Back in/out AFib 5 months post ablation - AF Association

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Back in/out AFib 5 months post ablation

kitenski
kitenski

I had an ablation 2nd Feb, for May and June I was off all medication and in NSR.

Suddenly I had some episodes of A Fib early July so am back on the meds and it has settled but still getting the odd episodes of A Fib inter dispersed with NSR.

Just wondering if anyone else had similar and did it settle down or did you need a second ablation?

I realise everyone is different but just trying to gather other experiences.

15 Replies
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BobD
BobDVolunteer

Five months is getting there but maybe things will still improve a little. Ablation is never a cure for AF as nothing is but should help with symptoms. I needed three before mine finally gave in in 2008. When is your next EP appointment where you can discuss the future.? I do hope you are still on anticoagulants.

Have you done all the life style changes needed?

IGREENAWAY
IGREENAWAY
in reply to BobD

Hi Bob

I’ve often read from you and others that Ablation is not a cure for AF but it just helps with the symptoms, but you have said that yours “gave in 11 years ago”. Does that mean in your case the Ablation (s) did, in fact, lead to a permanent cure? The reason I ask is that I am on a waiting list for an Ablation in Exeter but I have had long standing persistent AF now for at least 2 years (only in NSR for 4 days and then 5 days after 2 cardioversions), but I am very much asymptotic so I am exploring the pros and cons of actually having an Ablation or not when the time comes. I don’t want to have one only to then become aware that I have AF and experience scary symptoms as a result of an Ablation because at the moment it’s only when I take my meds that I’m reminded that I have AF! My EP has recommended an Ablation I think due to my age (58) and the fact that whilst I remain very active in terms of exercise (cycling), I am not as active in this respect as I used to be so he feels that is a quality of life issue.

I look forward to reading your views on this

Thanks

RoyM
RoyM
in reply to IGREENAWAY

Hi like you I am in perm AF and have been for 3 years. I had a cardiversion that reverted me to NSR for 11 hrs. I am lucky not to have any symptoms apart from perhaps losing the top 10% of my ability to exercise. I am 72 still cycle, swim, walk about 5 miles each day and most importantly still able to chase my very active 6 year old grandaughter around. I was offered an Ablation and considered it very seriously. I worried the Ablation would in my case actually make things worse. My EP agreed with my rationale and apart from taking Apixiban and 1.25mg of Bisoporol daily I live a very normal and active life. I have stopped chasing the holy grail of NSR. Good luck with your decision. Roy

IGREENAWAY
IGREENAWAY
in reply to RoyM

Thanks Roy. Yes your situation is very similar to mine and the EP said essentially it’s up to me.

F-M-C-MM
F-M-C-MM
in reply to RoyM

I read a couple of years ago that a new type of ablation is available in Bordeaux, France for those who have persistant and permanent A Fib. I refer to Dr. Haïssaguerre's team who have invented a new type of vest which maps the troublesome areas of the heart prior to ablation. Is this method now being used in the UK for more complex Ablations?

RoyM
RoyM
in reply to F-M-C-MM

Thanks for your interest and reply...but it is not a procedure I have heard of. Roy

F-M-C-MM
F-M-C-MM
in reply to RoyM

I will try to locate article and post it when I have time. The waistcoat is metallic and maps out the troublesome rotors in the atria. You could meanwhile Google it to see what you find. I haven't heard any further publicity about it which surprises me, but I read about a doctor who went to France to have it done , because as you know this is where the ablation technique was first used.

F-M-C-MM
F-M-C-MM
in reply to F-M-C-MM

I found a description on AFib.com.

It's called a Cardioinsight ECGI vest like device with 256 electrodes for 3D non invasive mapping. It is used the day before ablation to map and identify sites producing AFib signals, rotors and focal sources etc. You should be able to get some further info on Google. I gather it's being used in the US already.

BobD
BobDVolunteer
in reply to IGREENAWAY

I can only quote the mantra from top EPs. Any and All treatment for AF is only about quality of life (QOL) . If your QOL is good then fine. When the pupil is ready the teacher will come.

So back on topic nobody else has experienced anything similar? Interesting question BobD , my consultant has said nothing about lifestyle changes. Said coffee, alcohol all ok in moderation. I can see him when I want, as work health insurance, but running very low on my outpatient allowance.

BobD
BobDVolunteer
in reply to kitenski

Plenty of data on life style especially weight loss. BMI of less than 25. no alcohol, reduce stress, reduce reliance on meat and processed foods, more plant based diet etc etc. Its all there if you look for it.

kitenski
kitenski
in reply to BobD

Bmi is 23, hardly eat any processed foods and exercise regularly.

Jjda
Jjda
in reply to kitenski

Are you in the US? I found that the US doctors are "all over the map" regarding post ablation treatment. And they really don't talk about lifestyle changes being important in relation to Afib. Mine never said anything unless I asked a direct question, and then just said that it is always a good idea, Afib or not, to maintain a healthy weight, limit alcohol, exercise regularly and eat less saturated fat. I got much more info on this forum than I did from my EP.

That said, I had some extra beats and increased heart rate for the first 6-9 months after my ablation. None of them got recorded as Afib, and I wore a heart monitor for 30 days, plus I have a KardiaMobile device which has not caught any episodes as Afib. It is not unusual to have some issues in the first year after an ablation, so stay on the anti-coagulant, and keep monitoring your episodes. It may take another ablation to get it all worked out.

Samazeuilh
Samazeuilh
in reply to Jjda

I have been told by an EP as well as various GP’s that lifestyle changes can reduce the burden of AF for *some* people but if you make these changes there is abdolutely no guarantee that they will benefit you. They said, however, that one should adhere to a healthy diet, take exercise etc. for general health.

kitenski
kitenski
in reply to Jjda

Nope I’m in the UK. Does seem strange that the consultants don’t have a lifestyle plan going forward.

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