou

Reply

Hi I experience the fatigue and know it is due to Beta Blocker Bisoprolol. This is common knowledge.

Reply

Thanks for that. Several people have suggested meds could be the problem so I think we need to speak with GP or cardiac team

Reply

I had heart attack 4 mnths ago, Fatigue is still one of the hardest things to deal with, I too am on Bisoprolol, Heart Foundation nurse advised me this week that it is very important that I continue with all of my current medication, I am just having to learn to pace myself and I AM STILL ALIVE.

2 likes
Reply

Yes you have summed it up about pacing oneself and adapting to new meds. A small price to pay . Wishing you good luck with your recovery

1 like
Reply

Absolutely agree. No two people are the same and will each have different experiences after heart trouble. I suppose the secret to getting through it, is to find your balance of input/output. My partner always comments upon waking "well I made it through another night!". I wish everbody well who's going through these tough times

3 likes
Reply

Thank you for good wishes, Living alone it is good to find others who understand x

Reply

My Cardiac team have took me off Bisoprolol.

Said my pulse was fine and didn't undrstand why I was put on them in the first place.

Reply

I had a stent fitted nearly four weeks ago, I’m a 37 year old female with kids so I’ve tried to get back into a normal routine for my kids and partner. But I’m not rushing back to work, and worry how I’ll manage my tiredness when I have to. I really recommend listening to your body and napping- I always wake up more able to face the day. I’m on a lot of medication but feel the tiredness is more my body responding to the stent and what’s happened.

2 likes
Reply

Thankyou. I think we expected him to feel tired, but not to this extent. He's more tired now than before his heart attack. As a partner, it's painful to watch. He IS a tryer but he struggles to do the simplest tasks. Exertion seems to make him even worse.

Reply

Is he part of the cardio program? My cardio nurse was amazing, she gave me more info than any of the cardiologists (as they see you at a critical time). One of my friends who had heart issues warned me of the tiredness. But it’s so hard as now is the time I need energy to lose weight!!

I’d recommend trying to see another GP as he isn’t been listened to. Having heart disease is scary, the least needed is a sympathetic GP (mine is great, so definitely try others till you find the right one). Good luck x

Reply

I couldnt agree more re Cardio nurse, mine have been amazing and nothing is too much trouble for mine at Omagh Hospital, plus she is always at the end of the phone too, means a lot when you are 77 and live alone. Although I do my best not to trouble her, I did find the rehab course invaluable, although I am not fit enough for the exercises.

1 like
Reply

Hi I had a stent on 21-8-18 I’m still getting really tired and I’m not sleeping that well.

I get what your saying.

1 like
Reply

Hi I am 53 and had a heart attack and 2 stents fitted in December 2017. I agree with the others, in recovery terms it is still early days but also yes medication seems to wreak havoc with my energy levels. My GP is tinkering with my blood pressure meds as I seem to have very high BP now that hasn't responded to life style changes I have made. I still nap when I have to and again agree with the others that cardiac rehab has helped enormously. I wish your husband a full recovery and best wishes to you too.

1 like
Reply

I'm a similar age and had an emergency stent, I was previously active and asymptomatic.

I was amazed how much my stamina was adversely affected. 12 months later, still taking the full meds bundle, I'm around the fitness levels I was at before the heart attack. I found the set back very frustrating but I set myself a gradually increasing exercise plan. if I overdid it I certainly knew about it, so slow and steady increments in activity is the way to go.

Reply

Thanks Ian, that's reassuring to know

Reply

Perfect reply😊 and I couldn’t agree more. 46, no heart attack, stents 3 days ago, so maybe I am not really in a position to give advice. But, add good diet to this and it sounds perfect. I know I shouldn’t have..... but I wanted something to do yesterday😳, so I pulled all the weeds down one side of the garden! Oh my god!! I didn’t feel so good after 😂. Wasn’t sure what to do or what was happening. No chest pain, just feel really queer, stomach felt funny, couldn’t concentrate, couldn’t focus to long on anything. Nearly called for advice, but laid down, which also felt weird. An hour of sleep later and felt like nothing had happened. And that’s when I met my new partner, fatigue!!

I didn’t feel any pain, but with this kind of feeling and the knowledge that someone has been tinkering with bits you can’t see and you know it is your absolute life giver, it scared the shit out of me. So, as Ian has so rightly said, ease back in, drink plenty of water (not too much, just keep the wee clear 😳), go with the best diet you can manage, be positive and progress your activities in very small increments daily, even to the point of just a few extra steps each day.

I don’t know if doing this will also work through the drugs side effects, but I can’t see why it wouldn’t, if done gradually.

Be positive everyone, good to know you are all here 😉.

3 likes
Reply

I am nearly 65 and had a stent a year ago, got back to swimming a mile after 3months ,accepted that i doze off in the comfy chair more often but dont get the tight chest anymore on cold days out walking in the woods. Had to add another blood thinner when AF was detected 4 months ago . Oh and after my angina was found and treated my younger brother realised what might be happening to him and had 2 stents fitted a few months ago. So do keep your siblings informed. best wishes for a recovery.

Reply

My grandad had heart attacks before my age, my dad had a triple bypass at 55, stroke at 70, my mum died from a heart attack at 65 and I am now stented at 46.

My dad told me 3-4 years ago to go to A&E faking chest pain to get fully checked out. They gave me an ECG and discharged me! A few years later I was walking on a beautiful cold sunny morning and it just felt a little uncomfortable breathing, not really tight just uncomfortable. I likened it to drinking cold water with a pack of mints in your mouth. It really wasn’t major, but as I was on my own I googled it! Girlfriend scoffed when I told her the first result was Angina, people do hate self diagnosis! But I am confident it saved my life! After being sent to rapid access heart clinic I found another, almost disbelieving nurse asking why I thought I had angina! That’s when I kind of pieced together 3 years and 3 angina related incidents! Just 3 over 3 years!

After angiogram I was told I was lucky to be there and needed either bypass(strongly recommended) or complex PCIs, preferred due to my age. They managed 2 stents in first surgery but due to volume of dye, I am returning for the other side to be done, which is less life threatening.

The moral is to understand and listen to your body and also factor in family history. If my dad had told me about the feeling of discomfort when breathing in cold air, I would have done this years ago!!! I’m feeling very positive now and can’t wait to get back to full health. My kids have also been checked now, but it seems it stopped with me, thank god. I will remind them in years to come.

Good luck everyone xx

Reply

I went to the er fearing i was having a heart attack. The hospital did all the normal testing and everything came back negative. Lucky for me they assigned a cardiologist to my case that knew his stuff. He refused to believe the tests and advised me to have a cardiac catherization done. They found an artery to be 95% blocked and placed a stent. Feeling pretty lucky I was assigned to this doctor!!!

Reply

Hi,

I have to agree with everyone regarding meds. I now take my bisoprolol at night and my Ramipril in the morning and that helped. However, a word of warning, a few people's body's reject the stents and squash them. Mine did. The result was a bypass operation, which I dreaded, but since that I've been able to return to work and feel generally good. My heart attack was 1 year ago now and the bypass 6 months ago. Exercise helps a lot to get your body and heart fitter which helps with everything else. I also discovered that I'm diabetic, probably the cause of the heart attack, so changing foods was also required.

The moral of the story is that if things are not right, talk to the cardiologists and get them to check things out. Then, change the meds as needed working with your GP / hospital. If one has done permanent damage to your heart, as I did, it will take time to recover and moderate exercise, managed via the cardiac rehab team is the best way to go before going to the gym etc.

2 likes
Reply

J

Reply

You may also like...